Monthly Archives: October 2011

Scream 4

Summary: Sidney Prescott, now the author of a self-help book, returns home to Woodsboro on the last stop of her book tour. There she reconnects with Sheriff Dewey and Gale, who are now married, as well as her cousin Jill and her Aunt Kate. Unfortunately Sidney’s appearance also brings about the return of Ghostface, putting Sidney, Gale, and Dewey, along with Jill, her friends, and the whole town of Woodsboro in danger.

Year: 2011

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th April, 2011

Australian DVD Release Date: 13th October, 2011

Country: USA

Director: Wes Craven

Screenwriter: Kevin Williamson

Cast: Anthony Anderson (Deputy Perkins), David Arquette (Dewey Riley), Kristen Bell (Chloe), Alison Brie (Rebecca Walters), Adam Brody (Deputy Hoss), Mark Aaron Buerkle (Dr. Orth), Neve Campbell (Sidney Prescott), Courteney Cox (Gale Weathers-Riley), Rory Culkin (Charlie Walker), Dane Farwell (Ghostface), Shenae Grimes (Trudie), Lucy Hale (Sherrie), Roger Jackson (The Voice (voice)), Marielle Jaffe (Olivia Morris), Eric Knudsen (Robbie Mercer), John Lepard (Mr. Baker), Mary McDonnell (Kate Roberts), Gordon Michaels (Deputy Jenkins), Hayden Panettiere (Kirby Reed), Anna Paquin (Rachel), Emma Roberts (Jill Roberts), Britt Robertson (Marnie Cooper), Marley Shelton (Deputy Judy Hicks), Aimee Teegarden (Jenny Randall), Nico Tortorella (Trevor Sheldon)

Runtime: 111 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘SCREAM 4’:

David Griffiths: Stars(3)

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Scream 4’ Review: If you ever needed further proof that screenwriter, Kevin Williamson and legendary director, Wes Craven know horror fans better than anyone else than Scream 4 is all the proof that you will ever need. These two know that fans have been disappointed with how the recent Saw films forget about storylines and simply become “torture porn” and they know how fans feel about series re-boots. So what do they do? They reboot their own famous Scream series of films and then make fun of themselves for doing so because as Sidney Prescott so elegantly puts it in Scream 4, you ‘don’t f**k with originals’.

Scream 4 sees Sidney Prescott (Neve Campbell) return to Woodsboro ten years after the last spate of killings. Here Sidney finds that Dewey Riley (David Arquette) is now Sheriff and still married to Gale Weathers-Riley (Courtney Cox). In fact the only concern seems to be that Deputy Judy Hicks (Marley Shelton) has her eyes on Dewey. However, with Sidney back in town to promote her book, we soon see the re-emergence of Ghostface as he begins a new killing spree this time centered around Sidney’s family, her cousin Jill (Emma Roberts) and Jill’s friends.

The great thing is that while Williamson and Craven do use Scream 4 as a vehicle to air their concerns about modern horror films they certainly don’t forget that they are actually making a film. While they poke fun at all the modern horror ‘rules’, they have developed a storyline that means that Ghostface is back slicing and dicing, and as usual the audience sits there, occasionally jumping, while desperately trying to work out who the killer his. And now because the audience has come to love Sidney, Dewey and Gale, the killings seem more personal… you certainly don’t want something to happen to any of them.

And while Neve Campbell, David Arquette and Courtney Cox don’t really do anything to show that their acting has got better over the years, some of the younger cast members do use Scream 4 to show Hollywood that they are ready to take some big steps in their careers. Hayden Panettiere has chopped off her hair and shows she is ready to shake off her Heroes-actress tag while Jericho fans will be pleased to see Eric Knudsen up on the big screen. His portrayal of the geeky, Robbie Mercer proves that he is the next Jesse Eisenberg in the making.

Scream 4 certainly does a give a voice to the disgruntled horror fans that have been disenchanted with what Hollywood has been serving up recently, now we just have to hope that they listen. And yes as you would expect from a Kevin Williamson script you are kept guessing who is behind the Ghostface mask until the very end.

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:Scream 4 (2011) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Scream 4′: This review was first published in Buzz Magazine.

We should have known that when screenwriter, Kevin Williamson (TV’S Hidden Palms & The Vampire Diaries) and Wes Craven (My Soul To Take, Paris, Je T’Aime) teamed up once again to bring us Scream 4 that it was never going to be a simple re-boot of the series. While telling a story of its own Williamson and Craven use Scream 4 to take a swipe at the current Horror Kings (those behind the Saw franchise) while pushing across the point ‘don’t f**k with originals’ (which is how Sidney Prescott so elegantly puts it), and considering that audience members have been clapping the line you can only be left thinking that it’s a popular belief amongst serious horror fans.

Scream 4 sees Sidney Prescott (Neve Campbell – TV’S The Simpsons & Sea Wolf) return to Woodsboro ten years after the last spate of killings. Here Sidney finds that Dewey Riley (David Arquette – TV’S Jake And The Neverland Pirates & Medium) is now Sheriff and still married to Gale Weathers-Riley (Courtney Cox – TV’S Cougar Town & Web Therapy). In fact the only concern seems to be that Deputy Judy Hicks (Marley Shelton – Elektra Luxx, The Mighty Macs) has her eyes on Dewey. However, with Sidney back in town to promote her book we soon see the reemergence of Ghostface as he begins a new killing spree this time centered around Sidney’s family, her cousin Jill (Emma Roberts – Homework, It’s Kind Of A Funny Story) and Jill’s friends.

Like the previous movies in the series Scream 4 certainly doesn’t itself too seriously. While Craven and Williamson do make sure that it contains a story of its own they do actually poke fun at the horror genre, this time highlighting some of the “rules” in a series re-boot. You can see what you are going to get from the opening of the film when they openly make fun of the genre and then continue with outrageous scenes including one with a main character yelling “you can’t kill me I’m gay.” While they haven’t gone for a whole Scary Movie spoof they do show that the aim of Scream 4 is to give the audience a few frights while highlighting the plight of the modern horror film.

Acting-wise it is good to see Neve Campbell back in the big-screen and while David Arquette and Courtney Cox don’t offer up anything spectacular some of the younger cast certainly do step-up., the highlights being Eric Knudsen (Beastly, Scott Pilgrim vs. The World0 continues to show why he is the new Jesse Eisenberg (although anyone that watched Jericho knew he had a big future ahead of him), while Hayden Panettiere (Alpha & Omega, TV’S Heroes) sports a new look and certainly shows the film world that her career is on the rise.

Scream 4 certainly does a give a voice to the disgruntled horror fans that have been disgruntled with what Hollywood has been serving up recently, now we just have to hope that they listen. And yes you will be kept guessing who the killer is until the very end.

Trailer:

Meek's Cutoff

Summary: The year is 1845 and a wagon team of three families is setting off across the sparse terrain of the Oregon desert, in northwest USA. They are guided by mountain man Stephen Meek, who claims to know a short cut, but when they become lost in the dry rock and sage, their faith in their guide, and in each other, weakens. After days of wandering, suffering the hardships of the inhospitable landscape and unable to find water, a Native American wanderer crosses their path. The pioneers are torn between trusting their guide or a man who has always been seen as the enemy.

Year: 2010

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th June, 2011

Australian DVD Release Date: 5th October, 2011

Country: USA

Director: Kelly Reichardt

Screenwriter: Jonathan Raymond

Cast: Paul Dano (Thomas Gately), Bruce Greenwood (Stephen Meek), Shirley Henderson (Glory White), Neal Huff (William White), Zoe Kazan (Millie Gately), Tommy Nelson (Jimmy White), Will Patton (Soloman Tetherow), Rod Rondeaux (The Indian), Michelle Williams (Emily Tetherow)

Runtime: 104 mins

Classification:PG

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘MEEK’S CUTOFF’:

David Griffiths: Stars(4)

Kelly Reichardt seems to have done something over the years that has upset those responsible for making sure she wins an Oscar because while it was disappointing that Wendy & Lucy didn’t get nominated it is an absolute crime that Meek’s Cutoff wasn’t. While this isn’t a film for the popcorn set it is a film that will be lapped up by real film lovers. It is a film that will actually make you think… now you can’t say that about much modern cinema, can you?

Meek’s Cutoff follows a group of settlers as they make their way across the harsh Oregon landscape in 1845. The group which is made up of Soloman Tetherow (Will Patton), his wife, Emily (Michelle Williams) as well as the Gately Family and the White Family is being led by Stephen Meek (Bruce Greenwood) who is supposed to be a great tracker, but seems to have got the group lost. As the continue to wander aimlessly through the un-inhabitated land the realisation that they could die of starvation or thirst becomes reality, while Meek continues to warn them that the only thing they have to fear is the savage Indian tribes that are ‘watching them’. The racist Meek then takes an Indian (Rod Rondeaux) captive which divides the group.

Those familiar with Reichardt’s style will know that she likes to use minimal dialogue in her films. She once again uses this in Meek’s Cutoff and it enhances the film a million times over. It truly gives the audience a real feel of the loneliness that the characters are going through, and while some audience members will be annoyed by her ‘slow-moving’ style scenes such as the opening scene can really only be described as pieces of cinematic brilliance that true film lovers will fall in love with instantly. It is work like this that show just how good of a director Kelly Reichardt really is.

Meek’s Cutoff is penned by Jonathan Raymond (the same screenwriter who wrote Reichardt’s brilliant Wendy And Lucy) and this is one combination that seems to be a marriage in heaven. Raymond’s fine script only enhances Reichardt’s film-making style even more and if it is true that Raymond used the politics of George Bush vs. Barack Obama as a basis for the storyline of this script then he really is a screenwriting genius… and if he didn’t well he should just shut-up and let people think that he did.

