Monthly Archives: January 2020

Rock quintet INTECHNICOLOUR have released a video for the new single ‘Big Sleeper’, the title-track from their debut album which is due for release on 21st February 2020 via Big Scary Monsters.

Guitarist Dave Jackson comments on the single:

“This song used to be called ‘Sexy Boys’ but we changed it to ‘Big Sleeper’ in a vein attempt to increase our chances of getting on Top Of The Pops…then we realised the programme had been cancelled and regretted our decision terribly!”

INTECHNICOLOUR will play a series of headline shows in February, March and April in support of the new album, joined by CLT DRP and Operation Kino on select dates.

19.02.2020 – Glasgow, Broadcast (w/ CLT DRP)
20.02.2020 – Bristol, The Exchange (w/ CLT DRP)
21.02.2020 – London, The Black Heart (w/ CLT DRP)
22.02.2020 – Southampton, Heartbreaker’s (w/ CLT DRP)
23.02.2020 – Brighton, The Pipeline (w/ Operation Kino)
26.03.2020 – Worthing, Bar 42 (w/ Operation Kino)
27.03.2020 – Tunbridge Wells, Forum Basement (w/ Operation Kino)
28.03.2020 – Hastings, Crawley’s (w/ Operation Kino)
23.04.2020 – Cheltenham, Frog And Fiddle (w/ Operation Kino)

Hailing from Brighton, INTECHNICOLOUR are a riffy, groovy, rock band with a knack for creating a colourful song or two. Formed in 2015 through a want to play loud music through slightly broken amps, the basis of the band was created.

Comprised of members from the likes of Delta Sleep, LUO and Broker the five-piece are a fully-formed band of technically gifted musicians, cutting loose and playing music that’s about as far removed from their day jobs as it’s possible to get – and they are doing it better than a good portion of their contemporaries. Landing somewhere between the slack desert-groove of Kyuss and Karma to Burn, the band combine deeply satisfying riffs with a dynamic vocal style, which calls to mind the sounds of Baroness, Gojira and Mastodon.

The band have previously been quoted as saying that they “literally have nothing to say about themselves,” but with music this good, it’s highly likely that there’ll be plenty of others willing to do the talking for them.

INTECHNICOLOUR have previously toured across the UK and Europe with the likes of Physics House Band, Black Peaks, Town Portal, Bitch Falcon and Haggard Cat. The band concluded 2019 with a performance at Big Scary Monsters’ Xmas Party, with headline dates confirmed in support of the album.

 

The year was 1979 and a tiny Irish punk band were about to send out a shockwave that would not only change the genre but forever impact on the wider music scene. Surprisingly the band responsible – Belfast’s very own Stiff Little Fingers – had no idea what they about to do.

How could they? Things were not exactly going the greatest for them. The band had started out in 1977 as a rock cover band called Highway Star but then after a few line-up changes they were introduced to the sound that was punk. That lead to a brief flirtation with the name The Fast before finally settling on Stiff Little Fingers.

The uprising and violence that Ireland was experiencing at the time ended up heavy influencing the early music of Stiff Little Fingers and after recording some of their tracks in a studio normally reserved for the creation of radio jingles the band signed with Island Records, a deal which fell through.

Not to be put off the band released some cassette singles, the ‘cassette bomb’ that was ‘Suspect Device’ did cause some problems at publications it arrived at, and eventually signed with Rough Trade Records, a deal which ultimately saw part of the rise of Chrysalis Records.

That led to the release of their debut album Inflammable Material and the rest as they say is musical history. Audiences took to the album that explored deep topics such as police oppression, sectarian violence and teenage boredom and the result was the first independent album to ever chart in the UK.

“We didn’t think anything about it,” said vocalist Jake Burns who I recently had the pleasure of sitting down and talking to about the anniversary of this stunning album. “I don’t think anybody ever does, but there seemed to be a lot of time to talk about this album. People have said to me ‘did you realise that it was going to be a classic?’ or ‘did you know you know you were recording something special?’ The answer to both of those questions is no!”

