Category: Film Genre

 

There is little wonder that horror fans are so excited about the forthcoming release of Halloween. The film is being labelled in its advertising as the true sequel to the 1978 original and it sees the modern day King Of Horror Jason Blum, the man behind Blumhouse Productions, teaming up the legendary John Carpenter and Jamie Lee Curtis to bring it to the big screen. Of course that means that everybody’s favourite psycho Michael Myers is also back in cinemas just in time to give us a fright for Halloween. Intrigued about what audiences can expect Subculture sent Dave Griffiths to catch up with the man himself – Jason Blum.

“I discovered Halloween a little later on, I discovered it in college,” admits Blum as we chat. “But we have a very specific approach to movie making at Blumhouse, as a company, and I was very intrigued to try and introduce that process to such a well-known franchise with so many sequels. I wanted to try and you know apply our technique and try and make a great one. The first Halloween is such an iconic movie and none of the sequels have ever really lived up to it and I’m not sure if ours is good as the first but it is better than the other nine so I am very proud of it.”

When this new Halloween was first talked about online as a sequel fans started to ask the question of whether they are supposed to ignore all previous sequels so what does Blum as a producer say about that. “Yeah, this movie is basically the characters from the first Halloween movie forty years later, because that is how many years ago it is since the first film. I think our film tips its hat to the other nine movies, yeah there are references to the other nine, but in the terms of story-telling and mythology it is absolutely John Carpenter’s and then us and we ignore the other nine films.”

 

You can hear our full interview with Jason Blum with the Spreaker player on this page. Halloween hits cinemas on the 25th October.

Summary:

A look at the life of the astronaut, Neil Armstrong, and the legendary space mission that led him to become the first man to walk on the Moon on July 20, 1969.

Year: 2018

Australian Cinema Release Date: 11th October 2018

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Damien Chazelle

Screenwriter: Josh Singer, James R. Hansen (based on the book by)

Cast: Christopher Abbott (Dave Scott), Mark Armstrong (Paul Haney), Chandler Barron (Scott Carpenter), Skyler Bible (Richard Gordon), Connor Colton Blodgett (Mark Armstrong), Leon Bridges (Gil Scott-Heron), Callie Brown (Young Bonnie White), Kyle Chandler (Deke Slayton), Jason Clarke (Ed White), Steve Coulter (Guenter Wendt), Ethan Embry (Pete Conrad), J.D. Evermore (Chris Kraft), Ryan Clay Forbes (Bill Anders), Claire Foy (Janet Armstrong), Patrick Fugit (Eliott See), Matthew Glave (Chuck Yaeger), Ryan Gosling (Neil Armstong), Edmund Grant (Older Ed White Jnr.), Choppy Guillotte (John Young), Lukas Haas (Mike Collins), Oliver Hamilton (Pat White), James R. Hansen (Dr. Kurt Debus), Robert Hatch (Joe Schmitt), Braydyn Nash Helms (Young Eddie White Jnr.), Ciaran Hinds (Bob Gilruth), Helen S. Jackson (Louise Sheron), Brian d’Arcy James (Joe Walker), Shaun Eric Jones (Wally Schirra), Jonathon Kankolenski (Young Edward Higgins II), John F. Kennedy (himself – archive), Michael Lee Kimel (Bill Moon), William Gregory Lee (Gordon Cooper), Dutin Lewis (Ralph Morse), George Linkenback (Col. Frank Borman), Ben Owen (John Hodge), Greg Puckett (Charles Berry), Willie Repoley (Jim Fucci), Kermit Rolison (George Mueller), Pablo Schreiber (Jim Lovell), Margo Schroeder (June Hoffman Armstrong), Brady Smith (Butch Butchart), Claire Smith (Older Bonnie White), Corey Michael Smith (Roger Chaffee), Lucy Brooke Stafford (Karen Armstrong), Andrew Stahl (Ken Mattingly), Jim Stearns (David Hammock), Corey Stoll (Buzz Aldrin), Kris Swanberg (Marilyn See), William G. Tomek (Donald Babbitt), Kurt Vonnegut Jr. (himself – archive), Kent Wagner (Fred Haise), Gavin Warren (Young Rick Armstrong), John David Whalen (John Glenn), Shea Whigham (Gus Grissom), Luke Winters (Older Rick Armstrong), Perry Zulu Jnr. (Robert Lawrence)

Runtime: 141 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR FIRST MAN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

 

When you think of space exploration we now days think of the romanticised Hollywood version of space travel. Unless you can think back to realistic movies like Apollo 13 it is easy to forget that it only takes a second for space exploration to become a nightmare for all involved. Sure we have sci-fi movies like Aliens that enhance the extra-terrestrial horror that many believe might be out there, somewhere, but very few films capture the horrors of the unknown and the impact it had on its first explorers like First Man does.

Director Damian Chazelle (Whiplash, La La Land) doesn’t have to develop scary looking aliens in order to create horror for intrepid test pilot and engineer Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling – Drive, Blue Valentine) and his wife Janet (Claire Foy – Season Of The Witch, Vampire Academy). Like he did with Whiplash Chazelle just shows human life in its purest form… which for this family provided more horror than most couples could withstand. From the loss of their daughter which led to Armstrong joining the NASA Space Program in the first place, dangerous test missions that place Neil’s life in danger nearly every day through to the anguish that Janet endures on the days she knows that her husband is doing such tests. Chazelle just stirs the pot and lets the human emotions in the film bubble and boil until they explode.

Neil and Janet’s solace come from their best friends Ed White (Jason Clarke – Zero Dark Thirty, Terminator Genisys), his wife Pat (Olivia Hamilton – Don’t Worry He Won’t Get Far On Foot, The Last Tycoon) and Neil’s immediate boss the caring yet determined Deke Slayton (Kyle Chandler – Friday Night Lights, Argo). Even so Pat and Janet’s ‘talking’ is normally disguised as children’s play dates, Neil seems happy to talk to Ed about the mission but pushes him away when the talk turns personal and while Deke does what he can to help his test pilots at the same time he is the man who has to make tough calls like switching off intercoms so wives can’t hear their husbands in peril and writing death announcements for missions he has to appear to be ‘confident’ for.

First Man could have easily suffered from Titanic-syndrome, a film where the audience knows the ultimate outcome and therefore just sits on the edge of their seat waiting for the expected finale but here Chazelle, who is aided brilliantly by his screenwriter Josh Singer (The West Wing, The Post), takes the audience on a different kind of journey. He captures moments they never told us about during our High School science classes. The raw, claustrophobic feel a test pilot feels as he hurled into orbit in what seems like a sardine can that they aren’t even sure will make the journey, the moments that wives find out that their husbands haven’t returned from a flight and the protests that occurred in America when the loss of life made people realise that these test pilots were really guinea pigs in what seemed like a cruel experiment. Then of course there is the tension an astronaut’s job puts on his family life and here we see painful moments such as the one where Janet has to plead with Neil to tell his children that he may not come back from his moon mission.

Just like he did with Whiplash Chazelle also brings out the best in his cast and helps them bring their character’s pain and anguish to the fore. Claire Foy delivers her best role to date and if she doesn’t at least receive an Oscar nomination for this performance then something is seriously wrong. As an actress she delivers on every level as Janet is put through an emotional ringer and these are the kinds of performances that the Academy should be applauding – ones that test an actress and her acting abilities. Equally good is Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong. When cast as an All-American hero, a real life Captain America if you will, you wouldn’t expect an actor to have to become emotional dark and foreboding, but that is exactly what is expected of Gosling here. Forget his pretty boy looks because here Gosling calls on the acting skills that saw him create memorable characters in films like Drive or The Place Beyond The Pines… he is absolutely brilliant.

First Man is the first film of 2018 that I have seen where my thought throughout was ‘this needs to be an Oscar film.’ From start to finish it felt like the film was taking me on a claustrophobic ride with its characters. The sequences in which the pilots are conducting test flights are moments of sheer cinematic masterpiece, where visuals and sound effects come together in a way that creates a horror that you never expected. This combined by outstanding dramatic acting performances from its leads and again I find myself putting the five stars down on a Damian Chazelle film. First Man is sheer brilliance, a lesson in dramatic filmmaking.

 

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): 

 

 

IMDB Rating: First Man (2018) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment First Man Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

 

Move over Iron-Man, Captain America and all the other good guys in the Marvel universe, because now it is time for Venom, one of those anti-heroes that fans of the comics seem to just lap up. This has to be one of the most eagerly anticipated comic-book films of the year and anyone who saw the reaction at Brazil’s Comic-Con earlier this year knows that there is a ready made audience for the audience which stars Tom Hardy as hard-hitting journalist Eddie Brock and Venom, Michelle Williams as his love interest Anne Weying and Riz Ahmed as arch nemesis Carlton Drake. Now Hardy, Ahmed and Williams sit down and have a chat about the film that every comic book fan wants to see.

“It is a mixture of stuff that is going to make you laugh and a mixture of stuff that is going to make you jump out of your seat,” says Ahmed trying to sum up the film quickly. “There is stuff that is quite deep, some stuff that is scary, there is action, there is a love story in there and even some really cool science-fiction stuff. There is space travel, aliens… so there is a lot going on there. People say there is something for everyone and normally when they say that they mean you know it is kind of watered down and everybody can get on board but this will bang everybody in the face with about a million kind of flavours… it is really full on.”

During the interview we also learn that it is quite ironic that Hardy and Ahmed find themselves battling it out in Venom because they have known each other for quite a few years. “We’ve known each since we were younger… about eleven years ago I think,” says Hardy looking across to Ahmed. “I’m a bit older than him, but less cool. We both kind of started out at the same time and I knew him back in the time when we were starting out. And where we come from it is a very small kind of social place so it is kind of weird for us both to be sitting here.”

The talk soon turns to the fact that they are battling each other and Ahmed laughs. “I don’t see my character as evil,” he says with a laugh “I don’t see my character as being either cool or evil to be honest. I think he is quite geeky and quite a good guy. But he is still quite terrifying so don’t get too attached. He is also a liar and very Machiavellian in a lot of ways.”

“Don’t worry I am a wretched coward,” says Hardy interrupting which results in them both bursting out into laughter. “I brought all of that to the table. And we celebrated that because that is what Venom is all about, it is the celebration of flawed human beings who have aliens attached to them, and they have to negotiate life with these aliens that have come to Earth to eat people.”

“I think a lot of people can relate to that,” Ahmed says and the two again erupt in laughter.

The person who brings some sense back to the interview is four time Oscar nominated actress Michelle Williams. “She is a professional woman and she works at a law form,” she says when talking about her character. “She is ambitious, she is intelligent, she is very sharp and she is also not willing to settle. And she makes a decision during the film that even if it breaks her heart she has to ask for more out of her partner. When we first started making this movie it was kind of the precipice of the me too movement and there was lot going on, there was a lot swirling in the air and I didn’t want to play somebody that was passive and I didn’t want to play somebody that was recessively feminine, so I envisioned her as somebody who literally wore the pants in the relationship. ”

“It was Tom Hardy he was the big time drop for me,” she says what made her want to do a comic-book movie. “That guy is one of the greats and I thought I am going to learn from him and I am going to enjoy watching him, I will enjoy being in scenes with him and I know that he will make me a better sparring partner because he works on such an unbelievably high level. He is just such a visile performer and it is like watching an animal. He is not thinking about or telegraphing his next move and so it is really exciting as a viewer because you are just waiting to see what happens and he never lets you get ahead of him. ”

The themes of the movie also seemed to appeal to Williams. “It is about a man who is dealing with a duality. A man who is dealing with a shadow side and learning both how to wrangle that and also learning more about that through the process. And then there is Venom who is a real shocker, but also more shocking is that there is a side to Venom that is so lovable and dear and we all come to know that as well.”

 

Venom is in cinemas now.

Stan will exclusively premiere DEUTSCHLAND86, the sequel to the international award-winning historic spy thriller DEUTSCHLAND83, on October 20, with new episodes premiering weekly. 

Created by Anna Winger and Jörg Winger, Deutschland86 picks up with Martin Rauch (Jonas Nay), his Aunt Lenora (Maria Schrader) and their colleagues at the East German foreign intelligence agency (HVA) three years after DEUTSCHLAND83. Abandoned by Moscow and desperate for cash, the East German leadership pushes their secret operatives to experiment with global capitalism and save their sinking socialist ship. Long banished to Africa for his sins in 1983, Martin Rauch is now sent back into the field. Dark deals and a dangerous mission lead him to South Africa, Angola, Libya, Paris, West Berlin and finally back to East Berlin, where he must make an impossible decision.

Our hero’s journey plays out to a soundtrack of international pop music – against a backdrop of Perestroika, proxy Cold Wars, the struggle to end Apartheid, a year of terror in Western Europe, and the creeping feeling back home in East Germany, that the end just might be near.

1986: East Germany is broke, Perestroika is real, terrorism plagues Europe, the AIDS crisis intensifies and the struggle against apartheid rages on. Banished for his sins in 1983, Martin Rauch wallows in limbo until his Aunt Lenora conscripts him into her plan to drum up hard currency abroad. They set off on an adventure through Africa, Western Europe and finally home to East Germany. Can mafioso-style Capitalism save Communism just in the nick of time?

Directed by Florian Cossen (Das Lied In MirNSU / Die Ermittler – Nur Für Den Dienstgebrauch) and Arne Feldhusen (StrombergDer Tatortreiniger), DEUTSCHLAND86 will see the return of cast members Jonas NayMaria SchraderSylvester GrothVladimir BurlakovLudwig TrepteAlexander BeyerCarina Wiese and Sonja Gerhardt. They will be joined this season by Anke Engelke (Ladykracher), Fritzi Haberlandt (Erbsen Auf Halb 6), Lavinia Wilson (Schoßgebete) and Florence Kasumba (Black Panther, Emerald City).

Executive Producers are Anna Winger, Jörg Winger, Sebastian Werninger and Ulrike Leibfried. Directors of Cinematography are Matthias Fleischer (Heidi) and Kristian Leschner (4 Könige).

DEUTSCHLAND86 is an UFA FICTION production in cooperation with Amazon Germany and Fremantle, supported by the German Motion Picture Fund, Medienboard Berlin-Brandenburg, Creative Europe Media – MEDIA Programme of the European Union and the Department of trade and industry South Africa.

The first season of the series – DEUTSCHLAND83 – won numerous accolades, including an International Emmy, Peabody Award, Adolf Grimme Award and Golden Camera award in Germany. Jonas Nay won the 2016 Golden Nymph for Best Actor at the Festival de Television in Monte Carlo, as well as the German Television Award for his portrayal of Martin Rauch.

 

DEUTSCHLAND86 will premiere on OCTOBER 20, exclusively on Stan

DEUTSCHLAND83 is currently streaming on Stan

 

Check out the brand new teaser trailer for Disney’s “Aladdin,” the thrilling and vibrant live-action adaptation of Disney’s animated classic. Be sure to take a look and don’t forget to see “Aladdin” when it hits cinemas on May 23, 2019.

      

“Aladdin” is the exciting tale of the charming street rat Aladdin, the courageous and self-determined Princess Jasmine and the Genie who may be the key to their future. Directed by Guy Ritchie, who brings his singular flair for fast-paced, visceral action to the fictitious port city of Agrabah, the film is written by John August and Guy Ritchie based on Disney’s “Aladdin.”

 

“Aladdin” stars Will Smith as the larger-than-life Genie; Mena Massoud as the charming scoundrel Aladdin; Naomi Scott as Jasmine, the beautiful, self-determined princess; Marwan Kenzari as Jafar, the powerful sorcerer; Navid Negahban as the Sultan concerned with his daughter’s future; Nasim Pedrad as Dalia, Princess Jasmine’s free-spirited best friend and confidante; Billy Magnussen as the handsome and arrogant suitor Prince Anders; and Numan Acar as Hakim, Jafar’s right-hand man and captain of the palace guards. The film is produced by Dan Lin and Jonathan Eirich with Marc Platt and Kevin De La Noy serving as executive producers. Alan Menken provides the score, which includes new recordings of the original songs written by Menken and lyricists Howard Ashman and Tim Rice and two new songs written by Menken and songwriters Benj Pasek and Justin Paul.The film, which was shot on practical stages in London and on location amidst the stunning desert vistas of Jordan, has a talented creative team helping to bring Agrabah to life, including: director of photography Alan Stewart, production designer Gemma Jackson and costume designer Michael Wilkinson.

M. Night Shyamalan brings together the narratives of two of his standout originals—2000’s Unbreakable, from Touchstone Pictures, and 2016’s Split, from Universal—in one explosive, all-new comic-book thriller: Glass.

From Unbreakable, Bruce Willis returns as David Dunn as does Samuel L. Jackson as Elijah Price, known also by his pseudonym Mr. Glass.  Joining from Split are James McAvoy, reprising his role as Kevin Wendell Crumb and the multiple identities who reside within, and Anya Taylor-Joy as Casey Cooke, the only captive to survive an encounter with The Beast.

Following the conclusion of SplitGlass finds Dunn pursuing Crumb’s superhuman figure of The Beast in a series of escalating encounters, while the shadowy presence of Price emerges as an orchestrator who holds secrets critical to both men.

Joining the all-star cast are Unbreakable’s Spencer Treat Clark and Charlayne Woodard, who reprise their roles as Dunn’s son and Price’s mother, as well as Golden Globe Award winner Sarah Paulson (American Horror Story series).

This riveting culmination of his worldwide blockbusters is produced by Shyamalan and Blumhouse Production’s Jason Blum, who also produced the writer/director’s previous two films for Universal.  They produce again with Ashwin Rajan and Marc Bienstock, and Steven Schneider, who executive produces.

GLASS – IN CINEMAS JANUARY 17

J.J Abrams (Star Trek, Star Wars: The Force Awakens) has been keeping the whole world guessing with his new film Overlord. We know the film is directed by Julius Avery (Son Of A Gun, Jerrycan) and stars Wyatt Russell (Everybody Wants Some, 22 Jump Street) and Pilou Asbaek (Game Of Thrones, Ben-Hur) but the rest peope are just guessing about. Now we get to learn a little more as Paramount drops the film’s final trailer.