Tagged: Adam Elliot

 

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show LogoThis week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘The Conjuring 2,’ ‘Donnie Darko (Re-release),’ ‘God Willing,’ ‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out Of The Shadows,’ Hello My Name Is Doris,’  and ‘A Perfect Day’. This episode also contains interviews with Patrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga, Drew Barrymore, Megan Fox, Stephen Amell, Adam Elliot (Adam Elliot Retrospective) and Gavin Bond (Todd Who?).

Also make sure you listen to this week’s episode to see how you can win a copy of  ’Stretch’ (starring Patrick Wilson, Ed Helms, James Badge Dale, Brooklyn Decker and Jessica Alba) thanks to our good friends at eOne Entertainment. Once you’ve heard the question on the show you can enter on our Facebook or Twitter pages.

And we have a bonus giveaway on this weeks’s episode. Make sure you listen to see how you can win a copy of  ’Blood Punch’  on DVD thanks to our good friends at Bounty Films…. but wait there’s more your DVD will be signed by the star of the film Milo Cawthorne. Once you’ve heard the question on the show you can enter on our Facebook or Twitter pages.

You can listen to The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show or download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

FeatureAdam Elliot

Cinema Nova is celebrating the career of Oscar winning Australian filmmaker Adam Elliot with his own retrospective this week so we decided it was time to sit down and have a chat with Adam. In this interview Adam talks about what made him interested in animation to begin with and what it has been like working with some of the most talented actors of this generation.

Adam Elliot Shorts Retrospective and live Q&A with Adam Elliot, hosted by Shaun Miller.  at Cinema Nova (Melbourne) Thursday 9 June 6.45pm. An atypical opportunity to see all of Adam’s short animated films on the big screen for one night only!

You can listen to or download our Adam Elliot interview right here.

Mary And Max

Summary: A tale of friendship between two unlikely pen pals: Mary, a lonely, eight-year-old girl living in the suburbs of Melbourne, and Max, a forty-four-year old, severely obese man living in New York.

Year: 2009

Australian Cinema Release Date: 9th April 2009

Australian DVD Release Date: October 2009

Country: Australia

Director: Adam Elliot

Screenwriter: Adam Elliot

Cast: Eric Bana (Damien (voice)), Toni Collette (Mary Daisy Dinkle (voice)), Renee Geyer (Vera (voice)), Philip Seymour Hoffman (Max Jerry Horovitz (voice)), Barry Humphries (Narrator (voice)), Michael Ienna (Lincoln (voice)), Ian ‘Molly’ Meldrum (Homeless Man (voice)), Bethany Whitmore (Young Mary (voice)),

Runtime: 92 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR MARY AND MAX REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Way back in 2004 Adam Elliot won an Oscar for his short-animation ‘Harvie Krumpet’, so it is scary at just how far the marvelous ‘Mary And Max’ will go. ‘Mary And Max’ is one of the finest animation films to ever surface and leaves the critically acclaimed ‘Persepolis’ for dead.

Young Mary Daisy Dinkle (voiced by Bethany Whitmore) is a lonely young girl that has no friends, parents who don’t pay her enough attention and a poo-coloured birthmark on her forehead that results in her constantly getting teased. While her mother shoplifts in a Post Office one day, Mary decides to flick through a New York phone book to find someone she can write to in a bid to discover whether ‘American babies come from the same place as Australian babies… out of a beer glass’. She chooses Max Jerry Horovitz (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a man who is just as depressed as her, but is constantly startled by the questions she asks. Over time they both get older. Adult Mary (Toni Collette) goes to uni, marries Damian (Eric Bana) while Max continues to suffer and realises that he suffers from Aspergers Syndrome and battles with his obesity

What Adam Elliot has managed to create here is an absolute masterpiece of a film. This is no Pixar animation, it delves into some very dark areas of human life but always manages to have a laugh at hand that will actually get audience members to chuckle. The story holds up so well that you can only imagine just how well this film will do overseas. It will become an absolute smash hit amongst European cinemagoers and may even be the film that attracts Australian film goers back to actually paying to see an Australian film.

Elliot is a visionary director and he manages to capture shots that would normally be impossible in animated films. The scenery and Elliot’s eye-for-detail leave the audience in awe and even those who would normally avoid animated films will see the true beauty in ‘Mary And Max’.

Some may be surprised at the caliber of actors that Elliot has managed to get involved with ‘Mary And Max’. Certainly you wouldn’t normally expect for someone like Philip Seymour Hoffman to voice a character in an Australian animated film but it’s not hard to see that Hoffman would have read this script and fell in love with it straight away. The story found here has produced one of the best scripts that an actor could ever have fall into their laps.

Films as brilliant as ‘Mary And Max’ don’t come along very often. If I had to grade it out of ten I would give it one hundred.

 

Stars(5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Mary and Max (2009) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Mary And Max reviews: This Mary And Max review first appeared in Buzz Magazine – October 2009.

Trailer: