Monthly Archives: July 2015

Aussie Rules The World

Seeing he is both a tragic film geek and a football nut there was no way that Subculture Entertainment’s Dave Griffiths was going to let the release of the brand new documentary Aussie Rules The World go by without covering it.

Dave caught up with the filmmaker behind the docco, Michael McIntyre, to see how hard it was to make a documentary about the spread of AFL overseas.

You can listen to or download our Aussie Rules The World – Michael McIntyre interview right here.

FeatureManny Lewis

With the release of new romantic comedy Manny Lewis on DVD Subculture Entertainment’s Dave Griffiths decided to talk to screenwriter and star of the film Carl Barron.

During the interview Dave chats to Carl about a range of topics including where the idea for Manny Lewis came from and how easy it was to make the switch from stand up comedian to lead actor.

You can to listen to or download our Carl Barron interview right here.

Paper Towns

Summary: Based on a novel by John Green Paper Towns tells the story of Quentin Jacobson (Nat Wolff) and Margo Roth Spiegelman (Cara Delevingne) who have grown up living in houses opposite each other. When they were kids they were inseparable friends who did everything together, but after the pair found a body of a man who had committed suicide and Margo became wrapped up in solving the mystery of the man’s life the pair started to drift apart.

Now they are seniors at High School. Quentin is a safe student who has focused on becoming a doctor, getting married and having children while hanging out with his somewhat geeky friends, Radar (Justice Smith) and Ben (Austin Abrams). Meanwhile Margo has become one of the most popular girls in school, dated by the popular boys and hanging out with her best friend, the beautiful Lacey Pemberton (Halston Sage).

Suddenly after years apart Margo reaches out to Quentin to help her on one night of ‘crime’ as she gets revenge on her adulterous boyfriend and his friends, then she simply disappears meaning for once his life Quentin is the one with a mystery to solve.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 16th July 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Jack Schreier

Screenwriter: John Green (novel), Scott Neustadter, Michael H. Weber

Cast: Austin Abrams (Ben), Hannah Alligood (Young Margo), Ryan Boz (Young Quentin 14), Cara Buono (Mrs. Jacobsen), Caitlin Carver (Becca), Josiah Cerio (Young Quentin), Meg Crosbie (Ruthie), Stevie Ray Dallimore (Mr. Jacobsen), Cara Delevingne (Margo), Ansel Elgort (Mason), Griffin Freeman (Jase), Tom Hillmann (Mr. Spiegelman), Lance Lovegrove (Robert Joyner), Drew Matthews (Gus), Kendall McIntyre (Ben At Age 12), Susan Mackie Miller (Mrs. Spiegelman), Halston Sage (Lacey), RJ Shearer (Chuck), Jaz Sinclair (Angela), Justice Smith (Radar), Nat Wolff (Quentin)

Runtime: 109 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR PAPER TOWNS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

There will not be a film that frustrates you as much this year as Paper Towns will. The film starts off, as the trailer suggests, as a well written teenage mystery, in the vain of a modern day Secret Seven or Famous Five, but then just as the film starts to get interesting it simply peters out with one of the weakest endings you are ever likely to see.

The disappointing thing is that director Jake Schreier (who directed the brilliant Robot & Frank) and a screenwriting team that boast The Spectacular Now and (500) Days Of Summer on their resume draw you in really early and have you loving this film in a way that suggests it could be one of your favorite films of the year. For once they seemed to have created very realistic characters with their own individual personalities. There are no clean cut Hollywood teens here, instead you get genuinely confused high school kids that show all the personality traits of the kids that you went to school with, including that kid that was obsessed by sex and saw every women (including his friend’s Mums) as a chance.