This film also once again reminds the world just good Michelle Williams is as an actress. Once again she puts in a faultless performance and it seems that since her Dawson’s Creek days she has continued to grow as an actress and never once put in a bad performance. Those critical of her acting should see her ‘stand-offs’ with Bruce Greenwood in Meek’s Cutoff because they are truly sensational.

Meek’s Cutoff shows that are still some creative films that can surface from the U.S. and only proves the fact that Kelly Reichardt is one of the most important filmmakers of our generation.

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Meek’s Cutoff’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Meek’s Cutoff′: This review of ‘Meek’s Cutoff’ by David Griffiths originally appeared in Buzz Magazine.

If you’re a fan of director, Kelly Reichardt (Wendy & Lucy, Old Joy) then you are sure to love her new offering Meek’s Cutoff. But like her past work it is hard to see Meek’s Cutoff being lapped up by the popcorn set, instead this is a movie for the film-connoisseur, and one that will be well-loved by those who consider themselves at Reichardt fan.

Meek’s Cutoff is set in Oregon in 1845 as a group of settlers make their away across the country in order to stake a ‘claim’. The group which is made up of Soloman Tetherow (Will Patton – Knucklehead, Waking Madison), his wife, Emily (Michelle Williams – Shutter Island, Blue Valentine) as well as the Gately Family and the White Family is being led by Stephen Meek (Bruce Greenwood – Super 8, TV’S Young Justice) who is supposed to be a great tracker, but seems to have got the group lost. The racist Meek then takes an Indian (Rod Rondeaux – TV’S Comanche Moon & Into The West) captive which divides the group.

Reichardt once again uses her familiar style of ‘very little dialogue but brilliant cinematography’ to get the very important message held in Meek’s Cutoff across to her audience, and this is one film that is really enhanced by her ‘slow-moving’ style. The opening scenes of a wagon crossing a river a brilliant, and only goes to show just how good Reichardt is as a director.

Reichardt’s skills are only enhanced by a terrific script by Jonathan Raymond (Wendy & Lucy, TV’S Mildred Pierce). If the rumours that Raymond uses a metaphor of George Bush vs. Barack Obama are true then he is a screenwriting genius… if they aren’t true then he can simply rest on the laurels of the fact that he has created an amazing film that once again gives actress, Michelle Williams a chance to show off her brilliant skills. Any of the scenes that she does here with Bruce Greenwood are truly sensational.

Meek’s Cutoff shows that are still some creative films that can surface from the U.S. and only proves the fact that Kelly Reichardt is one of the most important filmmakers of our generation.

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating: Meek's Cutoff (2010) on IMDb

Trailer:

Skylab

Summary: It’s summer 1979 in Brittany, and a family gathers to celebrate the grandmother’s 80th birthday. The extended family are a garrulous collection and there’s a hint of tension in the air, as the Skylab is rumoured to return to earth during the same weekend – in either Brittany or Perth. This hilarious multi-generational comedy is seen largely through the eyes of 10 year old Albertine – playing perhaps the character of a young Julie Delpy. The adults’ behaviour is always colourful, often outrageous. Director, and star Julie Delpy shows a loving, guiding hand throughout proceedings.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: France

Director: Julie Delpy

Screenwriter: Julie Delpy

Cast: Chloe Antoni (Valerie), Aure Atika (Tante Linette), Aramis Bakchev-Arce (Arthur), Paul Bandey (Richard), Luc Bernard (Tonton Joseph), Sandrine Bodernes (Chantal), Valerie Bonneton (Tante Micheline), Pierre-Louis Bozonnet (Romain), Jerome Chappatte (Jean-Jacques), Jean-Louis Coulloc’h (Tonton Fredo), Patrick Poivre d’Arvor (himself), Lee Delong (Jessica), Albert Delpy (Tonton Hubert), Julie Delpy (Anna), Eric Elmosnino (Jean dit JAcquot), Christian Erickson (Toby), Michelle Goddet (Tante Suzette), Noah Huntley (Jonathan), Maxime Julliand (Pierre), Anthony Kimmerle (Matthhieu), Vincent Lacoste (Christian), Bernadette Lafont (Mamie Amandine), Noemie Lvosky (Tante Monique), Denis Menochet (Tonton Roger), Leo Michel-Freundlich (Robert), Frances Mitterrand (himself), Anne-Charlotte Moquet (Catherine), Felicien Moquet (Jean-Luc), Sophie Quinton (Tante Clementine), Emmanuelle Riva (Mme Prevost), Marc Ruchmann (Tonton Loulou), Candide Sanchez (Tonton Gustavo), Lily Savey (Sissi), Angelo Souny (Henri), Antoine Yvard (Philippe)

Runtime: 113 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Skylab’ Review: Please check Episode #24 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Skylab’.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Imposter′: Nil.

Rating: N/A

IMDB Rating:Le Skylab (2011) on IMDb