“As far as we were concerned we had already been turned by literally every record label in the country. It was only through the good graces of Rough Trade saying ‘you’ve never made an album, we’ve never made an album, so let’s see what happens.’ It was a shot in the dark for them, it was a huge leap of faith for them to take us. But as far as we were concerned we had been shot down by all of these labels so this was our last shot, I think from my point of view I thought that at least if we recorded them then in forty years time when I was sitting down with my grandchildren I could be like ‘here take a listen to what I did when I was young and stupid.’ Of course flash forward forty-two years and I haven’t got any kids, let alone grandkids and I’m talking to you about it instead.”

What Inflammable Material did when it comes to musical history though is not lost on Burns. “The thing did go on to become successful on so many levels. If I knew that was going to become the case though we would have tried to bottle it, it just happened to be the right time and the right place.”

One of the ironies that followed the success of the album was that nearly all of the record labels that originally knocked back the band then came knocking. “Everyone one of them except CBS came back,” says Burns with a laugh. “We heard that CBS didn’t come back because in their words they said ‘we have enough trouble with The Clash’ which I thought was a wonderful thing for them to say about us.”

But yeah everybody else came back and it was a wonderful experience for our point of view because we were as green as grass,” he continues. “We had no experience in the music business at all. Had we been signed straight off the bat we probably would have signed the world’s worst record deal and we would have gone down that path of ‘well we did all this work and we got nothing out of it.’ I was working as an Accounts Clerk before the band took off and I could have been back doing that again, it could been like that. But the deal we did with Rough Trade, who was just as green as us, was done on a handshake that covered the costs and then we split fifty-fifty and by the end of the year the thing had sold 100,000 copies. So when these labels came back to us they were like ‘well we will give you ridiculously large advances’ but the joy of working with Rough Trade was that we didn’t have to wait for the traditional eighteen months to get paid because they were selling them themselves so we were paid straight away… so the one thing we didn’t need from the labels was money but what we did want was control over the albums so we could control what they sounded like.”

“As it turned out Chrysalis were the only label that would give us that, the others were all like ‘we’ll give you seventy five thousand pounds’ and we were like ‘we don’t want seventy five thousand pounds you’re not listening.’ But Chrysalis were like ‘okay’ and we had a really good working relationship with them. We have been pretty lucky though people have normally ‘got’ the band straightaway or have gotten on board pretty quickly so we’ve been pretty lucky.”

Despite that early success it was the deal with Chrysalis that saw Stiff Little Fingers become members of a very different league. “Rough Trade were one of the most major independent labels but all the other bands they had would make a single or do two singles and then go off it never seemed like a long term thing,” Burns explains. “No disrespect to the other bands but there were no rock ‘n’ roll legends there you weren’t going to meet The Beatles when you walked in and then over night we signed with Chrysalis and then I found myself being introduced to Rory Gallagher my hero and we were on the same level as Blondie and the same level as Jethro Tull and I was suddenly like ‘wait a second these are the guys that were in the music magazines I read when I was growing up and they are talking to me like I am there equal.’ That was when I said to myself, damn I guess this is my job now.”

They were obviously the bands that Burns himself were in awe of but over recent years bands such as Bad Religion and Rancid have mentioned that Stiff Little Fingers were a major influence on their early work and that is something you can tell that Burns is incredibly proud of. “That is very flattering,” he says with humility present in his voice. “It is always very flattering when you hear a musician say that because I know how I felt when I first met Rory Gallagher, he was just charm and friendliness personified and if I mentioned what a fan I was he would look embarrassed and say ‘oh, don’t be like that’ so we’re kind of the same. I mean I met Robert Plant from Led Zeppelin, for pete’s sake they don’t get much bigger, and we were doing a television show together… this silly little quiz thing. On the form you filled out before you went on it said ‘what was the first album you ever bought?’ and I wrote Led Zeppelin II which was true and I didn’t know then that Robert Plant was going to be on the show and then he walked into the green room and all eyes turned to him because everyone is saying ‘it’s fucking Robert Plant’ and he stood in the doorway and said ‘who is the idiot who bought my record?’ and I was like ‘me.’”

“I guess because those guys were so cool about it when it first started happening to us we were like ‘okay let’s go get a beer let’s not talk about that’, he says. “Internally though you are impressed, I mean those bands you mentioned we’ve toured with both Rancid and Bad Religion and they are both great bands, so yeah it is very flattening.”

Today Stiff Little Fingers are still together with founding members Jake Burns and Ali McMordie still at the helm. The band will be touring Australia this year and to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of Inflammable Material will be playing the album in full. Yes everybody, this is a return to the good old days of punk.

 

 

Since its arrival on the stages of Boston’s heavy scene in 2006 Revocation have become a band who have used their unique blend of thrash and death metal to repeatedly change the sound of the genre. That time period has seen them deliver seven studio albums including the Lovecraft inspired The Outer Ones which gained the band worldwide attention.

Now as the band travels to Australia to tour with the mighty Cattle Decapitation we were lucky enough to get the opportunity to sit down and reflect on the band’s career to date with frontman David Davidson.

“It was awesome we played with so many different bands in the metal realm and in the punk scene,” says Davidson talking about Revocation’s early days in the Boston live scene. “We would be doing club shows and small bars, then we worked our way up to the bigger clubs, places like Great Scot and Middle East. That was a cool kind of stepping stone for us because we were like ‘oh wow we are playing at a 200 capped room rather than a 50 capped room.’ Playing at a 200 capped room was a really big deal, but then we were also playing basement shows at these random warehouse shows with punk rock bands and there were random house parties and stuff.”

“It was really cool to be part of that scene because all my friends were part of the music scene in all different ways,” he says continuing. “That made it cool because any given weekend we were all bouncing around at different shows right across the Boston scene.”

At that time Davidson and the band made the decision to change their name from Cryptic Warning to Revocation and even then the band thought that something special was going to happen. “I think it was always the goal,” says Davidson as we talk about whether or not the band ever thought they would reach the point where they were touring the world. “I’m not sure we ever thought it would come into fruition or not because it was hard to tell back them. But I always thought possibly if we remained focussed and I knew there was something special to the music, so I just figured that if I kept grinding it out, kept going, kept honing my craft then eventually people would notice, and yes it has become a career for me.”

The band have had many highlights over the years including touring with the likes of Cannibal Corpse. Their albums now regularly chart with their Deathless and Great Is Our Sin albums both hitting the Top Ten on the US Hard Rock charts. Then came the praise for their last album – The Outer Ones. Those moments certainly aren’t lost on Davidson and the rest of the band.

“When we first started out it was hard to see the trajectory that the band was going to take,” he explains. “We were just writing music for ourselves and to some extent that is what I still do, I have to let the music speak to me first and foremost before I think how it will affect anybody else. We’re not a band that thinks about writing for a particular fan base or anything like that it is really about satisfying this creative drive that we have and to me that is important because then I know that it comes from an honest place.”

“With The Outer Ones it was really just us embracing the death metal aesthetic that has been part of our band since day one but really just turning up the dial on it and really going head on into that death metal realm,” he tells me as we continue to talk about just how well received the tracks have been off the album.

That leads me to ask him how the tracks have been going live and what they have planned for their Australian shows. “The response to the music whether it is on the record or live has been really phenomenal,” he says. “We can’t wait to get to play them Australia so the Australian crowds can witness them, the material is obviously very aggressive because it is super heavy, but we’ll have some twists and turns in there and a few surprises thrown in as well. I think it is going to be a blast playing these tracks for the Australian crowds.”

“It is impossible to play everything,” Davidson continues as we discuss the amazing back catalogue that the band has to chose from these days. “What we do with each new release is primarily focus on the new material. I like that playbook rather than when bands just rehash song from a long time ago. I love it when they explore the new material and we are very passionate about the new material. Whenever we do a new record I think because it is so fresh to us we want to play it so we’ve been leaning pretty heavy on the new material to keep it fresh for us and to keep it fresh for the fans. We’ll also throw in a couple of crowd pleasers here and there so they can expect some new stuff with some crowd pleasers thrown in for good measure.”

The more you listen to Revocation the more you realise that this is band that certainly deserves more respect than they seem to get. With some amazing albums already in their back pocket and this tour with Cattle Decapitation about to hit our shores it seems like now is the right time to discover Revocation if you aren’t already a fan.

 

 

 

You wouldn’t know it if you walked past but nestled away behind some shops in Pier Street Altona sits one of the Melbourne’s most exciting recording studios. Owned and operated by Melbourne musician Mat Robins Coloursound Recording Studio is already beginning to carve out a history for itself in the Melbourne music scene as bands like The Baby Animals and The Dandy Warhols have already used its services.

Talking to Robins you release that this is a man that lives and breathes music, it runs through his veins and the passion in obvious in his voice. “I think like anyone I kind of just fell into it,” he says when I ask how he started out in the music industry. “Everyone has a drive or passion for something and they usually steer a way towards that so for me it was playing in bands as a kid, and I still play in bands now, but when I was playing in bands as a kid I was always looking over the shoulder of the engineer in the studio. I was always very much wanting to know about that stuff but not really understanding it, but over time you just take those small steps forward and you try stuff and you tick off stuff and then that turns into what it is today… whatever that is going to be, for me that is running a studio and managing artists… and I love it, it is a great thing.”

Robins’ musical journey begun with his parents listing to ELO and The Beatles at home and then turned to him starting his first band during his teenage years with the 90s grunge inspired Thimble Eye, today he is a member of Cicada Stone who recently played in a Bushfire Relief Concert for Silverback Touring.

Now he spreads his time across Cicada Stone and Coloursound two things he really enjoys. “Coloursound in its current form has been in Altona for the last ten years, it has been a steady growth procession. My journey started at home, I was recording on anything that I could afford and then I kept upgrading and buying this and buying that, then we moved into a garage and then into a more permanent space here in Altona. The concept was that I didn’t want to set up a studio like everyone else’s studio. Years ago I went into Hothouse Studios in St Kilda for a session and I just loved the idea of a studio being hidden away on a main street, you have life at your fingertips, whatever you need is just outside and all the studios I had been in in the past had been in warehouses or backyards and life was quite difficult.”

“So what I wanted to do was set up a studio that emulated that whole Hothouse concept,” he says continuing. “So when I set up Coloursound it was based on that – it is on a main street, it is hidden away behind shops, it is right near a beach – it’s a really good spot. It’s not even a big studio – I’ve got a control room and a main room for tracking, a couple of isolation booths, but it is amazing what you can get away with in a dedicated small space. I don’t even have a lot of equipment, I’ve got a nice vintage console, some really tasty microphones, but it is not about the equipment it is about how you use the equipment and it is about how you approach the songs.”

As the studio has grown over the years Robins says he has had a number of highlights. “Highlights would have to include getting in anyone,” he says with a laugh. “I think it is a highlight that anyone would go ‘hey, I believe in you and I believe that you can do something with my song.’ That is the greatest compliment, but if I were to drop names we’ve had some great artists in here. Locally we’ve had bands like Palace Of The King and Warbirds come in recently. Some international bands that I’ve had have been I had The Dandy Warhols in here recording drums for an album they did a few years ago… that really blew me away to have a band of such a calibre recording in Melbourne, especially at my place. We’ve had Whitfield Crane come in and when those sessions happen you kind of sit back and think ‘Shit, I never thought I would have people like this in my place.’ I mean I had Suzi DeMarchi in here with The Baby Animals and it is pretty amazing when stuff like that happens.”

Of course along with the highlights come the challenges and Robins says he has faced some of them along the way as well. “Honestly the biggest challenge is keeping the doors open,” he admits. “And I think any studio will say that. On the outside every studio always looks busy, everybody is trying to make themselves look bigger than they are but the reality is it is a small industry here – it is very niche. And with modern technology the way that it is, and I am all for it, modern technology is taking the power out of the studio and into the home and that is a good thing, people should be expressing themselves and doing their own thing but it doesn’t help established studios keep the bills paid. So that has been the biggest hurdle – finding projects where bands want to invest into a studio. And also for bands to invest into albums is getting harder and harder to pick up, bands are happy to do the single or the EP but finding an album project seems to have got harder over the past few years, maybe it is the sign of the times – bands don’t really want to do albums anymore.”

Aside from offering recording services Robins has also started to run workshops at Coloursound where he can pass on valuable information to people looking to learn more about the industry. “Over my time I have learnt a lot,” he says humbly. “I always find that I love talking about this stuff and I just realised that there is nothing wrong with passing on this information so I set up a workshop and it is a good way to fill in the days that aren’t busy here and there is always someone who has reached that point where they need to have a breakthrough and doing this kind of workshop can certainly unlock that for someone. I know I would have loved that when I was teenager trying to learn this stuff at home, if there had been a weekend style workshop that I could have done that would have been great.”

Melbourne is lucky to have a studio like Coloursound so if you are looking to work on that next project you may want to go down and spend some time with Mat Robins to get it done.

 

The legendary Geoff Tate rose to fame with Queensryche but since he parted ways with them he has forged out a successful solo career as well as recording music with his band Sweet Oblivion. Now Tate is returning to his roots as he heads to Australia to perform the stunning Operation: Mindcrime album in its entirety.

When Subculture gets a chance to talk to Tate he is in a jovial mood, his infectious laughter right there from the very moment he says hello. We joke for a bit and then his level of seriousness rises as he begins to talk about all the ins and outs of the tour.

“This tour came about because I wanted to do a thirtieth anniversary tour for Operation: Mindcrime,” he explains. “I wanted to play it in its entirety and when  I started the tour I didn’t expect for it to last as long as it has. I’m surprised that it has but I also have to admit that I am very pleased that it has. I thought it would be like twelve weeks and then I would be moving onto something else, but it has been like thirty-six months and we’ve been across twenty-eight countries… it really has been something special.”

If you are thinking about going to see Tate perform Operation: Mindcrime then this will be your last opportunity. “Australia is going to be last,” he says. “The last few shows will be in Australia. I’m very happy about that because it is always great to come to Australia because we don’t get to come there very often. I was in Australia in June or July playing with a band called Avantasia on their world tour and I think this is going to be my third or fourth trip there so I am excited and looking forward to it.”

As we talk more Operation: Mindcrime as an album I find myself asking Tate what it was like when he first started rehearsing this album and had to go back and re-explore music he had written thirty years ago. “It was an enjoyable task actually,” he says with a hint of surprise in his voice. “You know I had to to go back to it and delve into it and really listen to it again to see what was there. And that was really interesting from my point of view because as time goes by you don’t re-visit the album as much as you just remember it when you play a song.”

“Because it was the thirtieth anniversary I wanted to really present it in a way that was more in line with how it was recorded,” he says continuing. “I really listened to it closely and figured out a lot of things that I had sort of forgotten that I did on previous tours and the different times I had visited the album. But this time I wanted to do more of an album like version of the songs. So that was quite different and quite enjoyable to go back and listen to it with fresh ears as well.”

Of course going back and exploring music written thirty years ago means that you can wake up old ghosts and Tate chuckles when I ask if it woke up any for him. “Yeah it was definitely a journey,” he says. “I was surprised that I could recognise the subject matter of the album is so similar to today. Even though thirty years has gone by and so much has changed and some things have changed like night and day, but I think the basic human qualities are the same, and I think that we still struggle with the same human issues… they are still there. We haven’t surpassed where we have been yet. There are still things like social justice, in terms of human beings dominating each other, the rich getting richer… that has all stayed the same. There isn’t much growth in that area and perhaps there never will be, that is just the way it is.”

One thing is for sure though when you go back and explore Operation: Mindcrime it is still an album that holds its own and is going to sound spectacular live. “All I can say is get ready,” warns Tate as we start to wrap up the interview. “This is going to be phenomenal; this is going to be everything that you hoped it would be. I can guarantee that this is going to be a great show, the band is excited and very well rehearsed and I feel like I’m on fire and ready to go.”

 

 

Summary: The Austrian Franz Jägerstätter, a conscientious objector, refuses to fight for the Nazis in World War II.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th January 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Germany, USA

Director: Terrence Malick

Screenwriter: Terrence Malick

Cast: Dimo Alexiev (Nikolai), Leo Baumgartner (Toni Strohhofer), Ulrich Brandhoff (Captain Jurgen), August Diehl (Franz Jagerstatter), Alexander Fehling (Lawyer Feldman), Johannes Gabl (Hessler), Bruno Ganz (Judge Lueban), Adolf Hitler (himself (archival footage)), Bernd Holscher (Judge Ranft), Moritz Katzmair (Martin), Waldemar Kobus (Warden Stein), Jonannes Krisch (Trakl – The Miller), Levan Khurtsia (Levan), Dieter Kosslick (Judge Musshoff), Aennie Lade (Loisi Jagerstatter), Katja Lechthaler (Frau Pate), Monika Lennartz (Frau Schuster), Johan Leyson (Ohlendorf – The Painter), Jasmine Barbara Mairhofer (Frau Pate), Max Malatesta (Max), Karl Marcovics (Mayor Kraus), Ulrich Matthes (Lorenz Schwaninger), Max Mauff (Sterz), Wolfgang Michael (Eckinger), Tobias Moretti (Fr. Furthauer), Thomas Mraz (Prosecuter Kleint), Ida Mutschlechner (Rosi Jagerstatter), Karin Neuhasuer (Rosalia Jagerstatter), Johannes Nussbaum (Josef), Michael Nyqvist (Bishop Fliesser), Valerie Pachner (Fani Jagerstatter), Oliver Pezzi (Fitz), Jurgen Prochnow (Major Schlegel), Nicholas Reinke (Father Moericke), Franz Rogowski (Waldland), Sophie Rois (Aunt Walburga), Andro Sarishvilli (Andro), Matthias Schoenaerts (Captain Herder), Christian Sengeweld (Fr. Kreutzberg), Amber Shave (Rosi Jagerstatter (young)), Ermin Sijamija (Ermin), Maria Simon (Resie Schwaninger), Maria Stadler (Maria), Barbara Stampfl (Maridi Jagerstatter (young)), Benno Steinegger (Corporal Grimm), Michael Steinocher (Officer Kersting), Mark Wasschke (Spitz, the blacksmith), Maria Weger (Maridl Jagerstatter), Martin Wuttke (Major Kiel)

Running Time: 174 mins

Classification: PG (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

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Trailer:

Nashville based soul rock band KB & THE IDYLLWILDE has released the official music video for their new single, “Drown.” Directed by front-woman Katie Burke and shot by Dustin Brandt Hyer, “Drown” is the second single off of the band’s upcoming album, I Just Wanna Love You, I Just Wanna Let You, due to release February 14, 2020.

“I think the line, ‘ I’ll be the wounded bird and you can be the lion…depends on who wants to be the boss.’ is my favorite line in the song, it really sums up a big theme of the album, too– that anyone can get what they want in big-bad-hard love, some of us want power, and some of us want to give it away. ‘”
— Katie Burke

“Basically, this album encompasses all the ways we distort and experience love, or how I have at least…

Its a lot of addiction, egoic superiority/inferiority tendencies, and just plain codependent shit. Its a ‘love’ album about not knowing how to get it right, but celebrating all the ugly/beautiful ways we get it wrong.” – Katie Burke

 

The Word Alive — Telle Smith (vocals), Tony Pizzuti (guitar, vocals) Zack Hansen (guitar, vocals), and Matt Horn (drums) — have shared the video for the new song “NO WAY OUT“.

“‘NO WAY OUT’ doesn’t hold back, as it instantly pulls you into the darkest day of my life,” says Smith. “It’s a story I needed to tell for myself just as much as someone else may need to hear it. The worst thing a person can do is lose themselves completely, and that’s exactly what happened to me.”

The song lives on the new album MONOMANIA, which was produced by Erik Ron (GodsmackI PrevailIssues) and arrives February 21 on Fearless Records/Caroline Australia. The record can be pre-ordered here.

The Arizona-based band previously teamed up with The Noise to premiere the anthemic track “BURNING YOUR WORLD DOWN.” Listen here and here.

“When you listen to our new music, I hope you have a better understanding of our entire career,” Smith says, encompassing the album as a whole. “Maybe you can see the whole story and realize that we’re not different from you. We’ve been through it all, but we’re always trying to learn, grow, and leave something behind we feel will help people. This is our purest work. This is everything we’ve been through in the last couple of years. It’s the best conclusion of the last 10 years and the best opening to the next 10.”


The Word Alive’s first decade was comprised of five full-length records and a debut EP that pushed their discography to 250,000+ sales worldwide and over 100 million streams, highlighted by tracks “Why Am I Like This?” [11.5 million Spotify streams], “Trapped” [14 million Spotify streams], and “Misery” [14.5 million Spotify streams]. With a new decade under way, thousands of shows played around the world, and their sights set on a future cast in fire thanks to the new, Erik Ron-produced singles “BURNING YOUR WORLD DOWN, “MONOMANIA, and “NO WAY OUT,” The Word Alive appear ready to face their bright future head on. MONOMANIA arrives on February 21.