As a result you find yourself really barracking for these realistic characters so when Margot disappears you invest a lot of interest in whether or not Quentin can find her. But is here that the writing in this film falls away completely. It seems that as soon as the characters embark on their road trip all the suspense and drama of this film just goes completely out the window, and not even a near miss car accident can re-ignite it. Really the road trip should have started a lot earlier and been the main focus of the film but instead it becomes a rushed effort during which all the good characterization seems to simply disappear and important moments in the lives of the characters are just brushed over really, really quickly.

Then comes the final insult a finale that you both want to praise and criticize. First off you want to congratulate the creative team behind the film for not going with the traditional American ending that you would expect with a teenage romance, but at the same time the ending frustrates you so much that you feel that the only way the filmmakers could appease themselves is by delivering one of those dreaded sequels that gives you some insight into what happens to the characters when they go off to college (or whatever one in particular decides to do).

The one thing that Paper Towns does deliver though is some future stars. Nat Wolff steps up from Fault In Our Stars and takes over the lead role pretty well, while Cara Delevingne really shows just how far she has come in her short career with a commanding performance that shows that she may well follow in the footsteps of Jennifer Lawrence and Shailene Woodley and use a teenage flick like this to launch her into much better things acting wise. Then there is Halston Sage, who despite her smaller role manages to steal a lot of scenes, especially with a strong emotional scene set in a bath tub of all places. With her good looks and great acting skills Sage certainly has a big career ahead of her.

While early on Paper Towns threatens to be a teenage flick as good as The Spectacular Now or The First Time it ends up disappointing its audience with a melancholy finale and some really lame road trip scenes. Somewhere along the creative line something dreadful happened with Paper Towns and this once promising film just falls by the wayside, sad but true.

 

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Greg King:

You can hear Greg’s full Paper Towns review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138

 

Stars(3.5)

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Paper Towns (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Ruben Guthrie reviews: You can listen to our Paper Towns review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138. You can also read our Paper Towns review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt

Trailer:

Ruben Guthrie

Summary: 

On the outside it looks like Ruben Guthrie (Patrick Brammall) has it all made. After just picking up another major Advertising Award he returns home to Sydney to have a house party to celebrate. But when his swimsuit model girlfriend Zoya (Abbey Lee) watches him once again take the regular trek of getting drunk before injuring himself while jumping off the roof of his mansion into a pool his life comes crashing down.

Horrified at the near miss Zoya sets him an ultimatum. She heads back overseas and tells him not to come and find her until he has gone twelve months sober. Ruben thinks it will be easy and while he is at first reluctant to join an Alcoholic Anonymous group he soon finds one that has him opening up as he gets closer to the very hippy-like Virginia (Harriet Dyer).

But while Ruben starts feeling really good he soon finds those around him disagree. Soon his parents Peter (Jack Thompson), Susan (Robyn Nevin) and his best friend Damian (Alex Dimitriades) are always trying to get him to drink, as is his boss (Jeremy Sims) who feels that his sobriety has taken away his edge.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 16th July 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Brendan Cowell

Screenwriter: Brendan Cowell

Cast: Natasha Beaumont (Sheridan), Blazey Best (Janelle), Patrick Brammall (Ruben Guthrie), Yvonne Cowell (Vonny), Alex Dimitriades (Damian), Harriet Dyer (Virginia), Leon Ford (Dimitri), Katie Gavin (Laura), Michael Lahoud (Jeremy), Abby Lee (Zoya), Francis Mossman (Lorenzo Oil), Robyn Neven (Susan), Elly Oh (Sun Ye), Jeremy Sims (Ray), Billy Thompson (Harry), Jack Thompson (Peter), Brenton Thwaites (Chet)

Runtime: 90 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR RUBEN GUTHRIE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

There is nothing quite as disappointing as a film that has so much potential but then fails at the last few hurdles – sadly that also the best way to describe new Australian film Ruben Guthrie. The film comes from a brilliant stable, based on a well received theatre play from one of Australia’s top writers and actors Brendan Cowell so therefore it is completely head scratching at why the film leaves itself open to so much criticism.

Having said that though Ruben Guthrie is not the complete mess that many critics would have you believe, misguided perhaps, but a mess… no way. To its credit Ruben Guthrie is nowhere near as bad as what its trailer makes it look and there are more than enough times throughout the film that it manages to win you over. There are some deeply touching scenes as the audience watches a man try to overcome his inner demons while his family and friends don’t seem to want to allow him to heal. Then there is also the fantastic soundtrack put together by Sarah Blasko that is so haunting it brings back flashes off the fantastic Somersault soundtrack from all those years ago.

But for every good thing about Ruben Guthrie something ugly raises its head. Stupid little questions like why does a raging alcoholic keep a well stocked bar going while he is trying to give up alcohol? They may seem small but they are the kinds of things that can really make a film like this seem less believable. Then there are the walking clichés. As if Jeremy Sims’ portrayal of an advertising executive isn’t cringe worthy enough then there is the over-the-top portrayal of a gay character, a shame when Alex Dimitriades has played such a realistic gay character in the amazing film Head On a few years ago. Sadly for Dimitriades here it is sad to take his character seriously because of the bad directing and screenwriting, it may have been supposed to make him look like a bully boy that the audience hated but the result is such a clichéd mincy character that most of the times the audience finds themselves laughing at him instead of hating him.

It seems such a shame that the film has problems like that when Cowell (who also directs here) manages to overcome the biggest problem of all – and that is to get the audience on side with Ruben Guthrie. At the start of this film he is a despicable character. He is a complete prick and you wonder how on Earth there will ever be a time when you find yourself barracking for him. But somehow Cowell manages to overcome that problem, and even when Ruben is starting a relationship with Virginia despite his promise to Zoya you can’t help but once again want to see him succeed. Yes this is a very schizophrenic script with its massive amount of ups and downs.

If nothing else Ruben Guthrie does set the path for young actor Patrick Brammall to really make a name for himself. The youngster has really crafted a way for himself with some great performances on television in shows like Glitch and Upper Middle Bogan etc, but here he manages to find just the right mix of dramatic and comedic acting to suggest that he may become the next Australian export overseas. Star-on-the-rise Brenton Thwaites is massively under-used however a newly found talent is discovered with Harriet Dyer who manages to steal the scene on a number of occasions. Aussie acting legends Jack Thompson and Robyn Nevin also just breeze through the roles providing a couple of laughs along the way.

Sadly Ruben Guthrie isn’t nearly as strong as it should have been. The screenplay raises too many questions for the audience to talk about once they leave the cinema and you really feel that the film doesn’t explore the notion of Australian culture and alcoholism to the full extent it should have been. Not a complete waste of time but could have been a lot better.

 

 

Stars(2.5)

 

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Ruben Guthrie review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

Stars(1)

 

 

 

Nick Gardener:

You can hear Nick’s full Ruben Guthrie review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138

 

Stars(2)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(2)

 

IMDB Rating: Ruben Guthrie (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Ruben Guthrie reviews: You can listen to our Ruben Guthrie review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138. You can also read our Ruben Guthrie review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt

Trailer:

Women He's Undressed

Summary: Orry-Kelly was Golden Age Hollywood’s most celebrated costume designer. Winner of three Academy Awards and responsible for the costumes of films as iconic as Some Like It Hot, Casablanca, An American in Paris, and Auntie Mame, Orry-Kelly was head of Warner Brothers costume department during the richest period of American film history.

And he was born in Kiama, New South Wales.

Acclaimed filmmaker Gillian Armstrong brings to life the tale of one of Australia’s undeservedly forgotten sons in her new documentary WOMEN HE’S UNDRESSED. The story of Orry-Kelly becomes one of discovery and intrigue, as Armstrong charts the trajectory of this most unusual and talented man. He was outrageous, witty, outspoken, a drinker, and uncompromising of his sexuality at a time when Hollywood was deeply conservative. From costuming Hollywood’s most glamourous actresses, to a scandalous secret affair with one of film’s most famous and iconic actors, WOMEN HE’S UNDRESSED uncovers a rollercoaster of a life sure to fascinate, shock and illuminate.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 16th July 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Gillian Armstrong

Screenwriter: Katherine Thomson

Cast: Louis Alexander (Young Orry), Tyler Coppin (Walter Plunkett/Jimmy Fidler/Sergeant), Lara Cox (Ginger Rogers), Jeanette Cronin (Bette Davis), Darren Gilshenan (Orry-Kelly), Sandy Gore (Hedda Hopper/Louella Parsons), Deborah Kennedy (Florence Kelly), Ted Maynard (Jack Warner), Nathaniel Middleton (The Lover), Paige Walker (Kay Francis), David E. Woodley (William Kelly)

Runtime: 99 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR WOMEN HE’S UNDRESSED REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Women He’s Undressed review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

Stars(3.5)

 

 

 

Nick Gardener:

You can hear Nick’s full Women He’s Undressed review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138

 

Stars(3.5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Women He's Undressed (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Women He’s Undressed reviews: You can listen to our Women He’s Undressed review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138.

Trailer:

Ant-Man

Summary: Life isn’t going well for Scott Lang (Paul Rudd). After famously being arrested for a modern day Robin Hood crime his release from prison finds himself unable to keep down a job – a big issue since his ex-wife, Maggie (Judy Greer), and her new partner Police Detective Paxton (Bobby Cannavale) won’t give him any form of custody to his daughter, Cassie (Abby Ryder Forsten).

He finally gives in to his best friend’s urges and decides to help out with a heist that suddenly finds him being recruited by Dr. Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) to become ‘Ant-Man.’ While Pym’s daughter, Hope (Evangeline Lilly), thinks it is a bad idea soon Scott is being trained to help prevent the money hungry Darren Cross (Corey Stoll) from selling technology that is destined to be used for evil.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 16th July 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Peyton Reed

Screenwriter: Edgar Wright, Joe Cornish, Adam McKay, Paul Rudd, Stan Lee (comic), Jack Kirby (comic), Larry Lieber (comic)

Cast: Hayley Atwell (Peggy Carter), Carlos Aviles (Carlos), Nicholas Barrera (Ernesto), Bobby Cannavale (Paxton), Joe Chrest (Frank), Robert Crayton (Peachy), David Dastmalchian (Kurt), Martin Donovan (Mitchell Carson), Michael Douglas (Dr. Hank Pym), Chris Evans (Steve Rogers/Captain America), Abby Ryder Fortson (Cassie Lang), Judy Greer (Maggie Lang), Dax Griffin (Young Pym), Wood Harris (Gale), Tom Kenny (Hideous Rabbit), Lyndsi LaRose (Emily), Evangeline Lilly (Hope van Dyne), Anthony Mackie (Sam Wilson/Falcon), Cesar Mendoza (Gabriel), Jordi Molla (Castillo), Michael Pena (Luis), Paul Rudd (Scott Lang/Ant-Man), John Slattery (Howard Stark), Sebastian Stan (Bucky Barnes), Corey Stoll (Darren Cross/Yellowjacket), T.I. (Dave), Gregg Turkington (Dale), Danny Vasquez (Ignacio)

Runtime: 117 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR ANT-MAN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

The Marvel universe has been chugging along quick nicely for a while now. The franchise has peaked with amazing films like Guardians Of The Galaxy and Captain America: Winter Soldier and even it’s weaker films, Thor 2 etc, are films that are worth more than one watch. But now comes the film that many would consider the problem child for Marvel, Ant-Man.

So why is Ant-Man the film that seems to have been causing Marvel the most amount of trouble. Well first of all the fanboys have been all over the film, criticizing the casting of Paul Rudd (like they did with Robert Downey Jnr. before Iron Man) and seemingly being outraged that they would even entertain inserting comedy into the film (yep because nobody had a chuckle during Guardians Of The Galaxy). But like is the case with so many problem children the real root of the issue was happening behind closed doors. See Ant-Man was supposed to be a Edgar Wright film. Yes the man who is largely responsible for the Cornetto Trilogy was supposed to be at the helm, but because he didn’t fall into Marvel’s line found himself turfed out and replaced with Peyton Reed (the man who brought us Bring It On), but the good news is that despite all this upheaval Ant-Man turns out to be a pretty decent film.

Now before you go into the cinema to feat on Ant-Man be aware that the problems behind the scenes have resulted in Ant-Man being very different to any of the other films in the Marvel universe, but that actually ends up being a good thing. Gone are the epic scenes of large flying ships crashing to Earth or the destruction of a major city and instead we are left with an action packed scene that occurs in a little girl’s bedroom but will have you laughing out loud as a giant Thomas The Tank Engine goes crashing out of the side of the house. Yes it is scenes like that has Edgar Wright’s finger prints all over it.

There are things that let Ant-Man down a little, the most annoying being that Michael Pena and Bobby Cannavale are simply playing walking clichés, but the plusses certainly outweigh the negatives. The screenwriting team have inserted the much needed heart that was missing from Avengers: Age Of Ultron as both Hank and Scott try to repair the relationships with their daughters while the well-written script has allows some of the cast to bring their A-Game to the acting stakes as well.

Yes that is right everybody it seems that throughout this film that Michael Douglas forgets that he is in a comic book movie and actually turns up his acting output to that of what we recently saw in Arbitrage. Douglas is on fire here and it seems to have a carry on affect on some of the actors around him as well. Evangeline Lilly brilliantly plays a character with divided loyalty and it is Hope that much of the suspense centres around. Is she really on Pym and Scott’s side or is her loyalty to Darren Cross more than what they bargained for? She plays the double agent well and you can only hope that both her and Douglas are used more in the Avengers franchise now.

Then there is Paul Rudd, who as I previously mentioned had the fanboys baying for his blood before the film was even released. Now I will admit that I was skeptical about Paul Rudd’s ability to play an action hero, but he well and truly made me eat my words with his performance. Rudd not got buff for the role but seems to become Ant-Man with complete ease. He manages to pull off the action sequences awesomely well, while it is also some of his quick wit and one liners that make the film a please to watch. Apparently we should also be thanking him for helping the script run smoothly after Wright’s departure… so Mr. Rudd from the bottom of our heart we thank you.

So the best way to approach Ant-Man is to go into the cinema not expecting anything like you have seen in the Marvel universe to date. Yes Ant-Man has two Avengers appear (one in the main frame of the film, the other in the credits) and there are a few references to the Avengers and Spider-Man, but this is very much a film that is out there on its own. Yes this is a child that is very different to its siblings, but sometimes they make the best friends, right? Ant-Man is enjoyable enough to make you hope that the character appears again somewhere… very soon.

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Adam Ross:

You can hear Adam’s full Ant-Man review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Ant-Man review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

Stars(4)

 

 

 

Nick Gardener:

You can hear Nick’s full Ant-Man review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Ant-Man (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Ant-Man reviews: You can listen to our Ant-Man review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138. You can also read our Ant-Man review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.  There is also an alternative Ant-Man review on Heavy Cinema.

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at  new release films ‘Women He Has Undressed,’ ‘Insidious Chapter 3,’ ‘Paper Towns,‘ ‘Gett: The Trial Of Vivian Amsalem,’ ‘Ruben Guthrie’ and ‘Ant-Man.’ This episode also contains interviews with Stefanie Scott, Nat Wolff, Cara Delevingne, Paul Rudd, Evangeline Lilly, Brendan Cowell and Patrick Brammall.

To listen to the show or can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Emilia Clarke 2

We take a look at who were the most popular stars online this week.

  1. Emilia Clarke
  2. Bryce Dallas Howard
  3. Amanda Peterson
  4. Chris Pratt
  5. Tom Hardy
  6. Eva Green
  7. Margot Robbie
  8. Joe Manganiello
  9. Rachel McAdams
  10. Taryn Manning
  11. Arnold Schwarzeneggar
  12. Jai Courtney
  13. Channing Tatum
  14. Taylor Kitsch
  15. Shailene Woodley
  16. Amber Heard Depp
  17. Alexandra Daddario
  18. Jennifer Lawrence
  19. Britt Robertson
  20. Sofia Vergara
  21. Scott Eastwood
  22. Bella Thorne
  23. Matt Bomer
  24. Omar Sharif
  25. Cara Delevingne

Terminator Genisys

We take a look at the most popular movies and television shows online over the past week.

 

  1. Terminator Genisys (2015) – Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jason Clarke, Emilia Clarke, Jai Courtney
  2. Magic Mike XXL (2015) – Channing Tatum, Joe Manganiello, Matt Bomer, Adam Rodriguez
  3. Minions (2015) – Sandra Bullock, Jon Hamm, Michael Keaton, Pierre Coffin
  4. Jurassic World (2015) – Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard, Ty Simpkins, Judy Greer
  5. True Detective (2014) – Vince Vaughn, Colin Farrell, Rachel McAdams, Taylor Kitsch
  6. Orange Is The New Black (2013) – Taylor Schilling, Danielle Brooks, Taryn Manning, Emma Myles
  7. Inside Out (2015) – Amy Poehler, Bill Hader, Lewis Black, Mindy Kaling
  8. Ant-Man (2015) – Paul Rudd, Michael Douglas, Corey Stoll, Evangeline Lilly
  9. Game Of Thrones (2011) – Emilia Clarke, Peter Dinklage, Kit Harington, Lena Headey
  10. Batman vs Superman: Dawn Of Justice (2016) – Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Jesse Eisenberg
  11. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 (2015) – Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson
  12. Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) – Tom Hardy, Charlize Theron, Nicholas Hoult, Zoe Kravitz
  13. Ted 2 (2015) – Mark wahlberg, Seth MacFarlane, Amanda Seyfried, Jessica Barth
  14. Mr. Robot (2015) – Rami Malek, Carly Chaikin, Portia Doubleday, Martin Wallstrom
  15. The Gallows (2015) – Reese Mishley, Pfeifer Brown, Ryan Shoos, Cassidy Gifford
  16. Spy (2015) – Melissa McCarthy, Rose Byrne, Jude Law, Jason Statham
  17. Goosebumps (2015) – Odeya Rush, Dylan Minnette, Halston Sage, Jack Black
  18. From Dusk Til Dawn (2014) – D.J. Cotrona, Zane Holtz, Jesse Garcia, Eiza Gonzalez
  19. Snowden (2015) – Shailene Woodley, Scott Eastwood, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Nicolas Cage
  20. Kingsman: The Secret Service (2014) – Colin Firth, Taron Egerton, Samuel L. Jackson, Michael Caine
  21. Sense8 (2015) – Aml Ameen, Doona Bae, Jamie Clayton, Tina Desai
  22. The Longest Ride (2015) – Scott Eastwood, Britt Robertson, Alan Alda, Jack Huston
  23. Stars Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens (2015) – Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, Adam Driver
  24. Insurgent (2015) – Shailene Woodley, Ansel Elgort, Theo James, Kate Winslet
  25. Pretty Little Liars (2010) – Troian Bellisario, Ashley Benson, Lucy Hale, Shay Mitchell

Soilwork

The metal legends that are Soilwork are about to release their brand new album, The Ride Majestic, so Subculture Entertainment’s Dave Griffiths caught up with Bjorn ‘Speed’ Strid to take about this brand new album… that has been described as Soilwork’s heaviest and darkest work to date.

You can listen to or download our Soilwork interview right here.