Category: Horror

A Night OF Horror Film Festival

Sensoria

 

 

 

Summary: Traumatised by a series of losses in her life the recently divorced Caroline (Lanna Olsson) finds herself suddenly living in a strange apartment alienated from everything she once took for granted. Surrounded by peculiar neighbours and with disturbing, inexplicable events increasing in frequency, Caroline struggles to make sense of her new circumstances. Is her mental illness getting the best of her? Is she just struggling to adapt to living alone? Or is there something more sinister at hand?

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Sweden

Director: Christian Hallman

Screenwriter: Christian Hallman, Mans F.G. Tunberg

Cast: Norah Andeson (My Jansson), Karin Bertling (Vera Brandt), Boel Larsson (Elsa Ullman), Harald Leander (Frank Mandel), Alida Morberg (Emma Trelkovski), Lanna Olsson (Caroline Menard), Rafael Pettersson (Johan Steiner), Linnea Pihl (The Girl)

Runtime: 81 mins

Classification: CTC

 

OUR SENSORIA REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

The Scandinavian film industry has delivered some brilliantly hard edged movies over the past few years – The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo and Let The Right One In spring straight to mind – and now horror fans are about to start raving about the release of a brand new film from Sweden with Sensoria certainly deserving to be described as one of the horror films of the years.

Directed by first time feature film director Christian Hallman (who is mainly known for his involvement with several film festivals across Europe) Sensoria is the kind of film that keeps you guessing while you are watching it and then stays with you for a long time after the final credits have rolled. Hallman sets up so many David Lynch like characters in the apartment building that when things first start happening to Caroline you can’t help but wonder is it the strange bossy lady, the blind man who quickly learns way too much about Caroline or the creepy Steiner who has date-rapist written all over him. About the last thing you actually expect is the twist that Hallman delivers, a twist that is so good that Sensoria deserves to be put into the truly memorable horror films category.

Sensoria really does show that Christian Hallman is a director to watch over the years. While many carry on about the fact that films like The Conjuring or Insidious have you on the edge of your seat, the weak amount of suspense that those films generate is nothing compared to what Hallman manages to create with Sensoria. Even better is the fact that he manages to do it without falling into that whole found-footage genre or having to rely on blood and gore to do what he wants to do… and that is send some chills down the spine of the audience.

Teaming up with Hallman here is cinematographer Janssen Herr who also helps give Sensoria the look and feel that makes it so special. Very few filmmaking teams in the world can make a simple thing like water dripping from a tap so eerie, but that is something that these two manage eerily well. Together Hallman and Herr actually make the apartment building a character in itself and at times you are left wondering whether it is the actual building that is the horror that is taunting Caroline.

Sensoria also allows some acting talent to burst onto the scenes as well. Lanna Olsson really reveals herself as an actress with great range as she plays the traumatised Caroline very well. Whether it be a suspenseful moment in a bath tub, a freaky encounter with a neighbour or even a dramatic scene in which she pours her heartache out to her best friend Olsson’s range allows her to never fall below par. She is also well supported by child actress, Norah Anderson who writes herself into horror film folklore and steals a lot of the scenes that she is performing in.

While it may have flown under the radar for many horror fans Sensoria is a film that needs to be checked out. Christian Hallman reveals himself as a horror director with a big future ahead of him while the films mash of Scandinavian horror and J-horror creepiness makes it a complete stand-out.
Stars(4.5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4.5)

 

IMDB Rating:
Sensoria (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Sensoria reviews: Nil

Trailer:

 

 

The Visit

Summary: Young filmmaker Becca (Olivia DeJonge) and her wannabe rapper brother Tyler (Ben Oxenbould) decide to visit their Nana (Deanna Dunagan) and Pop Pop (Peter McRobbie) for the first time when their mother (Kathryn Hahn) decides to take some time out and go on a cruise.

At first the pair are excited about their visit and Becca decides that the trip would make a good subject for a documentary. However, things start to become creepy for the two when their grandparents start acting strange and they are forbidden to leave their bedrooms after bedtime. Is something sinister occurring?

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th September 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: M. Night Shyamalan

Screenwriter: M. Night Syamalan

Cast: Jorge Cordova (Miguel), Patch Darragh (Dr. Sam), Olivia DeJonge (Becca), Deana Dunagan (Nana), Kathryn Hahn (Mom), Ocean James (Young Becca), Benjamin Kanes (Dad), Celia Keenan-Bolger (Stacey), Shelby Lackman (J. Smith), Peter McRobbie (Pop Pop), Seamus Moroney (Young Tyler), Ed Oxenbould (Tyler)

Runtime: 94 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR THE VISIT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

There is no doubt about it the once promising career of filmmaker M. Night Shyamalan is on the rocks. He burst onto the scene with The Sixth Sense but then came average films like The Happening which were quickly followed by some of the worst movies ever made – The Last Airbender and After Earth. Well it seems as though Shyamalan listened to the public and the critics because he has decided to do something very different with his latest film The Visit. He goes right back to the drawing board and has decided to make a low budget film with a cast of virtual unknowns.

