Category: Film

teamed up with Defiant Screen Entertainment to give you a chance to win a copy of this must-see film on DVD. Directed by award-winning director Wim Wenders (The American Friend, Wings Of Desire) and starring James McAvoy (Split, Filth) and Alicia Vikander (Ex Machina, Tomb Raider) in their most powerful roles yet Submergance is one of the msot under-rated films of 2018.

The film is released on home entertainment through Defiant Screen Entertainment on November 21st but we are given five lucky people a chance to win the film on DVD by simply private messaging our  Facebook page and telling us which character James McAvoy portrays in the Marvel universe.

 

Bruce Willis is back and Subculture has teamed up with Defiant Screen Entertainment to give you a chance to win his latest offering on DVD. Directed by Brian A Miller (Officer Down, The Prince) and starring Bruce Willis (Die Hard, Pulp Fiction) alongside Frank Grillo (The Grey, Captain America: Winter SoldierReprisal is one action ride that you don’t want to miss.

The film is released on home entertainment through Defiant Screen Entertainment on November 21st but we are given five lucky people a chance to win the film on DVD by simply private messaging our  Facebook page and telling us what your favourite Bruce Willis film is and why.

 

 

The nominees for the 2018 AACTA Awards have just been announced. And the nominees are:

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FILM

Boy Erased

Breath

Cargo

Ladies In Black

Sweet Country

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST INDIE FILM

Brother’s Nest

Jirga

The Second

Strange Colours

West Of Sunshine

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION

Joel Edgerton – Boy Erased

Simon Baker – Breath

Bruce Beresford – Ladies In Black

Warwick Thornton – Sweet Country

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ACTOR

Ryan Corr – 1%

Lucas Gedges – Boy Erased

Damian Hill – West Of Sunshine

Daniel Monks – Pulse

Hamilton Morris – Sweet Country

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ACTRESS

Abbey Lee – 1%

Rooney Mara – Mary Magdalene

Kate Mulvany – The Merger

Julia Ormond – Ladies In Black

Angourie Rice – Ladies In Black

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Simon Baker – Breath

Fayssai Bassai – The Merger

Russell Crowe – Boy Erased

Joel Edgerton – Boy Erased

Josh McConville – 1%

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Elizabeth Debicki – Breath

Natassia Gorey-Furber – Sweet Country

Noni Hazlehurst – Ladies In Black

Simone Kessell – 1%

Nicole Kidman – Boy Erased

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Matt Nable – 1%

James Browne – Brother’s Nest

David Tranter, Steven McGregor – Sweet Country

Leigh Whannell – Upgrade

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Joel Edgerton – Boy Erased

Gerard Lee, Tim Winton, Simon Baker – Breath

Yolanda Ramke – Cargo

Sue Millinken Bruce Beresford – Ladies In Black

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Marden Dean, Rick Rifici – Breath

Peter James – Ladies In Black

Warwick Thornton – Sweet Country

Thom Neal – West Of Sunshine

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING

Dany Cooper – Breath

Mark Warner – Ladies In Black

Nick Meyers – Sweet Country

Andy Canny – Upgrade

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND

Robert Mackenzie – Breath

Liam Egan – Cargo

David Tranter, Thom Kellar, Sam Gain-Emery, Will Sheridan – Sweet Country

P.K. Hooker, Will Files, Andrew Ramage – Upgrade

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

Christopher Gordon – Ladies In Black

Hildur Guonadottir, Johann Johannsson – Mary Magdalene

Dominic Lewis – Peter Rabbit

Jed Palmer – Upgrade

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

Jo Ford – Cargo

Roger Ford, Lisa Thompson – Peter Rabbit

Felicity Abbott, Kate Sharrock – Upgrade

Matthew Putland, Vanessa Cerne – Winchester

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN

Wendy Cork – Ladies In Black

Jacqueline Durran – Mary Magdalene

Heather Wallace – Sweet Country

Wendy Cork – Winchester

The countdown to the release of Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse is now on and once again Sony have teased us with this sizzle reel that shows what the cast have been up to around the world. Featuring the voices of Nicolas Cage (Face/Off, Gone In 60 Seconds), Hailee Steinfeld (True Grit, Ender’s Game), Liev Schreiber (X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Spotlight) and Jake Johnson (Jurassic World, The Mummy) this is the film that has the whole comic book universe talking at the moment.

 

There is little wonder that horror fans are so excited about the forthcoming release of Halloween. The film is being labelled in its advertising as the true sequel to the 1978 original and it sees the modern day King Of Horror Jason Blum, the man behind Blumhouse Productions, teaming up the legendary John Carpenter and Jamie Lee Curtis to bring it to the big screen. Of course that means that everybody’s favourite psycho Michael Myers is also back in cinemas just in time to give us a fright for Halloween. Intrigued about what audiences can expect Subculture sent Dave Griffiths to catch up with the man himself – Jason Blum.

“I discovered Halloween a little later on, I discovered it in college,” admits Blum as we chat. “But we have a very specific approach to movie making at Blumhouse, as a company, and I was very intrigued to try and introduce that process to such a well-known franchise with so many sequels. I wanted to try and you know apply our technique and try and make a great one. The first Halloween is such an iconic movie and none of the sequels have ever really lived up to it and I’m not sure if ours is good as the first but it is better than the other nine so I am very proud of it.”

When this new Halloween was first talked about online as a sequel fans started to ask the question of whether they are supposed to ignore all previous sequels so what does Blum as a producer say about that. “Yeah, this movie is basically the characters from the first Halloween movie forty years later, because that is how many years ago it is since the first film. I think our film tips its hat to the other nine movies, yeah there are references to the other nine, but in the terms of story-telling and mythology it is absolutely John Carpenter’s and then us and we ignore the other nine films.”

 

You can hear our full interview with Jason Blum with the Spreaker player on this page. Halloween hits cinemas on the 25th October.

 

Lido on the Roof returns for its fourth year this year lighting up the rooftop of the beloved Glenferrie Road cinema. Its spring and summer film program showcases the most hotly anticipated new release films, as well as a film lovers’ selection of retro classics.

With its well-stocked rooftop bar and extended trading hours, the Lido Rooftop is an irresistible choice as a meeting spot for friends to enjoy a drink and watch the sunset colour the surrounding Hawthorn skyline, before catching a film on the big screen – either on the Roof, or in one of the indoor cinemas. The bar is open to anyone who has purchased a movie ticket.

The program launches with the electrifying Bohemian Rhapsody, chronicling the years in the lead up to legendary rock band Queen’s appearance at the 1985 Live Aid concert. Rami Malek (Mr Robot) has transformed himself into a jaw-droppingly accurate portrayal of Freddie Mercury for the film, helmed by director Bryan Singer (X-Men series). Catch Rooftop screenings until Tuesday 6 November.

Blockbuster movie-lovers and arthouse cinephiles alike will be spoilt for choice during the holiday season. The next title in the Harry Potter universe, Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald starts its Rooftop season on 15 November; Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and Ralph Breaks the Internet will be alternating nights during the week commencing Thursday 13 December; and Mary Poppins Returns floats down to the Rooftop on New Year’s Day.

Advance screenings for the darkly disturbing Suspiria directed by Luca Guadagnino (Call Me By Your Name, A Bigger Splash) take place on Friday 2 and Sunday 4 November. A fresh interpretation of Dario Argento’s 1977 horror masterpiece, Suspiria stars Dakota Johnson, Tilda Swinton, and Chloë Grace Moretz, with music composed by Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke.

Joel Edgerton’s next turn behind the lens comes with a powerful story about a boy sent to gay conversion camp, called Boy Erased, screening on the Rooftop from 9 November; Step Brothers dynamic duo Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly team up again in Holmes & Watson, from Friday 28 December; and horror fans will delight in the arrival of director Jennifer Kent’s (The Babadook) new film, The Nightingale, which was shot in Tasmania and recently won the Special Jury Prize at the Venice Film Festival. It screens on the Rooftop from Thursday 24 January.

Alongside all the exciting new releases, there’s a whole pick ‘n’ mix of retro gems in the Lido Rooftop program for movie fans, young and old. Costumes are crucial for the House of Capulet party screening of Baz Luhrmann’s iconic sun-drenched, star-crossed love story Romeo + Juliet on Wednesday 7 November, the high school reunion screening of Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion on Wednesday 28 November and relive your childhood with a special screening of Matilda played on ex-rental VHS on Wednesday 16 January.

It’s not just Charli XCX and Troye Sivan who are feeling nostalgic for 1999. Lido on the Roof will be taking things back to a stellar year for teen-rom-coms with its Teen Dream series, featuring She’s All That (Wed 6 Feb), Drive Me Crazy (Wed 20 Mar), and Never Been Kissed (Wed 3 Apr).

Action movie fans will bust a bicep over the SchwarzeMega Marathon on Wednesday 5 December; kids will squeal over classics like The Nightmare Before Christmas (Wed 12 Dec), Matilda (Wed 16 Jan), and The Lion King (Wed 23 Jan); and 80s film fans will flip out over Die Hard (Wed 19 Dec), Labyrinth (Wed 9 Jan), Purple Rain (Wed 30 Jan), Big(Wed 20 Feb), Beverly Hills Cop (Wed 6 Mar), and Risky Business (Wed 13 Mar).

An extra thrilling addition to the program for genre film fans is the inaugural Paracinema Fest, happening over four days from Thursday 29 November to Sunday 2 December. The full program is yet to be revealed, however some appetite whetting early announcements include Terminal starring Margot Robbie and Simon Pegg; the Christmas zombie apocalypse flick Anna and the Apocalypse; and the next bizarrely hilarious film from the creators of The Greasy Strangler (2016), An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn starring Aubrey Plaza, Jemaine Clement, Craig Robinson, and Emile Hirsch.

It’s going to be another glorious summer of cinema under the stars at Lido on the Roof.

Full program details are as follows:

Lido on the Roof Events:

Fri 2 NovSuspiria advance screening
Sun 4 NovSuspiria advance screening
Wed 7 NovRomeo + Juliet – House of Capulet costume party
Wed 28 NovRomy and Michele’s High School Reunion – High school reunion costume party
Wed 5 Dec: Schwarzemega Marathon – Kindergarten CopJunior, and Twins
Wed 19 DecDie Hard – Singlets and slacks costume party
Wed 16 JanMatilda – Played on ex-rental VHS with chocolate cake served
Wed 6 Feb: Teen Dream: She’s All That – Movie make-over montage dress-up
Wed 13 Feb: The Before Trilogy – Before SunriseBefore Sunset, and Before Midnight –Speed Dating on the Rooftop
Wed 13 MarRisky Business – Shirts, socks, and sunglasses party
Wed 3 Apr: Teen Dream: Never Been Kissed – High school prom costume party

Special Programming:
Retro

Wed 12 DecThe Nightmare Before Christmas
Wed 9 JanLabyrinth
Wed 23 JanThe Lion King
Wed 30 JanPurple Rain
Wed 20 FebBig
Wed 27 FebThe Bodyguard
Wed 6 MarBeverly Hills Cop
Wed 20 MarDrive Me Crazy
Wed 27 MarFrom Dusk till Dawn

Full Program
November 2018

1, 3, 5, 6 Nov: Bohemian Rhapsody
2, 4 Nov: Suspiria – advance screenings
7 Nov: Romeo + Juliet (1996) – retro
8, 10, 12 NovThe Girl in the Spider’s Web
9, 11, 13 NovBoy Erased
15-18, 20 NovFantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald
19 NovThe Old Man & the Gun
22 Nov: Strange Colours
21, 23-25, 27 NovThe Nutcracker and the Four Realms – 21st = advance screening
26 NovI Used to Be Normal: A Boyband Fangirl Story
28 Nov: Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion (1997) – retro
29 Nov: Paracinema Fest – An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn
30 Nov: Paracinema Fest – Overlord

December 2018
1 Dec: Paracinema Fest – Anna and the Apocalypse
2 Dec: Paracinema Fest – Terminal
4 DecWidows
5 Dec: Schwarzemega Marathon – Kindergarten Cops, Junior, Twins – retro
6 DecMortal Engines
7 DecThe Grinch
9, 11 DecOverlord
10 DecStudio 54: The Documentary
12 Dec: The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) – retro
13, 15, 17 DecSpider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
14, 26 Dec: Ralph Breaks the Internet – 14th = advance screening
19 Dec: Die Hard (1988) – retro
20, 23, 24 DecBumblebee
21 DecMary Poppins Returns – advance screening
22 DecAt Eternity’s Gate
25 DecAquaman
27 DecThe Favourite
28, 30, 31 Dec: Holmes & Watson
29 Dec: Vice

January 2018
1-3, 8 JanMary Poppins Returns
4, 7 JanHow to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World
5 Jan: Holmes & Watson
6 JanRalph Breaks the Internet
9 Jan: Labyrinth (1986) – retro
10, 12, 15 JanAd Astra
11, 14 JanWelcome to Marwen
13 JanThe Hate U Give
16 Jan: Matilda (1996) – retro
17, 21 JanStorm Boy
18, 20, 22 JanGlass
19 Jan: Mary, Queen of Scots
23 Jan: The Lion King (1994) – retro
24, 26, 28 JanThe Nightingale
25, 29 JanThe Front Runner
27 JanGreen Book
30 Jan: Purple Rain (1984) – retro

Lido on the Roof (November – April) 

7 days a week, all rooftop showings start at 9pm, unless otherwise indicated.
The Lido on the Roof bar is open:
Mon – Fri: 4pm onwards
Sat and Sun: 2pm onwards
Public Holidays: 12pm onwards

675 Glenferrie Road, Hawthorn, 3122

https://www.lidocinemas.com.au/rooftop

Summary:

A look at the life of the astronaut, Neil Armstrong, and the legendary space mission that led him to become the first man to walk on the Moon on July 20, 1969.

Year: 2018

Australian Cinema Release Date: 11th October 2018

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Damien Chazelle

Screenwriter: Josh Singer, James R. Hansen (based on the book by)

Cast: Christopher Abbott (Dave Scott), Mark Armstrong (Paul Haney), Chandler Barron (Scott Carpenter), Skyler Bible (Richard Gordon), Connor Colton Blodgett (Mark Armstrong), Leon Bridges (Gil Scott-Heron), Callie Brown (Young Bonnie White), Kyle Chandler (Deke Slayton), Jason Clarke (Ed White), Steve Coulter (Guenter Wendt), Ethan Embry (Pete Conrad), J.D. Evermore (Chris Kraft), Ryan Clay Forbes (Bill Anders), Claire Foy (Janet Armstrong), Patrick Fugit (Eliott See), Matthew Glave (Chuck Yaeger), Ryan Gosling (Neil Armstong), Edmund Grant (Older Ed White Jnr.), Choppy Guillotte (John Young), Lukas Haas (Mike Collins), Oliver Hamilton (Pat White), James R. Hansen (Dr. Kurt Debus), Robert Hatch (Joe Schmitt), Braydyn Nash Helms (Young Eddie White Jnr.), Ciaran Hinds (Bob Gilruth), Helen S. Jackson (Louise Sheron), Brian d’Arcy James (Joe Walker), Shaun Eric Jones (Wally Schirra), Jonathon Kankolenski (Young Edward Higgins II), John F. Kennedy (himself – archive), Michael Lee Kimel (Bill Moon), William Gregory Lee (Gordon Cooper), Dutin Lewis (Ralph Morse), George Linkenback (Col. Frank Borman), Ben Owen (John Hodge), Greg Puckett (Charles Berry), Willie Repoley (Jim Fucci), Kermit Rolison (George Mueller), Pablo Schreiber (Jim Lovell), Margo Schroeder (June Hoffman Armstrong), Brady Smith (Butch Butchart), Claire Smith (Older Bonnie White), Corey Michael Smith (Roger Chaffee), Lucy Brooke Stafford (Karen Armstrong), Andrew Stahl (Ken Mattingly), Jim Stearns (David Hammock), Corey Stoll (Buzz Aldrin), Kris Swanberg (Marilyn See), William G. Tomek (Donald Babbitt), Kurt Vonnegut Jr. (himself – archive), Kent Wagner (Fred Haise), Gavin Warren (Young Rick Armstrong), John David Whalen (John Glenn), Shea Whigham (Gus Grissom), Luke Winters (Older Rick Armstrong), Perry Zulu Jnr. (Robert Lawrence)

Runtime: 141 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR FIRST MAN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

 

When you think of space exploration we now days think of the romanticised Hollywood version of space travel. Unless you can think back to realistic movies like Apollo 13 it is easy to forget that it only takes a second for space exploration to become a nightmare for all involved. Sure we have sci-fi movies like Aliens that enhance the extra-terrestrial horror that many believe might be out there, somewhere, but very few films capture the horrors of the unknown and the impact it had on its first explorers like First Man does.

Director Damian Chazelle (Whiplash, La La Land) doesn’t have to develop scary looking aliens in order to create horror for intrepid test pilot and engineer Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling – Drive, Blue Valentine) and his wife Janet (Claire Foy – Season Of The Witch, Vampire Academy). Like he did with Whiplash Chazelle just shows human life in its purest form… which for this family provided more horror than most couples could withstand. From the loss of their daughter which led to Armstrong joining the NASA Space Program in the first place, dangerous test missions that place Neil’s life in danger nearly every day through to the anguish that Janet endures on the days she knows that her husband is doing such tests. Chazelle just stirs the pot and lets the human emotions in the film bubble and boil until they explode.

Neil and Janet’s solace come from their best friends Ed White (Jason Clarke – Zero Dark Thirty, Terminator Genisys), his wife Pat (Olivia Hamilton – Don’t Worry He Won’t Get Far On Foot, The Last Tycoon) and Neil’s immediate boss the caring yet determined Deke Slayton (Kyle Chandler – Friday Night Lights, Argo). Even so Pat and Janet’s ‘talking’ is normally disguised as children’s play dates, Neil seems happy to talk to Ed about the mission but pushes him away when the talk turns personal and while Deke does what he can to help his test pilots at the same time he is the man who has to make tough calls like switching off intercoms so wives can’t hear their husbands in peril and writing death announcements for missions he has to appear to be ‘confident’ for.

First Man could have easily suffered from Titanic-syndrome, a film where the audience knows the ultimate outcome and therefore just sits on the edge of their seat waiting for the expected finale but here Chazelle, who is aided brilliantly by his screenwriter Josh Singer (The West Wing, The Post), takes the audience on a different kind of journey. He captures moments they never told us about during our High School science classes. The raw, claustrophobic feel a test pilot feels as he hurled into orbit in what seems like a sardine can that they aren’t even sure will make the journey, the moments that wives find out that their husbands haven’t returned from a flight and the protests that occurred in America when the loss of life made people realise that these test pilots were really guinea pigs in what seemed like a cruel experiment. Then of course there is the tension an astronaut’s job puts on his family life and here we see painful moments such as the one where Janet has to plead with Neil to tell his children that he may not come back from his moon mission.

Just like he did with Whiplash Chazelle also brings out the best in his cast and helps them bring their character’s pain and anguish to the fore. Claire Foy delivers her best role to date and if she doesn’t at least receive an Oscar nomination for this performance then something is seriously wrong. As an actress she delivers on every level as Janet is put through an emotional ringer and these are the kinds of performances that the Academy should be applauding – ones that test an actress and her acting abilities. Equally good is Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong. When cast as an All-American hero, a real life Captain America if you will, you wouldn’t expect an actor to have to become emotional dark and foreboding, but that is exactly what is expected of Gosling here. Forget his pretty boy looks because here Gosling calls on the acting skills that saw him create memorable characters in films like Drive or The Place Beyond The Pines… he is absolutely brilliant.

First Man is the first film of 2018 that I have seen where my thought throughout was ‘this needs to be an Oscar film.’ From start to finish it felt like the film was taking me on a claustrophobic ride with its characters. The sequences in which the pilots are conducting test flights are moments of sheer cinematic masterpiece, where visuals and sound effects come together in a way that creates a horror that you never expected. This combined by outstanding dramatic acting performances from its leads and again I find myself putting the five stars down on a Damian Chazelle film. First Man is sheer brilliance, a lesson in dramatic filmmaking.

 

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): 

 

 

IMDB Rating: First Man (2018) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment First Man Reviews: N/A

Trailer: