Tagged: Alex Dimitriades

Ruben Guthrie

Summary: 

On the outside it looks like Ruben Guthrie (Patrick Brammall) has it all made. After just picking up another major Advertising Award he returns home to Sydney to have a house party to celebrate. But when his swimsuit model girlfriend Zoya (Abbey Lee) watches him once again take the regular trek of getting drunk before injuring himself while jumping off the roof of his mansion into a pool his life comes crashing down.

Horrified at the near miss Zoya sets him an ultimatum. She heads back overseas and tells him not to come and find her until he has gone twelve months sober. Ruben thinks it will be easy and while he is at first reluctant to join an Alcoholic Anonymous group he soon finds one that has him opening up as he gets closer to the very hippy-like Virginia (Harriet Dyer).

But while Ruben starts feeling really good he soon finds those around him disagree. Soon his parents Peter (Jack Thompson), Susan (Robyn Nevin) and his best friend Damian (Alex Dimitriades) are always trying to get him to drink, as is his boss (Jeremy Sims) who feels that his sobriety has taken away his edge.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 16th July 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Brendan Cowell

Screenwriter: Brendan Cowell

Cast: Natasha Beaumont (Sheridan), Blazey Best (Janelle), Patrick Brammall (Ruben Guthrie), Yvonne Cowell (Vonny), Alex Dimitriades (Damian), Harriet Dyer (Virginia), Leon Ford (Dimitri), Katie Gavin (Laura), Michael Lahoud (Jeremy), Abby Lee (Zoya), Francis Mossman (Lorenzo Oil), Robyn Neven (Susan), Elly Oh (Sun Ye), Jeremy Sims (Ray), Billy Thompson (Harry), Jack Thompson (Peter), Brenton Thwaites (Chet)

Runtime: 90 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR RUBEN GUTHRIE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

There is nothing quite as disappointing as a film that has so much potential but then fails at the last few hurdles – sadly that also the best way to describe new Australian film Ruben Guthrie. The film comes from a brilliant stable, based on a well received theatre play from one of Australia’s top writers and actors Brendan Cowell so therefore it is completely head scratching at why the film leaves itself open to so much criticism.

Having said that though Ruben Guthrie is not the complete mess that many critics would have you believe, misguided perhaps, but a mess… no way. To its credit Ruben Guthrie is nowhere near as bad as what its trailer makes it look and there are more than enough times throughout the film that it manages to win you over. There are some deeply touching scenes as the audience watches a man try to overcome his inner demons while his family and friends don’t seem to want to allow him to heal. Then there is also the fantastic soundtrack put together by Sarah Blasko that is so haunting it brings back flashes off the fantastic Somersault soundtrack from all those years ago.

But for every good thing about Ruben Guthrie something ugly raises its head. Stupid little questions like why does a raging alcoholic keep a well stocked bar going while he is trying to give up alcohol? They may seem small but they are the kinds of things that can really make a film like this seem less believable. Then there are the walking clichés. As if Jeremy Sims’ portrayal of an advertising executive isn’t cringe worthy enough then there is the over-the-top portrayal of a gay character, a shame when Alex Dimitriades has played such a realistic gay character in the amazing film Head On a few years ago. Sadly for Dimitriades here it is sad to take his character seriously because of the bad directing and screenwriting, it may have been supposed to make him look like a bully boy that the audience hated but the result is such a clichéd mincy character that most of the times the audience finds themselves laughing at him instead of hating him.

It seems such a shame that the film has problems like that when Cowell (who also directs here) manages to overcome the biggest problem of all – and that is to get the audience on side with Ruben Guthrie. At the start of this film he is a despicable character. He is a complete prick and you wonder how on Earth there will ever be a time when you find yourself barracking for him. But somehow Cowell manages to overcome that problem, and even when Ruben is starting a relationship with Virginia despite his promise to Zoya you can’t help but once again want to see him succeed. Yes this is a very schizophrenic script with its massive amount of ups and downs.

If nothing else Ruben Guthrie does set the path for young actor Patrick Brammall to really make a name for himself. The youngster has really crafted a way for himself with some great performances on television in shows like Glitch and Upper Middle Bogan etc, but here he manages to find just the right mix of dramatic and comedic acting to suggest that he may become the next Australian export overseas. Star-on-the-rise Brenton Thwaites is massively under-used however a newly found talent is discovered with Harriet Dyer who manages to steal the scene on a number of occasions. Aussie acting legends Jack Thompson and Robyn Nevin also just breeze through the roles providing a couple of laughs along the way.

Sadly Ruben Guthrie isn’t nearly as strong as it should have been. The screenplay raises too many questions for the audience to talk about once they leave the cinema and you really feel that the film doesn’t explore the notion of Australian culture and alcoholism to the full extent it should have been. Not a complete waste of time but could have been a lot better.

 

 

Stars(2.5)

 

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Ruben Guthrie review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

Stars(1)

 

 

 

Nick Gardener:

You can hear Nick’s full Ruben Guthrie review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138

 

Stars(2)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(2)

 

IMDB Rating: Ruben Guthrie (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Ruben Guthrie reviews: You can listen to our Ruben Guthrie review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138. You can also read our Ruben Guthrie review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt

Trailer:

The Infinite Man

Following the sellout Australian Premiere at the Melbourne International Film Festival, the inventive time travel comedy The Infinite Man is confirmed for a theatrical release in cinemas across Australia September 18 through Infinite Releasing. The international and local accolades keep coming for the film and its writer/director Hugh Sullivan, who just this weekend won the Best First Feature award at the Fantasia International Film Festival in Montreal, Canada.

Hedone Productions also today announced that The Infinite Man has sold to Invincible Pictures for distribution, including a theatrical release, in the US. Since the acclaimed world premiere at SXSW in March 2014, The Infinite Man has had selected US screenings, including on a Brooklyn rooftop for the New York Premiere, at California’s Newport Beach Film Festival and at the Las Vegas Film Festival. Also in North America it has screened at Canada’s Niagara Integrated Film Festival, where Hannah Marshall took out the Best Actress Award.

 Another two prestigious local premiere screenings have been confirmed ahead of the release. The Infinite Man has been selected to screen at WA’s Cinefest Oz as the Margaret River Premiere Film Event on Thursday 21 August and as the Opening Night Green Carpet Gala presentation of NSW’s Dungog Festival on Friday August 29.

 Starring Josh McConville (The Turning), Hannah Marshall and Alex Dimitriades, THE INFINITE MAN was a smash hit at the 2014 South by Southwest Film Festival, where it made the time.com list of ‘ten films that made SXSW spectacular this year’, alongside Grand Budapest Hotel and Chef and won the Indiewire Critic’s Pick for Best Screenplay and Best First Feature. 

 Australian media have also praised the debut feature from writer/director Hugh Sullivan, with The Music heralding it as ‘One of this century’s great local debuts’, The Age’s Craig Mathieson calling it ‘wonderfully inventive…a kind of deadpan scientific screwball that is delightful’, Luke Buckmaster for The Guardian billing it as one of the ten unmissable films at MIFF, ‘joyfully inventive…a rare find’ and Russell Edwards for SBS crowning it ‘one of the smartest Australian films ever made’.

 Infinite Releasing is an initiative of Jonathan Page (Executive Producer of The Babadook, Mary and Max, 100 Bloody Acres) and The Infinite Man producers Kate Croser (My Tehran for Sale, TV’s Danger 5) and Sandy Cameron. Jonathan Page said of the release announcement ‘We are delighted with the audience response to the film both at home and abroad and we are very excited to have the film confirmed for a release in cinemas nationally. The film generated a fantastic response at the MIFF Australian Premiere, and we are very pleased it has been selected for premiere and gala screenings at both Cinefest Oz and the Dungog Festival ahead of the release.’

*****Official selection 2014*****

SXSW South by Southwest (World Premiere)

Edinburgh International Film Festival (UK Premiere)

Melbourne International Film Festival (Australian Premiere)

Fantasia International Film Festival (Canadian Premiere)

Puchon International Fantastic Film Festival (Korean Premiere)

IN CINEMAS SEPTEMBER 18

CONFIRMED LOCATIONS:

VIC – Cinema Nova [Q&A event 4pm Sunday 14 September]

NSW – Dendy Newtown

WA – Cinema Paradiso

SA – Palace Nova Eastend

Don’t forget to check out Subculture’s interview with Hugh Sullivan.

Hannah Marshall

Australian actress Hannah Marshall (Packed to the Rafters) has won the Best Actress Award at the Inaugural Niagara Integrated Film Festival for her role in the time travel comedy feature film The Infinite Man. The film also screens tomorrow at the Edinburgh International Film Festival and will have its Australian Premiere at the 2014 Melbourne International Film Festival before releasing in Australian cinemas in September.

NIFF, founded by Bill Marshall (Founder and Chair Emeritus of the Toronto International Film Festival – TIFF), pairs premiere festival films with the premiere hospitality of the Niagara Wine Region. The festival screening, a special event with a paired three-course dinner and featuring local wines, was the Canadian Premiere of the film and Hannah was in attendance to accept the award. In a coup for Australia, the Best Actor award was won by Geoffrey Rush for his role in The Best Offer.

This is the fourth major North American screen of the film, following the recent New York premiere screening at Brooklyn’s rooftop cinema, a screening at the Newport Beach Film Festival and the World Premiere at South by Southwest earlier this year, which generated much critical acclaim, and saw the film make the time.com list of ‘ten films that made SXSW spectacular this year’, alongside Wes Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel, and Jon Favreau’s Chef.

Hannah Marshall is best known for her role as Loretta Schembri in Packed to the Rafters, for which she received a Logie nomination for Most Popular New Female Talent (2011).

Starring Josh McConville (The Turning), Hannah Marshall and Alex Dimitriades, The Infinite Man is a time travel comedy-romance about Dean (Josh McConville), a man whose attempts to construct the perfect romantic weekend backfire when he traps his lover Lana (Hannah Marshall) in an infinite loop.

The Infinite Man is the feature film debut for writer/director Hugh Sullivan and is produced by Kate Croser (Danger 5, My Tehran for Sale) and Sandy Cameron, executive produced by Jonathan Page and Cameron Rogers. DOP is Marden Dean (Fell).

The Infinite Man was produced by Hedone Productions in association with Bonsai Films, with investment from the South Australia Film Corporation (SAFC) through their FilmLab funding initiative, and development assistance from Screen Australia.

FilmLab is a $4.2million development initiative of the South Australian Film Corporation (SAFC), funded by the South Australian government. Designed to develop filmmakers who have a track record in short form to take the next step into long form film production, the initiative was also built to find unique new voices in Australian cinema.

 

The Infinite Man will be released in Australian cinemas in September 2014 by Infinite Releasing with international sales handled by Shoreline Entertainment.

The Infinite Man

The World Premiere of time travel comedy The Infinite Man has generated an overwhelmingly positive response at the SXSW Film Festival and is the only Australian film to make the time.com list of ‘ten films that made SXSW spectacular this year’, alongside Wes Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel, and Jon Favreau’s Chef. Moviefone today ranked it as the second best film at the fest behind Richard Linklater’s Boyhood. Both Screen Daily and The Hollywood Reporter supported the idea of international distribution, while Indiewire and The Playlist likened it to the time travel greats, with The Playlist rating it as an overall festival highlight.

Starring Josh McConville (The Turning), Hannah Marshall and Alex Dimitriades, The Infinite Man is a time travel comedy-romance about Dean (Josh McConville), a man whose attempts to construct the perfect romantic weekend backfire when he traps his lover Lana (Hannah Marshall) in an infinite loop.

Producers Kate Croser (Danger 5, My Tehran for Sale) and Sandy Cameron have just returned from the festival, which they attended with writer director Hugh Sullivan, lead actress Hannah Marshall, EP Cam Rogers, DOP Marden Dean, and composer/sound designer Jed Palmer. They said of the experience of the past week: “We knew the SXSW film festival was the ideal place to launch The Infinite Man because of its reputation for unearthing breakout indie films, but after three sold out screenings we’ve been really overwhelmed by how enthusiastically the US audiences and critics have embraced the film and we’re looking forward to bringing it home to Australian audiences later in the year.”

Screen Daily’s glowing review called it ‘fresh, intriguing and always watchable’ and endorsed international distribution, ‘The time travel film may well be a well-worn movie genre, but Australian film The Infinite Man takes it off in all new directions as an oddball inventor uses his device to try and craft the perfect moment for he and his girlfriend. An elegantly filmed three-hander, it is a smart, funny and oddly romantic indie film that deserves to find international distribution as well as further festival exposure.

The Hollywood Reporter was equally as enthusiastic ‘”Smart Aussie comedy…The metaphoric possibilities of time-travel fantasies are unusually well exploited in The Infinite Man… the Aussie import would be easy to market in arthouses despite the absence of familiar faces on- or off-screen.”

Moviefone rated it as ‘the most quietly devastating and imaginatively inventive movie at the festival… all around jaw-dropping’. Leading indie film website Twitch dubbed it ‘‘Indie time travel mayhem at its best…the kind of movie you are going to want to watch time and time again. And time again… And time again...’.

Indiewire called it ‘An exemplary time travel comedy’ and ‘an impressively minimalist storytelling acheivement’, placing it in the company of classics of the genre: ‘Time travel mix-ups have provided ample fodder for a range of comedic material, from Back to the Future to Safety Not Guaranteed. The Australian romcom The Infinite Man is part of a rare breed that uses the constant pileup of future and past events to enhance its humor and intelligence at once.’

The Playlist said it, ‘might have been the best thing we saw all week. … an uncanny comedy that mixes the metaphysics of Groundhog Day with the emotionality of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and a splash of the tech-y nerdiness of Primer. Comparing this film to those classics is kind of like carrying around a loaded gun, but it’s apt just the same’. Further praise went to director Hugh Sullivan for his debut feature “Every so often you see a movie at one of these festivals that seems to announce (loudly) a true filmmaking talent, one that should be watched closely in the years to come; “The Infinite Man” is one of those movies…a wildly creative, thrilling, unforgettable, heartbreaking work of a singular, visionary filmmaker. “The Infinite Man” is infinitely brilliant.”

The Infinite Man was produced by Hedone Productions in association with Bonsai Films, with investment from the South Australia Film Corporation (SAFC) through their FilmLab funding initiative, and development assistance from Screen Australia.

FilmLab is a $4.2million development initiative of the South Australian Film Corporation (SAFC), funded by the South Australian government. Designed to develop filmmakers who have a track record in short form to take the next step into long form film production, the initiative was also built to find unique new voices in Australian cinema.

 

The Infinite Man will be released in Australian cinemas in 2014 by Infinite Releasing with international sales handled by Shoreline Entertainment.

Alex Dimitriades

It is with Texas-sized pleasure that Hedone Productions announces today that the World Premiere of Australian feature film The Infinite Man has been confirmed for the prestigious South by Southwest (SXSW) festival in the US in March. The Infinite Man is the only Australian film selected to screen in the ‘Visions’ section of the festival, which presents audacious, risk-taking artists in the new cinema landscape that demonstrate raw innovation and creativity in narrative filmmaking.

2014 marks the 20th year of SXSW Film, which has grown rapidly in recent years, with Variety observing that ‘the industry will look back at 2013 as a game-changer for SXSW’. Encompassing music and interactive technologies as well as film, the festival is uniquely positioned as a creative hub like no other, with the Sydney Morning Herald last week nominating SXSW as one of the ten festivals to change your life. SXSW Film takes place in Austin, Texas from 7 – 15 March.

The trailer has been released today and can be previewed online at: https://vimeo.com/83463530

The anticipated feature debut from director Hugh Sullivan, starring Josh McConville, Hannah Marshall and Alex Dimitriades, The Infinite Man is a time travel comedy-romance about Dean (Josh McConville), a man whose attempts to construct the perfect romantic weekend backfire when he traps his lover Lana (Hannah Marshall) in an infinite loop.

 “We are thrilled to premiere The Infinite Man at the SXSW Film Festival, given its reputation as one of the best launching pads for indie films like ours. Recent SXSW premieres include Lena Dunham’s Tiny Furniture, Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers and Duncan Jones’ Source Code and we couldn’t be happier to be in that company”, said Kate Croser, Producer.

 The Infinite Man is the anticipated feature film debut of writer/director Hugh Sullivan whose short films have screened in official selection at the Palm Springs International Shortfest, Flickerfest and the Melbourne International Film Festival. As a winner of the Spirit of Youth Award – Moving Pictures in 2006, Hugh received a one-year mentorship with director Phillip Noyce.

 The Infinite Man stars acclaimed actor Josh McConville (Underbelly, Wild Boys, Redfern Now) in his first feature film lead role as the gifted scientist and control freak Dean. Widely regarded for his work on the stage, Josh was crowned Best Actor at the Sydney Theatre Awards in 2013 for his role in Griffin Theatre’s The Boys. Josh’s feature film debut came in 2013 in David Wenham’s directorial debut Commission from the celebrated anthology film The Turning, in which he starred starring alongside Hugo Weaving.

Hannah Marshall, who stars as Dean’s girlfriend Lana, is best known for her role as Loretta Schembri in Packed to the Rafters, one of the highest rating shows on Australian television, for which received a Logie nomination for Most Popular New Female Talent (2011). AACTA award winner Alex Dimitriades (The Slap, Head On) stars as Lana’s ex-boyfriend, the disgraced 1980s Olympian, Terry.

 The film is produced by Hedone Productions’ Kate Croser (Danger 5, 100 Bloody Acres) and Sandy Cameron. Croser also produced My Tehran For Sale, which was filmed in Tehran and went on to screen in Official Selection at Toronto, Vancouver, Busan and Rotterdam International Film Festivals and won the IF Independent Spirit Award (2009). Cameron Rogers and Jonathan Page (Mary and Max, The Babadook) are Executive Producers.

 The Infinite Man was produced by Hedone Productions in association with Bonsai Films, with investment from the South Australia Film Corporation (SAFC) through their FilmLab funding initiative, and development assistance from Screen Australia.

 FilmLab is a $4.2million development initiative of the South Australian Film Corporation (SAFC), funded by the South Australian government. Designed to develop filmmakers who have a track record in short form to take the next step into long form film production, the initiative was also built to find unique new voices in Australian cinema.

The Infinite Man will be released in Australian cinemas in 2014 by Infinite Releasing with international sales handled by Shoreline Entertainment.