Now that might be enough to make some people groan, but it seems to be the right decision for Shyamalan as returning to  the basic style of filmmaking has meant that he has had to rely on a good script to impress the audience rather than millions of dollars worth of special effects. And I’ll admit it to my surprise he manages to pull it off very well with a film that has now even seemed to win horror fans… some of the hardest film lovers to impress.

Early on The Visit did have me wondering what the hell I had walked into as the character Tyler started to rap… yes rap like a poor man’s Eminem. After a while though I realised that Shyamalan had just inserted this to get some laughs from the audience or even to make this film a little bit different, no instead this was something that had been lacking from his films for quite a while – characterisation. With the important aspect of a screenplay welcomed back Shymalan then takes his audience on a journey that provides a more than enough scares along the way, with the odd chuckle and then delivers its payload with a twist that actually drew sounds of amazement and fear out of the audience I was sitting with. Yes Shymalan has not only managed to deliver a horror with a mix of comedy, but also made that a damn good horror film at the same time.

It does feel that The Visit’s fairytale style story allows Shyamalan to take a journey make to his childhood and he mostly seems to do this through the character of Becca who you can easily imagine is the female version of what the wannabe-filmmaker teenage Shymalan would have been like. Maybe it’s because of this personal touch or perhaps because the film actually works but this was one time when the ‘found footage’ style of filmmaking didn’t make me want to leave the cinema.

Of course one of the dangers of making a low budget film with no names acting is that the acting is going to be below par but that certainly isn’t the case here. Peter McRobbie and Deanna Dunagan bring a brilliant level of creepiness to this film while the young Australian stars Ed Oxenbould and Olivia DeJonge put in mature performances well above their ages. This is something that fans of Australian television series Puberty Blues have come to expect from Oxenbould and he continue to shape himself to be one of the big international stars of the future.

Well its official people, it has taken a few bombs along the way but M. Night Shyamalan is back with one of the most impressive horror flicks of the year. The back to basics storytelling approach that Shyamalan takes with The Visit results in a horror flick with an amazing twist that is guaranteed to provide a few scares for its audience.

 

Stars(3.5)

 

The following is David Griffiths’ second The Visit review which originally appeared in Heavy Magazine

While it may have been bombarded by the amount of blockbusters that have been released recently new horror thriller The Visit is actually a film that has a lot riding on it – the most important thing being the career of its writer/director M. Night Shyamalan. Shymalan was once the talk of Hollywood thanks to the fact that his film The Sixth Sense was classed as a classic, but since then Shyamalan has never reached those heights again and his past two films The Last Airbender and After Earth saw him get crucified by critics and film lovers so badly he now needs a hit film to get some credibility back.

The Visit is a brave choice for Shymalan. It has a small budget, stars virtual no-names and decides to mix comedy and horror together – two genres that sometimes meet to create little more than a car crash. Shymalan’s The Visit presents itself like a fairytale. A mother (Kathryn Hahn – We’re The Millers) reluctantly allows her children, budding filmmaker Becca (Olivia DeJonge – The Sisterhood Of Night) and wannabe rapper Tyler (Ed Oxenbould – Puberty Blues), to go and stay with her estranged parents. But then when the two kids arrive they find that Nana (Deanna Dunagan – Have A Little Faith) and Pop Pop’s (Peter McRobbie – Lincoln) behavior is strange to say the least.

The great news horror fan is that The Visit sees Shymalan back at his creepy best. He takes some huge gambles with this film and luckily they all pay off. Sure early on when young Tyler bursts into some pretty ordinary rapping you might groan but stick with it because that is just setting up his character and soon you find yourself embedded in an old style horror film that actually has enough scares to have you jumping in your seat. Oh and there is one hell of a twist that will leave you screaming WTF!!! Yes, it is such a surprise you will actually say it out loud.

Even the fact that this is largely a ‘found footage’ film doesn’t hold it back and for once a screenplay actually manages to include a few humorous parts into what is actually a pretty frightening horror film. Young stars Olivia DeJone and Ed Oxenbould do Australia proud and once again cinema fans can start to get excited about a film with the name M. Night Symalan attached to it.

 

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full The Visit review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Nick Gardener:

 

You can hear Nick’s full The Visit review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147

 

Stars(3.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  The Visit (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment The Visit reviews: You can listen to our full The Visit  review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147. You can also read our The Vist review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Unfriended

Summary: A group of online chat room friends find themselves haunted by a mysterious, supernatural force using the account of their dead friend.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th April, 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Russia, United States, Poland, Germany, Puerto Rico

Director: Levan Gabriadze

Screenwriter: Nelson Greaves

Cast: Cal Barnes (Rando Pauls), Matthew Bohrer (Matt), Courtney Halverson (Val Rommel), Shelley Hennig (Blaire Lily), Renee Olstead (Jess Felton), Will Peltz (Adam Sewell), Mickey River (Dank Jimmy), Heather Sossaman (Laura Barns), Moses Storm (Mitch Roussel), Jacob Wysocki (Ken Smith)

Runtime: 83 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR UNFRIENDED REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Adam Ross:

You can hear Adam’s full Unfriended review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #127.

 

Stars(3)

 

 

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Unfriended review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Unfriended (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Unfriended reviews: You will also be able to hear our Unfriended review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #127.

Trailer:

It Follows

Summary: A chance sexual encounter for young Jay Height (Kelly Height) with her newfound boy, Hugh (Jake Weary) suddenly leaves her with an unwanted horror (slowly) following her around hellbent on killing her. But with more questions than answers raising their head Jay realises that this is a horror that could soon prove deadly to herself, her sister Kelly (Lili Sepe) and her friends Paul (Keir Gilchrist) and Yara (Olivia Luccardi).

Worse still seems to be the fact that the only way Jay can get rid of the horror is to pass it off by sleeping with somebody else. While it seems like Paul and the bad-boy-down-the-street Greg (Daniel Zovatto) are only too happy to take up that challenge Jay isn’t sure if she wants to pass this horror onto somebody else.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 16th April, 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: David Robert Mitchell

Screenwriter: David Robert Mitchell

Cast: Ele Bardha (Mr. Height), Keir Gilchrist (Paul), Ruby Harris (Mrs. Redmond), Olivia Luccardi (Yara), Maika Monroe (Jay Height), Leisa Pulido (Mrs. Hannigan), Lili Sepe (Kelly Height), Bailey Spry (Annie), Jake Weary (High/Jeff), Debbie Williams (Mrs. Height), Daniel Zovatto (Greg Hannigan)

Runtime: 100 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR IT FOLLOWS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Subtext in horror films over the years hasn’t exactly been subtle. Any horror film buff will tell that during the 1980s and 1990s there were a flood of horror films that wanted to ‘warn’ it’s audience using a video nasty to gets it’s point across. Whether the film was telling a babysitter to keep her eyes on the kids she was looking after rather than make out with her boyfriend or highlighting the fact that the kids doing drugs at the party were most likely to be the next slasher victim, the subtext in horror often worked if it were done well. Obviously paying attention to these films was director/screenwriter David Robert Mitchell (who directed 2010’s The Myth Of The American Sleepover), because his latest film, It Follows, tells a cautionary tale of promiscuous sex for all to see.

Perhaps it is because we have been starved of any decent horror flicks in general release cinema over the past couple of years but It Follows is a complete breath of fresh air in the horror genre. For once we aren’t lining up to see a film that isn’t a sequel, a remake or linked to The Conjuring in any way… and the good news is that it works.

There is something eerily special about It Follows despite its very simple storyline and its relatively low budget (around the two million dollar mark). For once we aren’t watching glamour teens getting sliced and diced, instead Mitchell’s teenagers feel like they are ripped out of a Larry Clarke film like Bully or Ken Park, they are ‘loser’ teens with not much money and a lot of time of their hands… and you know what that only goes to make this film feel even more natural. With Mitchell’s smart directional style that has the audience gasping every time an extra walks behind Jay and the cinematography style of Mark Gioulakis the film turns the suburbs into something dark and eerie in much the same way as films such as Acolytes or Dean O’Flaherty’s Beautiful. Once again that ups the stakes of the horror as the audience immediately relates to both the characters and the setting.

 

The fact that the script actually does call upon some characterization and acting by its cast also gives some of the young members a real chance to show Hollywood exactly what they are made of. Daniel Zovatti puts out an air of a dirty James Dean as he portrays hero ‘bad-boy’ Greg Hannigan while Maika Monroe puts in a thoughtful, tough and sometimes sultry portrayal of Jay. Surely on the back of this film she is going to be hot property in Hollywood. Almost stealing her thunder though is Keir Gilchrist whose puppy dog eyes often has the audience on his side, while his great mix of comedy and dramatic acting easily makes him a fan favourite.

It Follows is certainly a film for the true horror fanatic. Anyway expecting to tune in and get a few cheap thrills as someone gets hacked to death is in for a real surprise. While the film itself may kind of hark back to teenage horrors like Disturbing Behaviour or The Faculty David Robert Mitchell’s naturalistic style of filmmaking has ended up creating a smart horror with a very natural film to it. He is certainly a director to watch and let’s hope Hollywood doesn’t sully this film by making a ridiculous sequel… although one is rumored to already be in the works.

 

Stars(4)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating: It Follows (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment It Follows reviews: You will also be able to hear our It Follows review on an upcoming episode of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show.

Trailer:

Throwback

Summary: Jack (Shawn Brack) and Kent (Anthony Ring) are just two regular Aussie guys. They work together and dream of becoming rich, a plan that they feel is very close to being achieved when they find out a little more about the supposed riches of Thunderclap Newman (Andy Bramble) an outlaw who made the Australian bush his home during the pioneer days.

As Jack and Kent search for the loot though they soon find out that their friendship may not have ever been what they thought it was and with tensions at a high they suddenly find themselves faced with another enemy… the notorious Yowie that many feel is just an urban myth. Jack, Kent, local Park Ranger Rhiannon (Melanie Serafin) and local copper Detective McNab (Vernon Wells) now find themselves in a dangerous game of survival with this bloodthirsty beast.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: February, 2015

Country: Australia

Director: Travis Bain

Screenwriter: Tavis Bain

Cast: Shawn Brack (Jack), Andy Bramble (Thunderclap Newman), Warren Clements (The Yowie), Anthony Ring (Kent), Melanie Serafin (Rhiannon), Vernon Wells (Detective McNab)

Runtime: 93 mins

Classification: TBC

 

OUR THROWBACK REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

The best thing to come out of Monster Fest 2014 was just how many good genre filmmakers Australia still has. One person that needs to be added to that list is director/screenwriter Travis Bain who has delivered the exceptional Throwback, a creature feature made on such a small budget it wouldn’t even cover the catering budget for one day on most feature film shoots.

Now sometimes a low budget on a genre flick can be a bad thing. No money results in some pretty average special effects and a normally a creature that looks like it may have been borrowed from a Primary School theatre department. But that certainly isn’t the case with Throwback, a fantastic genre flick that deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as classics such as Razorback.

As a director Bain needs to be thrown a lot of praise. Throwback is a film that looks a million dollars and the fact that he chose an almost guerrilla style of filmmaking has meant that the Aussie bush has never looked more menacing. Bain also knows how to create tension throughout the film and for the most part of Throwback the audience sits there in complete silence and awe knowing that at any moment any character may meet their fate, either at the hands of another greedy human and thanks to the Yowie himself. The fact that ‘some’ of the characters are set-up as likable also means that the audience has a vested interest in wanting to see them pull through… now that isn’t something that happens in all horror flicks these days.

But of course the big test for a ‘creature feature’ is always how does the creature look and do the special effects look plausible. To Bain’s credit he gets a big tick in all the boxes. The Yowie (played by Warren Clements) looks so realistic that you may wonder whether or not going for a casual walk through the Aussie bush is such a great idea. The believability of the Yowie goes a long way in making this film work because it adds to the tension of scenes throughout the film instead of having the audience sniggering whenever the beast appears. The minimal special effects used also look pretty good and again adds to the film’s atmosphere.

Credit must also be paid to the cast of Throwback many of which were involved in this film for years. Shawn Brack, Anthony Ring and Melanie Serafin all put in great performances and as a cinema fan you can only hope that their performances here will lead to successful acting careers because they truly deserve it. Anthony Ring morphs into the ‘bad guy’ brilliantly well while Brack and Serafin’s natural performances make them instantly likable… believe it or not an important element when you are supposed to give a damn over whether they live or die.

Of course cult film fans are also in for a treat when it comes to the casting in Throwback because in a well scripted cameo the legendary Vernon Wells (who many would know from Mad Max 2 and opposite Arnold Schwarznegger in Commando) pops up in a strong performance as Detective McNab… a man desperate to solve the spate of murders that have been occurring in the area.

Ironically Throwback is a throwback to the legendary Aussie cult films that used to have a young Quentin Tarantino so excited. Edgy, suspenseful and nasty Throwback is a gem of a film that also reminds filmmakers and audiences out there that it is more than okay to throw in a good story line and well developed characters when you are making a creature feature. Throwback is the kind of film where you are literally on the edge of your seat throughout and it announces Travis Bain as one of Australia’s most promising directors… he is someone to add to your ‘watch where his career goes’ list. Throwback is a gem of a film that is a must see for horror fans everywhere.

 

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Throwback (2013) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Throwback reviews: For our full Throwback review make sure you check out The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #109.

Trailer:

Charlie's Farm Poster

Summary: For four friends it is supposed to be a weekend of fun… and of course love. Jason (Dean Kirkwright) and Natasha (Tara Reid) are a steady couple… although she thinks he can be a bit of an idiot sometimes. While Jason’s friend Donkey (Sam Coward) plans on using the weekend as a way to impress Melanie (Alliara Jacques).

The quartet decide to head to the legendary Charlie’s Farm, a farm that is was once the scene of a tragic murder spree instigated by John Wilson (Bill Moseley) who was then murdered by the town’s folk who were tired of the district getting a bad name for the number of backpackers who were going missing in the area.

While the four believe they may be able to find a few things of value at the farm to sell what they don’t expect to confront is John’s mentally disturbed son Charlie (Nathan Jones) who has called the property home since that bloody night.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 4th December, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Chris Sun

Screenwriter: Chris Sun

Cast: David Beamish (Gordon), Cameron Caulfield (Young Charlie Wilson), Sam Coward (Donkey), Mark E. Darin (Jacko), Lindsay Edgecomb (Sally), Genna Chanelle Hayes (Alyssa), Justin Gerardin (Peter), Kane Hodder (Tony Stewart), Allira Jacques (Melanie), Nathan Jones (Charlie Wilson), Madeline Kennedy (Amber), Dean Kirkwright (Jason), Bill Moseley (John Wilson), Darrell Plumridge (Young Blue), Tara Reid (Natasha), Trudi Ross (Merideth)

Runtime: 88 mins

Classification: R18+

 

OUR CHARLIE’S FARM REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

A lot of people seem to love being able to stick their boot into the Australian film industry at the moment. They can say what they will but it hasn’t prevented Australia from making some pretty decent films over the years. One of the genres that Australian filmmakers have excelled at over the years has been the horror genre. From the Ozploitation films of the 1970s and 1980s through to more modern day films like the underrated Cut that actually became a successful film in Europe, even the team behind the popular Saw franchise and all of its off-shoots also hail from Down Under.

One Australian genre director who has really been somebody to watch over the past few years has been writer/director/producer Chris Sun whose first two feature films, Daddy’s Little Girl and Come And Get Me, had many people labelling him as the next-big-thing. Given that he has also built up one of the best horror effects companies in the world (not just Australia) and it was easy to see why it was only a matter of time before he created an absolute horror gem. Now that may have arrived with Charlie’s Film a film that is going to be lapped up by those who have enjoyed films like Storm Warning… and once again reminds horror fans right around the world just how nasty Australian horror can be.

As a film itself Charlie’s Farm doesn’t bring much new to the genre. It is your standard slash, impale, crush and whatever style of horror but it is the fact that the film seems to elevate itself into the higher realm of this genre alongside the films of Rob Zombie that should fans of Australian cinema very excited. This is a return to good old fashioned horror that has audiences hollering in the cinema and you know it’s going to be lapped up by those that enjoy their horror on the hardcore side.

One of the most impressive things about Charlie’s Farm is that Chris Sun has built up such a reputation in the horror genre that he has been able to build up an absolute top notch horror cast. Alongside gifted locals like Dean Kirkwright (who shows enough to suggest he has big things ahead of him), Allira Jacques (who is becoming Australia’s next scream-queen) and Sam Coward (who provides great comedic relief), Sun has been able to assemble a cast that also consists of Rob Zombie’s go to man Bill Mossely, Sharknado’s scream-queen Tara Reid and horror legend Kane Hodder… better known as the man behind the Jason mask in the Friday The 13th franchise. Sun has also uncovered another star in former Aussie muscleman Nathan Jones who brings a presence to this film like Kane did to See No Evil. His physical appearance alone on screen is frightening and it won’t be too long before overseas horror directors are lining up to get this guy in their films.

Charlie’s Farm may not bring anything new to the horror table but its brute force is enough to make sure that this is a horror film that is certainly going to be noticed. Some of the dialogue may not be great, but seriously would anybody be expecting Shakespeare from this film, but the film has a load of suspense and the kind of slash gore that true fans of the genre are only too happy to cheer along to. This is one horror film that ticks all the boxes that you are going to be looking for in the genre.

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Yet to be rated.

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Charlie’s Farm reviews: For our full Charlie’s Farm review make sure you check out The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #108. You can also read Dave’s Charlie’s Farm review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Neighbours vs Zombies

It’s here ladies and gentlemen and ghouls… those residents from Ramsay Street are about to get a Halloween surprise with the arrival of zombies, and the good news is you can watch Neighbours vs Zombies right here… so strap yourself in and get set.

 

EPISODE FIVE

 

Director: Ric Forster, Louna Maroun

Writer: Ric Forster, Louna Maroun (story)

Stars: Stefan Dennis (Paul)Alan Fletcher (Karl), Kevin Harrington (David Bishop),  Aaron Jakubenko (Robbo Slade), Chris Milligan (Kyle),  Louna Maroun (Hope Gottlieb), Ben Nicholas (Stingray Timmins), Jenna Rosenow (Amber), Jackie Woodburne (Susan)

EPISODE FOUR

Director: Ric Forster, Louna Maroun

Writer: Ric Forster, Louna Maroun (story)

Stars: Stefan Dennis (Paul), Chloe Devitt (Dee), Alan Fletcher (Karl), Kevin Harrington (David Bishop),  Ryan Moloney (Toadie), Eve Morey (Sonya), Ben Nicholas (Stingray Timmins), Dan Paris (Drew Kirk), Jackie Woodburne (Susan)

EPISODE THREE

 

Director: Ric Forster, Louna Maroun

Writer: Ric Forster, Louna Maroun (story)

Stars: Josef Brown (Matt), Stefan Dennis (Paul), Alan Fletcher (Karl), Taylor Glockner (Mason Turner), Saskia Hampele (Georgia), Kevin Harrington (David Bishop),  Aaron Jakubenko (Robbo Slade), Louna Maroun (Hope Gottlieb), Ryan Moloney (Toadie), Eve Morey (Sonya), Ben Nicholas (Stingray Timmins), Dan Paris (Drew Kirk), Anthony Rentis (Robbo Double), Jenna Rosenow (Amber), Jackie Woodburne (Susan)

EPISODE TWO

 

Director: Ric Forster, Louna Maroun

Writer: Ric Forster, Louna Maroun (story)

Stars: Josef Brown (Matt), Stefan Dennis (Paul), Taylor Glockner (Mason Turner), Kevin Harrington (David Bishop),  Calen Mackenzie (Bailey), Louna Maroun (Hope Gottlieb), Ryan Moloney (Toadie), Eve Morey (Sonya), Ben Nicholas (Stingray Timmins), Jenna Rosenow (Amber)

EPISODE ONE

 

Director: Ric Forster, Louna Maroun

Writer: Ric Forster, Louna Maroun (story)

Stars: Stefan Dennis (Paul), Taylor Glockner (Mason Turner), Kevin Harrington (David Bishop), Aaron Jakubenko (Robbo Slade), Louna Maroun (Hope Gottlieb), Ryan Moloney (Toadie), Eve Morey (Sonya), Ben Nicholas (Stingray Timmins), Anthony Rentis (Robbo Double), Jessica Rosenow (Amber)

 

VIDEO CLIP

 

 

TRAILER

Annabelle

Summary: A couple begin to experience terrifying supernatural occurrences involving a vintage doll shortly after their home is invaded by satanic cultists.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 4th October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: John R. Leonetti

Screenwriter: Gary Dauberman

Cast: Tony Amendola (Father Perez), Ivar Brogger (Dr. Burgher), Keira Daniels (Young Annabelle Higgins), Ward Horton (John), Brian Howe (Pete Higgins), Eric Ladin (Detective Clarkin), Morganna May (Debbie), Kerry O’Malley (Sharon Higgins), Michelle Romano (Mary), Christopher Shaw (Fuller), Annabelle Wallis (Mia), Alfre Woodard (Evelyn)

Runtime: 99 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR ANNABELLE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s Annabelle review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #99 .

Stars(3)

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Annabelle review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3)

 

Nick Gardiner: You can check out Nick’s Annabelle review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #99

Stars(2)

 

David Griffiths:

While the world may be in awe of the anything that so-called horror master James Wan touches I’ve never really been bought over. Yes I will agree that the original Saw was a horror masterpiece but the franchise quickly fell away from there. Then there films like Dead Silence that were average to say the least and I wasn’t even won over by the Insidious franchise or The Conjuring so to be honest I wasn’t expecting much from Annabelle but I was pleasantly surprised as this is a film that goes back to some old school horror.

A prequel to The Conjuring, Annabelle follows a young married couple from the 1970s named Mia (Annabelle Wallis) and John (Ward Horton) preparing for the birth of their first child while John nears the end of his medical studies. There harmonic life is ruined though on one fateful night when their next door neighbours are murdered by their estranged daughter and her partner. After a violent confrontation with Police in Mia and John’s home one of Mia’s dolls becomes possessed.

As Mia and John try to get on with their lives the Annabelle doll makes life a living hell for them and puts their and the life of their daughter in grave danger. They soon turn to people such as Father Perez (Tony Amendola) and the mysterious Evelyn (Alfre Woodard) to try and help them out.

With Annabelle James Wan acts as producer and brings on board director John R. Leonetti on board to direct. Now Leonetti has an interesting career, he has mainly worked as a Director Of Photography on films as far ranged as The Mask, Honey, The Scorpian King and Detroit Rock City. As a director only Mortal Kombat: Annihilation and The Butterfly Effect 2 rate a mention but with Annabelle he shows that perhaps he should have been in the director’s chair on a number of other films over the years. Leonetti creates some true Alfred Hitchcock style shots including a brilliant ‘through-two-windows’ shot of the neighbour’s murder early on in the film.

Also aided by a serviceable screenplay Leonatti doesn’t allow himself to be sucked into delivering more Hollywood clichés and at times when as an audience you feel like you are going to know what happens next he has the sense to pull away from that and fool his audience. The result is an old school horror style film that relies more on thrills and suspense then what it does on cheap effects or loud noises… and in a sense that only adds to the creepiness even more.

Leads Annabelle Wallis and Ward Horton have been given the unusual order to produce a Pleasantville style of acting. It is obvious that they have been directed to mirror the acting styles of older films like Rosemary’s Baby and to their credit both pull it off well. Their move from squeaky clean All-American 1970s’ couple to couple in peril is smooth and almost seamless. Likewise Tony Amendola channels some of the actors who have played ‘creepy’ priests over the years but sadly Alfre Woodard isn’t given very much characterisation to work with and her character remains pretty much one dimensional.

Annabelle does everything that good old fashioned horror fans look for in a film. It sets up a rather evil nasty in a creative way, brings something new cinematically to the table and has just enough plot twists and turns without ever going over the top. Director, John R. Leonetti announces himself as a director with style in the horror genre and it’s good to see a filmmaker that is eager to move away from the Paranormal Activity style of filmmaking and instead turn to the old masters for guidance. Those who fear the doll element to the film will place it in the same realm as Child’s Play as this is a horror film that is much more sophisticated than that.

 

Stars(3.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Annabelle (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Annabelle′: For our full Annabelle review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #99 . You can also read Dave’s Annabelle review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Dracula Untold

Summary: Vampire mythology combined with the true history of Prince Vlad tell the origin of Dracula.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 4th October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Gary Shore

Screenwriter: Matt Sazama, Burk Sharpless, Bram Stoker (characters)

Cast: Joe Benjamin (Mihai), Mish Boyko (Andrei), Paul Bullion (Nicolae), Dominic Cooper (Mehmed), Charles Dance (Master Vampire), Luke Evans (Vlad), Sarah Gadon (Mirena), Jakob Gierszal (Acemi), Dilan Gwyn (Governess), William Houston (Cazan), Noah Huntley (Captain Petru), Paul Kaye (Brother Lucian), Ferdinand Kingsley (Hamza Bey), Thor Kristjansson (Bright Eyes), Joseph Long (General Omar), Zach McGowan (Shkelgim), Diarmaid Murtagh (Dimitru), Art Parkinson (Ingeras), Arkie Reece (General Ismail), Ronan Vibert (Simion)

Runtime: 92 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR DRACULA UNTOLD REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Dracula Untold review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(2.5)

 

Nick Gardiner: You can check out Nick’s Dracula Untold review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #99

Stars(2)

 

David Griffiths:

Somebody had to stand up and take the vampire genre back to the good old days. Call me cynical and old fashioned but as a seasoned fan of vampire flicks I was kind of getting tired of seeing my favourite beastie being portrayed by a pretty boy Englishman who sparkled in the sun while fawning over a frowny, sullen chick named Bella. Well the man who was up to the task of injecting a little bit of gore back into the genre is first time feature director Gary Shore who has somehow managed to find the right balance to make Dracula Untold a pretty good popcorn movie with just enough of a body count to keep the cult fans happy.

Dracula Untold takes vampire fans right back to the beginning, past Bram Stroker right back to the original myth of Transylvania’s favourite saviour, Vlad The Impaler (played here by Luke Evans). Vlad has brought peace to his homeland for a decade, but this is interrupted by the arrival of Turkish warlord Mehmed (Dominic Cooper) who once again demands that 1000 Transylvanian be turned over to his army, a fate that Vlad himself had been through as a child.

While Vlad tries to negotiate to continue the peace Mehmed makes it personal when he demands that Vlad and his wife, Mirena’s (Sarah Gadon) son Ingeras (Art Parkinson) be the 1001st child handed over. This results in Vlad eagerly trying to find a new source of power to overcome the Turks… a dark force that he has previously faced in the mountains.

There is little doubt that many people heading in to see Dracula Untold will be expecting something light and fluffy but instead Shore delivers up a film that sits someone in the realm of Forsaken: Desert Vampires and John Carpenter’s Vampires and that is certainly not a bad thing. There are a couple of easy to spot flaws in the plot but that is easily put to rest with some pretty impressive battle scenes and an air of suspense once you realise that this isn’t exactly a film that is afraid to bump off some of the main characters.

To the screenwriter’s credit they also go back to basics. There is no mucking around with fancy plotlines etc Dracula Untold is a simple story of good versus evil with a healthy subplot revolving around family versus duty for Government members. The screenwriter does take the film to the darker side though, the decision for Vlad to use evil against evil is an interesting take the hero myth and a welcome move away from the squeaky clean image that a lot of heroes seem to have these days. The biggest weakness for the script though is the film’s finale, the scene set in modern times, which I’m not sure actually has to be there unless the producers behind the film are setting it up to be another Hollywood franchise.

The darkness of the screenplay and plot is also brought to the fore by Gary Shore’s directional style. Some may criticise the dark style of the film, but for me it actually worked. Transylvania is in dark times and for a majority of the film the hero can only operate once the sun has gone down, hence filming in low light makes perfect sense and isn’t too much of a distraction for the audience. It’s actually a visual style not too dissimilar to the styles used in other medieval films like Season Of The Witch and Kingdom Of Heaven. As a first time feature director Shore actually handles the film pretty well and uses the countryside of his home, Ireland to good effect. As a result of how Dracula Untold turns out Shore is now a director that I am pretty keen to see what project he picks up next.

The big winner out of Dracula Untold is Luke Evans. Questions were raised when it was recently announced he would star in the reboot of The Crow despite proof he likes the Gothic feel with his work on The Raven and his blockbuster appeal due to The Hobbit franchise. Evans’ version of Vlad The Impaler is pretty much a screen test for The Crow. The dark brooding hero, fuelled by revenge, if he wanted to show his worth to his critics out there he couldn’t have picked a more perfect vehicle, the good news is he does a pretty decent job as well. While Evans shines though his co-stars are not given a hell of a lot to work with. Dominic Cooper plays a smarmy one-dimensional bad guy while Sarah Gadon could easily have done more if she was given more characterisation as well.

Dracula Untold is a fresh view of the original Dracula story. It is a fairly decent action film with a Gothic edge. Some of the popcorn brigade may be a little off put by the high body count and the few scenes of gore but in my book they are a definite plus. The great news is that Dracula Untold (much like Hercules earlier this year) isn’t the turkey that many expected and the vampires don’t sparkle.

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(2.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Dracula Untold (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Dracula Untold′: For our full Dracula Untold review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #99 . You can also read Dave’s Dracula Untold review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

The Babadook

Summary: “Do you want to die?” seven-year-old Samuel asks his stressed-out single mother, Amelia. She wonders if his question is a threat or a warning. After dealing with Samuel’s frantic tantrums his entire life, Amelia suspects that her son has begun directing his violent misbehavior toward her. However, after a dark and foreboding children’s book called Mister Babadook mysteriously appears on Samuel’s bookshelf, Amelia must decide if her son is truly deranged, or if there really is a bogeyman lurking in their darkened halls at night.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 22nd May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Jennifer Kent

Screenwriter: Jennifer Kent

Cast: Cathy Adamek (Prue), Craig Behenna (Warren), Essie Davis (Amelia), Daniel Henshall (Robbie), Chloe Hurn (Ruby), Hayley McElhinney (Claire), Jacqy Phillips (Beverly), Tim Purcell (The Babadook), Bridget Walters (Norma), Barbara West (Mrs. Roach), Benjamin Winspear (Oskar), Noah Wiseman (Samuel)

Runtime: 95 mins

Classification: M

OUR THE BABADOOK REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s The Babadook review on www.filmreviews,net.au

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

Australia has always been a country known for its cult horror. Whether it be the older Oz-ploitation films like Fair Game that inspired a young Quentin Tarantino or more modern films like Storm Warning, it seems Aussies know their horror. Need further proof? Well the filmmakers behind the original Saw series… also from the land down under. Now comes the latest Aussie horror flick, the low budget The Babdook and once again the Aussies have got it 100% right.

The flick follows hard working widow Amelia (Essie Davis – Burning Man, TV’S The Slap) who tries all she can do to be a good mother to her awkward son Samuel (Noah Wiseman – The Gift). However, things are not always easy for her and as her son’s behaviour seems to push more and more people away things become increasingly worse for them.

Things then turn even more serious when a children’s book mysteriously turns up in the house. After reading the book once to Samuel Amelia realises how dark and disturbing it is. However no matter how she tries to get rid of it the book keeps returning and even worse still is the fact that the horror it speaks about, Mr. Babadook (Tim Purcell – newcomer) now haunts their home in a potentially deadly manner.

Some people may look at the low budget of The Babadook and decide to give it a wide berth but doing so will mean they miss out on one of the best horror films to surface this year. This is a film that really announces Jennifer Kent as a director to watch. Kent has grown up living and breathing horror films her whole life and it certainly shows here. This is clearly the best ‘creepy kid’ horror since Let The Right One In and it blows most of the blockbuster horrors we’ve seen in recent years right out of the water.

Kent knows that it takes more than just a creepy soundtrack and some ‘bumps and screams’ on the audio track to really frighten an audience. Here she combines so good old fashioned psychological terror with one of the creepier characters we’ve seen in the horror genre over recent years. While his name might sound like something out of a Lewis Carroll adventure the Babadook himself is a pretty good horror nasty. The fact that he isn’t afraid to attack children or maim and torture a mother shows that he means business. He along with the suspense of not knowing if any of the characters in the film are suffering from mental means the audience is often on the edge of their or jumping out of them… the two things they should be doing during a horror film.

As a director Kent also gets the best of her cast. She puts both Essie Davis and Noah Wiseman through the ringer throughout this film. Davis has been a star-on-the-rise for awhile now and this really confirms that she is among the most talented actresses in Australia at the moment while Wiseman shows that he is a child actor with a big future ahead of him. For him to constantly deliver on the screen when he is playing a gruelling role and is on screen for nearly every minute of the film really shows just how talented he is.

If you are a horror fan then you won’t want to miss The Babadook. Once again an Australian filmmaker delivers a horror film that is destined to become a cult classic.
Stars(3.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  The Babadook (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Babadook′: For our full The Babadook review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Trailer: