Category: Film Genre

 

For a strictly limited season, Cameron Mackintosh’s spectacular sell-out staged concert version of Boublil & Schönberg’s legendary musical, Les Misérables – The Staged Concert will be shown in cinemas across Australia from February 27 from the Gielgud Theatre in London. 

Seen by over 120 million people worldwide, Les Misérables is undisputedly one of the world’s most popular musicals – and now Les Misérables – The Staged Concert is the must-see event for all fans of musical theatre and live event cinema. Tickets are on sale now.

Leading an outstanding cast and orchestra of over 65 are Michael Ball (Javert), Alfie Boe (Jean Valjean), Carrie Hope Fletcher (Fantine) and Matt Lucas (Thénardier), who perform the songs I Dreamed A Dream, Bring Him Home, One Day MoreOn My Own and many more.  This sensational cinematic live event is not to be missed. 

Cameron Mackintosh said: “The extraordinary sell-out success and response to our spectacular new theatrical concert staging of Les Misérables has been phenomenal so we are thrilled to give cinema audiences around Australia the opportunity to experience this stunning production. Starring our entirely brilliant London cast headed by Michael Ball, Alfie Boe, Carrie Hope Fletcher and Matt Lucas, our 16 week limited season at the Gielgud sold out in a few days but now you can storm the barricades to ensure you catch this thrilling live performance direct from the West End in a cinema near you. For the masses of disappointed fans who couldn’t get to see this amazing concert in London this live event will be a unique shared experience of thrilling drama, glorious music and sensational singing performed by an amazing all-star cast and orchestra of over 65 – the like of which you will have never seen before.  If you have ever Dreamed a Dream – this is it!”

Cameron Mackintosh presents Boublil & Schönberg’s legendary musical Les Misérables – The Staged Concert. Based on the novel by Victor Hugo Music by Claude-Michel Schönberg Lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer Original French Text by Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel.

 

Summary: Two young British soldiers during the First World War are given an impossible mission: deliver a message deep in enemy territory that will stop 1,600 men, and one of the soldiers’ brothers, from walking straight into a deadly trap.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 9st January 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 30th January 2020

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States, United Kingdom

Director: Sam Mendes

Screenwriter: Sam Mendes, Krysty Wilson-Ciarns

Cast: Benjamin Adams (Sergeant Harrop), Gabriel Akuwudike (Private Buchanan), Andy Apollo (Sergeant Miller),  Daniel Attwell (Captain Sandbach), Elliott Baxter (Private Singer), Jacob James Beswick (Lance Corporal Duff), Anson Boon (Private Cooke), Pip Carter (Lieutenant Gordon), Dean Charles-Chapman (Lance Corporal Blake), Bradley Connor (Sergeant Gardner), Samson Cox-Vinell (Orderly Dixon), Benedict Cumberbatch (Colonel McKenzie), Josef Davies (Private Stokes), Claire Duburcq (Lauri), Elliott Edusah (Private Grey), Justin Edwards (Captain Ivins), Colin Firth (General Erinmore), Tommy French (Private Butler), Kenny Fullwood (Private Rossi), John Hollingworth (Sergeant Guthrie), Luke Hornsby (Private Pinewood), Gerran Howell (Private Parry), Adam Hugill (Private Atkins), Michael Jibson (Lieutenant Hutton), Taddeo Kufus (Soldat Baumer), Jonny Lavelle (Orderly Byrne), Spike Leighton (Private Kilgour), Merlin Leonhardt (Soldat Muller), George MacKay (Lance Corporal Schofield), Richard Madden (Lieutenant Joseph Blake), Daniels Mays (Sergeant Sanders), Richard McCabe (Colonel Collins), Joe Mendes (Private Willock), Ryan Nolan (Private Malky), Jamie Parker (Lieutenant Richards), Billy Postlethwaite (NCO Harvey), Nabhaan Rizwan (Sepoy Jondalar), Michael Rouse (Captain Rylands), Jonah Russell (Captain Morahan), Adrian Scarborough (Major Hepburn), Andrew Scott (Lieutenant Leslie), Jack Shalloo (Private Seymour), Mark Strong (Captain Smith), Paul Tinto (NCO Baker), Chris Walley (Private Bullen), Ian Wilson (Sergeant Wright)

Running Time: 119 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR 1917 REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

Over the years the cinematic world has been blessed with some pretty amazing war films. Think of the sheer emotional nature of films like Schindler’s List and Hacksaw Ride or the epic sale of films like Saving Private Ryan and Pearl Harbor. It feels like it is the war genre when some of the truly great filmmakers of our generation have really had a chance to show us what they are capable of an that legacy certainly continues with 1917.

As a filmmaker Sam Mendes has certainly proved himself to be one of the most ‘intense’ of the modern generation. That intensity has been delivered with powerful drama and dialogue in films like American Beauty and Revolutionary Road while it also returned through the power of stunts and action with his trip into the Bond universe with Skyfall and Spectre. With 1917 Mendes manages to fuse both of his skills in drama and his style of action together in a way that results with a unique film that will go down as one of the finest in 2020.

Plot wise 1917 is quite basic. It is set during World War I in France and General Erinmore (Colin Firth – A Single Man) receives word that an Allied attack is going to be walking right into a trap set by the Germans. In a desperate bid to stop the annihilation of 1600 men he gives Lance Corporal Blake (Dean-Charles Chapman Game Of Thrones) and Lance Corporal Schofield (George MacKay – Peter Pan) a near impossible task. He asks them to go through the front-line and go behind the enemy line to deliver a letter that should stop the attack from ever happening.

In a lot of ways the style Mendes uses to tell the story is very similar to what Peter Jackson used with The Lord Of The Rings. The film itself entirely surrounds the impossible journey that the two embark on yet somehow Mendes stops the film from every becoming boring at all. Around every corner he places a new task and obstacle in the way of the pair and his idea of using a one-shot technique means that the audience is right there amongst the action. Whether it be urgently pushing past soldiers in the trenches, battling to swim against a raging river or coming under heavy enemy fire Mendes has the audience right there beside the heroes which only further enhances the suspense and intensity throughout the film.

Surprisingly the screenplay which Mendes co-wrote with Krysty Wilson-Cairns (Penny Dreadful) also keeps the dialogue to the bare minimum. For a lot of the film the pair either use silence or brief but powerful dialogue to get some in-depth points across. At one point Blake and Schofield debate whether war medals really mean anything or not, and while some writers would let it take up five minutes of the film Mendes and Wilson-Cairns let both characters make their point within a minute. Likewise anything we learn about the two men is fitted nicely into some of the most natural dialogue you will ever hear on the screen.

Such is Mendes’ maturity as a filmmaker that he never allows the action sequences to ever take anything away from the drama of the film. Plane crashes and enemy fire occur in real time and while it does have the audience on the edge of their seat Mendes never allows it to over-shadow the film’s major storyline or detract from it.

I have heard some people suggest that the film would have been further enhanced if the two leads had been more recognisable actors, but I fail to see how that would have helped. Chapman and MacKay put in absolutely brilliant performances and there could be very little more asked of them. The two share some very poignant scenes together and in all honestly they carry the film throughout as the camera never leaves them. Very few young actors could pull off such an intense acting performance but these two seem to do it with ease.

1917 is one of those films that leaves you in complete stunned silence as you watch it. Mendes never allows his audience to rest, instead he takes them on the journey with his two heroes using camera angles we haven’t seen since The Children Of Men. Yes at times 1917 feels utterly claustrophobic but it is also a visual delight that will find its audience going through a range of emotions as they view it. This film is a true classic that will be savoured by true movie lovers.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  1917 (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment 1917 Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

You ever hear the one about the cop, the songbird, the psycho and the mafia princess? “Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn)” is a twisted tale told by Harley herself, as only Harley can tell it. When Gotham’s most nefariously narcissistic villain, Roman Sionis, and his zealous right-hand, Zsasz, put a target on a young girl named Cass, the city is turned upside down looking for her. Harley, Huntress, Black Canary and Renee Montoya’s paths collide, and the unlikely foursome have no choice but to team up to take Roman down.

Directed by Cathy Yan, the film stars Margot Robbie, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Jurnee Smollett-Bell, Rosie Perez,  Chris Messina, Ewan McGregor and Ella Jay Basco.

BIRDS OF PREY releases in Australia in theatres on February 6, 2020.

 

Twentieth Century Fox in association with Marvel Entertainment presents The New Mutants, an original horror thriller set in an isolated hospital where a group of young mutants is being held for psychiatric monitoring. When strange occurrences begin to take place, both their new mutant abilities and their friendships will be tested as they battle to try and make it out alive. Directed by Josh Boone and written by Josh Boone & Knate Lee, The New Mutants stars: Maisie Williams, Anya Taylor-Joy, Charlie Heaton, Alice Braga, Blu Hunt and Henry Zaga. The film is produced by Simon Kinberg, p.g.a., Karen Rosenfelt, p.g.a. and Lauren Shuler Donner with Stan Lee and Michele Imperato Stabile serving as executive producers.

The film will be released on April 9th.

 

 

Summary: A British drug lord tries to sell off his highly profitable empire to a dynasty of Oklahoma billionaires.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 1st January 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 30th January 2020

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Guy Ritchie

Screenwriter: Guy Ritchie, Ivan Atkinson (story), Marn Davies (story)

Cast: Childi Ajufo (Bunny), Brittany Ashworth (Ruby), George Asprey (Lord Snowball), Russell Balogh (Russell), Max Bennett (Brown), Bruce Chong (Npuc), Michelle Dockery (Rosalind Pearson), Gershwyn Eustache Jnr. (Roger), Christopher Evangelou (Primetime), Colin Farrell (Coach), Henry Golding (Dry Eye), Hugh Grant (Fletcher), Tom Rhys Harries (Power Noel), Charlie Hunnam (Ray), Togo Igawa (Wang Yong), Jack Jones (Nick), Eugenia Kuzmina (Misha), Matthew McConaughey (Mickey Pearson), Lyne Renee (Jackie), Jeremy Strong (Matthew), Eliot Sumner (Laura Pressfield), James Warren (Iron Chin), Samuel West (Lord Pressfield), Jason Wong (Phuc), Tom Wu (George), Jon Xue Zhang (Fat Tony)

Running Time: 113 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR THE GENTLEMEN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

Nobody quite does gangster film the way Guy Ritchie does. Ritchie basically made the genre his own after re-inventing it with modern day classics like Lock, Stock And Two Smoking Barrells and Snatch. And while cinema goers have enjoyed Ritichie’s take on Sherlock Holmes and The Man From U.N.C.L.E. nothing he has done in recent years has ever captured that true magic of his early films… that was until now. Yes The Gentlemen sees Ritchie return to the gangster genre but also sees him return to form with his creativity and stunning scriptwriting.

The film centres around Mickey Pearson (Matthew McConaughey – Dallas Buyers Club) a gangster who has built a budding marijuana business across England. However when Mickey is shot in a bar a private investigator turned wannaba screenwriter named Fletcher (Hugh Grant – Love Actually) is employed by a newspaper to investigate the case. Not happy with his fee though Fletcher decides to cash-in and try to blackmail Mickey’s right-hand man Ray (Charlie Hunnam – Pacific Rim) with a meandering tale that also involves other crime figures like Dry Eye (Henry Golding – Last Christmas) and Coach (Colin Farrell – The Lobster).

The Gentlemen screams creativity from the get go. Ritchie doesn’t make the film an easy watch for the audience. The story doesn’t play in order instead the audience is fed bits and pieces of information from a myriad of sources and at times it is up to them to work out what his truth or lie. Of course Ritchie also throws in the odd red herring to try and put you off the scent and the result is a heightened sense of suspense as you are never really sure what is true, right down to character’s deaths, until it is spelled out for you in actual black and white.

In true Ritchie style the way the plot is presented is also a stroke of genius. Having Fletcher recount the story for Ray not only gives the filmmaker a way to show the different variations of the truth in a creative way but also allows Grant and Hunnam to have an amazing screen presence that both actors seem to embrace with two hands. Grant is truly sensational and despite a long career to date this is easily his best ever role. While the film is not a comedy Grant uses his comedic timing to further enhance the character of Fletcher and make him someone truly memorable. Nearly all of the scenes that the two actors share together feel like an intense theatre production and there is no sign of weak acting anywhere to be seen.

Of course with the all the theatrics and creativity that Ritchie shows with this film he could probably be excused if it were being used to cover up a weak storyline but that certainly isn’t the case here. The story is an absolute gem, made up of unique characters who seem out to only aid their business dealings while not really caring what they do or who they have to crush to get what they want. And while there seems to be a never-ending amount of characters being included in the story you never seem to lose track of who is who and more importantly who works with who.

Anyone planning on going to see The Gentlemen should be warned though that while we have entered into a time of political correctness Ritchie seems to ignore that with this film. The language is perhaps the most extreme we have seen in cinema for awhile (but it does fit with the storyline) and of course this wouldn’t be a Ritchie gangster film if there wasn’t a couple of very violent on-screen deaths as well.

We mentioned earlier the brilliant performances of Grant and Hunnam but really there are a number of other actors who deserve credit for their work as well. Once again Matthew McConaughey shows why he is one of the best character actors going around at the moment while the big surprise here might be the performance of Henry Golding who breaks the shackles of his normal nice-guy persona by playing the very untrustworthy Dry Eye. Then of course there is Hollywood’s forgotten man Colin Farrell who seems to be having a ball playing the slimy Coach.

As far as gangster films go there are none better than The Gentlemen. This is a true cinema tour de force that delivers a headbutt to the face of its audience. It leaves in shock, it leaves you in awe but beyond all else this is a film that you will want to watch over and over again. Guy Ritchie is a true magician of a filmmaker and with The Gentlemen he delivers some good old-fashioned creative magic.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating: The Gentlemen (2020) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment The Gentlemen Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

When an unidentified woman is found brutally murdered, evidence discovered at the scene links to a 20-year-old unsolved crime. What begins as a routine investigation exposes something more insidious, as political corruption and shady business dealings intertwine with sinister crimes and occult practices.

The thrilling eight-part series stars Emma Booth (Glitch) and Ewen Leslie (The Cry) Martin Henderson (Grey’s Anatomy), Aaron Pedersen (Mystery Road) and Rena Owen (Siren), with a stellar director lineup including Michael Rymer (American Horror Story), Greg McLean (Stan Original Series Wolf Creek) and Sian Davies (Wentworth).

Summary: Jo March reflects back and forth on her life, telling the beloved story of the March sisters – four young women each determined to live life on their own terms.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 1st January 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 9th January 2020

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Greta Gerwig

Screenwriter: Greta Gerwig, Louisa May Alcott

Cast: Dash Barber (Fred Vaughn), Timothee Charlamet (Theodore ‘Laurie’ Laurence), Chris Cooper (Mr. Laurence), J.M. Davis (Susan Robbins), Laura Dern (Marmee March), Lilly Englert (Kate Vaughn), Sasha Frolova (Mrs. Hummel), Louie Garrel (Friedrich Bhaer), Jayne Houdeyshell (Hannah), Ana Kayne (Olivia), Tom Kemp (Asa Melvin), Charlotte Kinder (Viola), Adrianne Krstansky (Mrs. Dashwood), Tracy Letts (Mr. Dashwood), Bill Mootos (Mr. Davis), Jen Nikolaisen (Evelyn Meriweather), James Norton (John Brooke),  Bob Odenkirk (Father March), Maryanne Plunkett (Mrs. Kirke), Florence Pugh (Amy March), Abby Quinn (Annie Moffat), Jared Reinfeldt (Ned Moffat), Hadley Robinson (Sallie Gardiner Moffat), Saoirse Ronan (Jo March), Amber Leanne Rothberg (Young Meg), Eliza Scanlen (Beth March), Meryl Streep (Aunt March), Emma Watson (Meg March), Lewis D. Wheeler (Josiah Workman)

Running Time: 135 mins

Classification: G (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR LITTLE WOMEN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

Timeless tales never die. That is the only defence you can really use against people who are convinced that the new adaption of Little Women should never have been made. Yes, there have been a number of cinematic versions of Louisa May Alcott’s classic tale that have made it to the big screen over the years, but every adaption has its own tone and feel and that is what makes them unique. I can remember the same being said when Baz Luhrmann re-created Romeo + Juliet… and look how well that ended up turning out. Besides after the quirkiness of Ladybird how could anybody not be curious to see what Greta Gerwig was going to do with Alcott’s classic.

Gerwig does do little to change the basic storyline. The film is set in 1868 with Jo March (Saoirse Ronan – Brooklyn), a budding young writer getting a story published by a local publisher. At the same time her work is heavily criticised by one of her co-workers and in a bid to escape how she feels about it she uses the fact that her sister, Beth (Eliza Scanlen – Sharp Objects) is sick to return home. As she spends time with her mother (Laura Dern – Wild) and her other two sisters, Meg (Emma Watson – Harry Potter & The Philospher’s Stone) and Amy (Florence Pugh – The Commuter) she reflects on their lives and the obstacles they have overcome.

A scathing critic would probably try to point out that Little Women’s main focus is on female empowerment but I would argue that Gerwig’s film goes even deeper than that. This is not simply a film about female empowerment this is the film that explores the notion of how a family pulls together to overcome some of the most turbulent and life-changing obstacles that anybody can face. From the harsh fights between Amy and Jo, through the four sisters having to face numerous struggles with their father is off at war this is more a film about family then it is anything else.

The power of this version of Little Women though is how much the film draws you into the character’s lives. At a quick glance the character of Jo could be considered cold-hearted especially towards the men in her life, including Laurie (Timothee Chalamet – Beautiful Boy). But through the power of Gerwig’s writing and directing the audience gets to see what makes Jo this way and that is something that can’t be said for all versions of Little Women. Gerwig also allows the film to show the struggle of the artist as well – whether it be a writer, a painter or a teacher all find themselves tested during this time of war and this secondary element to the plot adds a powerful element to the film that continues to draw the audience in.

What also drives this film is a repeat of one of the strengths from Lady Bird. As a director it is obvious that Gerwig knows how to draw the best out of her cast. Here Saoirse Ronan is once again in award winning form and she is well supported by Emma Watson and Florence Pugh who both seem to have turned up their acting game several levels as well. In regards to Ronan though she is well directed by Gerwig with the scene of the final confrontation between herself and Laurie being an absolute highlight. The raw emotion that is generated from the screen during the scene is a rarity in modern day cinema and needs to be cherished.

A special mention must also be made to Meryl Streep (The Devil Wears Prada). While she has limited screen time she managed to steal every scene she was in with a truly powerful performance. Her scenes with both Saoirse Ronan and Florence Pugh are some of the best examples of brilliant acting you will all year. There is a real power with those scenes and neither younger actress seems to be over-awed by the fact that they are sharing the scene with acting royalty.

Every adaption of Little Women has something that sets it apart from the others but few have the sheer emotion and power that we see here with Gerwig’s interpretation. Here Gerwig uncovers secret layers to the plot that lesser filmmakers would have not noticed while at the same time she directs one of the most talented younger casts that modern day cinema has ever seen assembled. If you leave in preconceived notions you have about Little Woman at the cinema door you will find yourself totally drawn into this worthy drama.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating: Little Women (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment LittleWomen Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

Summary: When the world’s best spy is turned into a pigeon, he must rely on his nerdy tech officer to save the world.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 1st January 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 9th January 2020

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Nick Bruno, Troy Quane

Screenwriter: Brad Copeland, Lloyd Taylor

Cast: Rachel Brosnahan (Wendy (voice), Jarrett Bruno (Young Walter/Pigeon Voice (voice)), Min-Hyuck Jang (Joon (voice)), DJ Khaled (Ears (voice)), Karen Gillan (Eyes (voice)), Tom Holland (Walter (voice)), Carla Jimenez (Geraldine (voice)), Rashida Jones (Macy (voice)), Peter S. Kim (Joon (voice)), Reba McEntire (Joyless (voice)), Ben Mendelsohn (Killian (voice)), Masi Oka (Kimura (voice)), Will Smith (Lance (voice)), Youn So (Soo-Min (voice)), Randy Trager (Terrance/Pigeon Voice (voice)),

Running Time: 102 mins

Classification: PG (Australia) G (Thailand)

 

 

OUR SPIES IN DISGUISE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

A film where a super-hero turns into a pigeon shouldn’t work, no even the notion of such a film would probably have you laughing and wondering whether or not the film deserves to be placed in the same pile as the ridiculous Sharknado. But let the laughter subside because somehow Spies In Disguise not only works but is pure entertainment from start to finish.

The fact that the film works is probably good news for Will Smith (Men In Black) who certainly needs a winner after the absolute shocker that was Gemini Man. In this animation Smith voices Lance Sterling, the greatest spy the world has ever seen. However Sterling’s career is placed in jeopardy when he comes up against arch-villain Killian (Ben Mendolsohn – Ready Player One) who frames Sterling and makes it look like he is using a killer drone to do his own dirty work.

Sterling vows to clear his name when he is confronted by an eager young agent named Marcy Kappel (Rashida Jones – The Social Network) who is hellbent on arresting him. However when Sterling is escaping he is forced to take the nerdy and socially inept inventor Walter (Tom Holland – Spider-Man: Far From Home) with him after he accidentally drinks a liquid that turns him into a pigeon. Now with the lives of many in danger it is up to the Sterling pigeon and the out-of-his-depth Walter to try and save the day.

Like we mentioned previously the whole film’s premise sounds so far out of this world that it simply wouldn’t work, but somehow the screenplay by Brad Copeland (Wild Hogs) and Lloyd Taylor (The Wild) pulls everything together and has it work perfectly. To put it simply the film works because Copeland and Taylor never try to make this film anything that it’s not. They know the premise of the film is ridiculous and they simply go with that ‘flow.’ When Sterling is in human form they make the film a serviceable James Bond parody and when he is pigeon form they are gifted enough comedy writers to be able to introduce an influx of bird jokes and slap-stick comedy that is actually funny.

Perhaps the most important thing though is that Copeland and Taylor alongside the film’s two directors Nick Bruno (first time director) and Troy Quane (The Smurfs: A Christmas Carol) have given this film heart. Never at any time when you watch this film do you feel that this was a film made just to generate some cash at the box office. Yes despite the whole ridiculous nature of the film’s premise from start to finish this feels like a film that was made by a group of people who genuinely believed in the story at hand. The result is a film that will be lapped up by its audience as it goes from a moment of true comedy through to a far-fetched action sequence that totally works and will then rest for a moment as it explores the notion that Walter is actually emotionally hurt by some of the more traumatic events that have occurred during his life. It is moments like that that makes Spies In Disguise resonate so well with its audience.

The team behind this film also completely nailed the voice casting of the film. Will Smith is the absolute perfect choice to play a cooler-than-cool spy while Tom Holland shows real style as he branches out and gives Walter real characterisation through his vocal work alone. At no point in the film did his unique Spider-Man voice become apparent which was something I was worried about when first sitting down to watch the film.

While expecting very little from Spies In Disguise this was one animation that really surprised me. Like Teen Titans Go To The Movies and Planet 51 before it Spies In Disguise manages to overcome the obstacle of having a ridiculous premise and somehow becomes a film that reminds you just how magical cinema can be sometimes. While some of the violence of the film may not make it friendly for younger children this is certainly a film that will be enjoyed by kids who are older enough to sit down and enjoy something like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Maybe you still think Spies In Disguise sounds like a ridiculous waste of time but trust me you write off this film at your own peril.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Spies in Disguise (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment SpiesIn Disguise Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

 

Summary: In Jumanji: The Next Level, the gang is back but the game has changed. As they return to rescue one of their own, the players will have to brave parts unknown from arid deserts to snowy mountains, to escape the world’s most dangerous game.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th December 2019

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 25th December 2019

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Jake Kasdan

Screenwriter: Jake Kasdan, Jeff Pinkner, Scott Rosenburg, Chris Van Allsburg (book)

Cast: Awkwafina (Ming Fleetfoot), MichaelBeaslley (Coach Davis), Sarah Bennani (Andi Tow), Jack Black (Professor Sheldon ‘Shelly’ Oberon), Ser’Darius Blain (Anthony ‘Fridge’ Johnson), John Ross Bowie (Cavendish), Rhys Darby (Nigel Billingsworth), Danny DeVito (Edward ‘Eddie’ Gilpin), Massi Furlan (Switchblade), Karen Gillan (Ruby Roundhouse), Danny Glover (Milo Walker), Colin Hanks (Alex Vreeke), Kevin Hart (Franklin ‘Mouse’ Finbar), Jared Hasmuk (Dagfin), Madison Iseman (Bethany Walker), Dwayne Johnson (Dr. Smolder Bravestone), Nick Jonas (Jefferson ‘Seaplane’ McDonough), Sal Longobardo (Tony), Rory McCann (Jorgen The Brutal), Bebe Neuwirth (Nora Shepherd), Deobia Oparei (Gromm), Dania Ramirez (Flame), Ashley Scott (Ashley),  Morgan Turner (Martha Kapley)

Running Time: 123 mins

Classification: PG (Australia) G (Thailand)

 

 

OUR JUMANJI: THE NEXT LEVEL REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

Cinema fans rejoice the true dream team are back. Yes a team made up of Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart and Jack Black may seem like a strange line-up for what is essentially an action adventure film, but nobody gets things done like these guys do. No one seemed to predict just how successful of a film Jumanji: Welcome To The Jungle was going to be back in 2019 and once again people seem caught out but the arrival of the latest film in the franchise and just how good it is.

Picking up a few years after the events of Welcome To The Jungle we find our original players coming together for the first time since they graduated from High School. Spencer (Alex Wolff) and Martha (Morgan Turner) have split up and Spencer finds himself in a rut that sees him separate himself from his friends.

Determined to try and put some spark back into his life Spencer begins to put the Jumanji game back together and places himself back in the world of the video game. When they discover that he is missing his friends decide to go into the game to rescue him but in doing so accidentally take Spencer’s grandfather Eddie (Danny DeVito) and his ex-best friend Milo (Danny Glover) with them. From there it is once again up to the team of Ruby Roundhouse (Karen Gillan), Dr. Smolder Bravestone (Dwayne Johnson), Franklin Finbar (Kevin Hart) and the Professor (Jack Black) to once again save Jumanji.

With so many franchises staying beyond their welcome these days I can imagine there are a few people out there who are rolling their eyes and thinking ‘oh no, not another one’ when it comes to Jumanji. The good news though is director/screenwriter Jake Kasdan once again finds new ways to bring a freshness to the franchise. The inclusion of Danny DeVito and Danny Glover is the cast enhances this film in a way nobody could have predicted. As well as their character’s storyline adding a little bit more personal drama to the plot but seeing Kevin Hart and Dwayne Johnson have then to take on the characteristics off DeVito and Glover is absolutely priceless and shows both actors did have more range than many would have predicted. The same goes for Awkwafina who later has to carry the DeVito mantle and does it with brilliant comedic timing.

It is the comedy of Jumanji: The Next Level which also makes the film such a pleasure to watch. Kasdan seems to be able to mix genres throughout this film in a way that very few filmmakers can. Often a film that tries to mix comedy, drama and action would feel disjointed but here Kasdan can go from a scene of pure comedy between Johnson and Hart to an action sequence where all the characters’ lives are placed in danger and it seems just perfectly natural.

The big difference this time around is that the action scenes, excuse the pun, feel like they have gone to the next level. The ostrich attack and the monkey battle on swinging bridges are right up there as some of the best action sequences that you will see in cinemas this year and they only further enhance the video game feel that the film portrays throughout.

As we mentioned earlier Dwayne Johnson and Kevin Hart steal the show as they try to mimic Danny DeVito and Danny Glover. Hart actually produces some of the best acting of his career as he portrays a character who feels like he owes his former best friend a lot but just can’t break away from his bad habit of over-explaining things. Credit must also be paid to Karen Gillan who is sensational when it comes to the action and fighting sequences throughout the film showing why she is one of the most under-rated action stars going around.

It has taken nearly all year to get there but Jumanji: The Next Level is one of the most enjoyable action films of this year. The film has the right mix of drama, comedy and action and contains one of the best ensemble casts we’ve seen on the big screen for a long time.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating: Jumanji: The Next Level (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Jumanji: The Next Level Reviews: N/A

Trailer: