Tagged: Ben Foster

Inferno

Summary: When Robert Langdon wakes up in an Italian hospital with amnesia, he teams up with Dr. Sienna Brooks, and together they must race across Europe against the clock to foil a deadly global plot.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 13th October 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: 18th January, 2017

Country: United States, Japan, Turkey, Hungry

Director: Ron Howard

Screenwriter: David Koepp, Dan Brown (novel)

Cast: Cesare Cremonini (Ignazio Busoni), Ida Darvish (Marta), Jon Donahue (Richard Savage), Mehmet Ergen (Mirsat), Ben Foster (Bertrand Zorbist), Tom Hanks (Robert Langdon), Felicity Jones (Dr. Sienna Brooks), Irrfan Khan (Harry Sims ‘The Provost’), Sidse Babett Knudsen (Dr. Elizabeth Sinskey), Xavier Laurent (Antoine), Fausto Maria Sciarappa (Parker), Paolo Antonio Simioni (Dr. Marconi), Omar Sy (Christoph Bruder), Ana Ularu (Vayentha)

Runtime: 121 mins

Classification: M

OUR INFERNO REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Inferno sees the arrival of yet another attempted franchise reboot in 2016. We’ve seen Ghostbusters and Bridget Jones’s Baby arrive with mixed success now we find Academy Award winning director Ron Howard (A Beautiful Mind) rebooting the Robert Langdon franchise some seven years after its last instalment.

Based on the novel by Dan Brown Inferno begins with Robert Langdon (Tom HanksForrest Gump) waking up in a hospital with no memory of how he got there and being hunted by a assassin (Ana UlaruSerena). After managing to escape with Dr. Sienna Brooks (Felicity JonesThe Amazing Spider-Man) Langdon starts putting together the pieces and realises that he must try and stop an apocalyptic event set by Bertrand Zorbist (Ben FosterWarcraft: The Beginning) who believes his actions will actually save the world.

But as Langdon tries to overcome memory loss and put the pieces together to solve the mystery things are made even more difficult by him when he realises he doesn’t know which World Health Organisation agent he can trust, Dr. Elizabeth Sinskey (Sidse Babett KnudsenWestworld) or Christoph Bruder (Omar SyJurassic World). To add to their confusion the audience also learns there is a puppet-master in the wings in the form of Harry Sims (Irrfan KhanLife Of Pi).

While watching Inferno you do start to realise that this is going to be a film that divides its audience. For the regular popcorn set this is going to be a film that delivers a fairly decent, if not at times confusing, crime thriller plot that shows you just as many European landmarks as a Bond film. For the more seasoned film goer though this is a film that reveals some of the laziest filmmaking Ron Howard will deliver during his career with a clichéd plot that just follows the same sequence over and over – Langdon arrives in a city, goes to find the puzzle piece, is chased by Police and uses an ancient tunnel to escape and then moves on to the next city. There is also a level of inconsistence around the character of Robert Langdon that surfaces right throughout this film and despite the work of screenwriter, David Koepp (Jurassic Park), to pass it off as part of Langdon’s amnesia it simply doesn’t work.

Rather than being a gritty thriller Inferno becomes more of a fun ride as the audience gets to see European city of European city while there is a mid-level of suspense and you try in your mind to put the pieces together at the same time as Langdon does… although that it made a hell of a lot easier if you are up to date on your Dante. The big tip for the audience is to not let to get too bogged down in the ‘historical’ parts of this film or you will be scratching your head and hurling popcorn as you struggle to work out what the hell is going on.

Likewise this is a movie that Tom Hanks just seems to breeze through. While Sully recent saw Hanks once again reveal his wonderful character acting skills here Hanks wears the character of Robert Langdon like an old slipper, it’s a role that he is obviously comfortable in but doesn’t deliver the acting heights that we know he is capable of. The same can be said for Felicity Jones who isn’t given a huge amount to work with and even disappears for a quarter of the film. The big winner in the acting stakes is Sidse Babett Knudsen who makes good use of the screen time she is given. Omar Sy and Irrfan Khan are also wasted in their roles, the latter being given a role very similar to a poor man’s Bond villain as he plays a character that leaves the audience asking… is that even a profession?

The best way to enjoy Inferno is to just go into the cinema expecting a fun film. While it isn’t exactly a borefest it certainly lacks the suspense of Angels & Demons and is a lot more clichéd than the Da Vinci Code. Did the Robert Langdon franchise need Inferno? Probably not!

Stars(2.5)

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(2.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Inferno (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Inferno Reviews: You can also listen to our Inferno reviews on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #196. Dave Griffiths also delivered his Inferno review on the 12/10/2016 episode of Living Fresh with IGA with Ed Phillips on 2UE.

Trailer:

The Finest Hours

Summary: It should be one of the happiest days of Bernie Webber’s (Chris Pine) life. Becoming engaged to his girlfriend, the beautiful Miriam (Holliday Grainger), Bernie’s aim is to go to work at the Coast Guard station where he is stationed and go through the ritual of asking his boss, Daniel Cluff (Eric Bana), if he can get married.

As fate would have it though one of the worst storms to ever hit the United States strikes on that very day. Offshore two oil tankers split in half and while the Coast Guard rushes to save the crew of one they have no idea that another is in difficultly until the alarm is raised much later. As Ray Sybert (Casey  Affleck) battles to keep his crew alive Bernie finds himself being sent on a mission to rescue them, with a crew of his own –a crew that doesn’t trust him as his last rescue ended in the loss of life.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 3rd March 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Craig Gillespie

Screenwriter: Eric Johnson, Scott Silver, Paul Tamasy, Casey Sherman (book), Michael J. Tougias (book)

Cast: Casey Affleck (Ray Sybert), Savannah Rae Allen (Eliza), Eric Bana (Daniel Cluff),Abraham Benrubi (George ‘Tiny’ Myers),  Rachel Brosnahan (Bea Hansen), Danny Connelly (Dave Ryder), Alexander Cook (John Stello), Ben Foster (Richard Livesey), Jesse Gabbard (Domingo Garcia), Kyle Gallner (Andy Fitzgerald), Holliday Grainger (Miriam Webber), Beau Knapp (Mel Gouthro), Benjamin Koldyke (Donald Bangs), Keiynan Lonsdale (Eldon Hanan), John Magaro (Ervin Maske), Matthew Maher (Carl Nickerson), Graham McTavish (Frank Fauteux), John Ortiz (Wallace Quiery), Chris Pine (Bernie Webber), Michael Raymond-James (D.A. Brown), Angela Hope Smith (Catherine Paine), Josh Stewart (Tchuda Southerland)

Runtime: 117 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR THE FINEST HOURS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Sometimes when a film is released you just have to shake your head at what the distributors think they are doing with the film. Disney’s choice to release The Finest Hours in Australia with no media screenings and only in limited cinemas is a baffling one. Traditionally, disaster films always do well in Australia and not only that The Finest Hours is certainly not the kind of film that should be kept away from the film loving public as it is a film that has a lot going for it.

So often when a director and screenwriter team together to make a disaster film they fall into a familiar trap of trying to make the audience like the characters so much they pile a heap of back story into the film and the result is the disaster itself starting way too late into the film. That certainly isn’t a trap that Craig Gillespie and his team of screenwriters fall in to. Gillespie as a director is someone that certainly can’t be peg holed into a style of filmmaking. From the thought provoking Lars & The Real Girl through to the horror frights of Fright Night Gillespie seems to just make whatever film he damn well feels like and here with The Finest Hours he shows why he is a director that should be added to your list of ‘exciting directors in modern day filmmaking.’ He doesn’t muck around with tons of back story with The Finest Hours, instead the storm itself hits within the first half hour of the film, which means that Affleck and co and in peril before the ice in your Coke has even started to melt.

Surprisingly The Finest Hours also manages to raise the stakes on a number of levels. Not only are the crew of the oil tanker in great peril but Gillespie also makes in known in no uncertain terms that Bernie is being sent on a mission that he has badly unprepared for with a boss that has no clue what he is doing… he is being sent to certain death. Just to raise the stakes even more Gillespie then has the events happen not only through the eyes of Bernie and Ray but also from the perspective of Miriam, an innocent bystander who is forced to watch as the man she loves is being sent on an impossible mission.

It’s for that reason that The Finest Hours is a must see for those people that love good cinema. The suspense never lets up and Gillsepie masterfully directs intense scenes which sees Bernie’s small Coast Guard boat become a submarine as it plunges through the waves in front of it and the even more suspenseful scene during which Ray’s crew have to face the hard decision of whether or not to jump into the wild sea that has just claimed their tanker.

The team of screenwriters also have done enough with the screenplay to make the key characters here likable. You instantly care what happens to the likes of Bernie and Ray, while they even steer well clear of making Mirian a whiny character, something that you feel a lesser team may have accidentally found themselves doing. The screenplay and Gillespie’s directional style also allows the cast to have a little bit of free reign as well. A look between Chris Pine and Ben Foster as their characters race towards the wild sea says more than one ten pages of script ever could. Likewise watching Casey Affleck sit in the corner and calmly think while the rest of his ‘crew’ panic says more about his character than any back story ever could. While both of done some great work in films over the years The Finest Hour is the one film that really shows that Affleck and Pine are so much more than what we have seen from them in the past.

Through no fault of its own The Finest Hours is one of those films that is going to be overlooked by a lot of film goers simply because of the fact that it hasn’t been promoted properly. That’s sad when you realise that in a lot of ways this is a far superior film to something like The Perfect Storm… yes Craig Gillespie has somehow managed to create a classy disaster flick that demands a viewing by serious film lovers.

Stars(4)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating: The Finest Hours (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment The Finest Hours reviews: You can listen to our full The Finest Hours  review on a The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #168.

Trailer:

Ain't Them Bodies Saints

Summary: Outlaw couple Bob Muldoon (Casey Affleck) and Ruth Guthrie (Rooney Mara) find their crime spree at an abrupt end when they surrender after wounding a cop (Ben Foster) in a shootout. Four years later Bob escapes from prison in search of Ruth and their daughter, Sylvie, born after their arrest. Along the way, his past starts to catch up with him. Set in Texas in the early 1970s and opening at the place where most outlaw films end, Ain’t Them Bodies Saint is a lyrical and moody film about longing and absence

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 19th March, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: David Lowery

Screenwriter: David Lowery

Cast: Casey Affleck (Bob Muldoon), Kentucker Audley (Freddy), Charles Baker (Bear), Will Beinbrink (Lt. Townes), Keith Carrdine (Skerritt), Steve Corder (Lt. Boone), Steve Corner (Lt. Brule), Ben Foster (Patrick Wheeler), Augustine Frizzell (Sissy), Annalee Jeffries (Mary), Rami Malek (Will), Rooney Mara (Ruth Guthrie), Frank Mosley (Lt. Carson), Nate Parker (Sweetie), Turner Ross (T.C.), Jacklynn Smith (Sylvie Guthrie), Kennadie Smith (Sylvie Guthrie), Eric Steele (Miles), Artist Thornton (Altman), Gwen Waymon (Margaret), David Zellner (Zellner)

Runtime: 96 mins

Classification:M

OUR AIN’T THEM BODIES SAINTS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Ain’t The Bodies Saints’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #58

Nick Gardner: Stars(3)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Ain’t The Bodies Saints’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #58

 

David Griffiths:

It seems a lot of reviews for “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” have been likening the film to the work of director Terrence Malick. That in a sense is a slap-in-the-face for “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” as Malick’s recent efforts, “To The Wonder” and “The Tree Of Life” have been boring affairs that have the potential to lapse their audiences into a coma. “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” may at times be a slow watch but its screenplay and acting certainly lifts it higher than anything Malick has been doing recently. In fact “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” could well be one of the better films this year.

Written and directed by David Lowery (“St. Nick,” “Deadroom”) “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” is set in Texas around 1970 and begins with lovers Ruth Guthrie (Rooney Mara – “Her,” “Side Effects”) and Bob Muldoon (Casey Affleck – “Out Of The Furnace,” “ParaNorman”) involved in a robbery and subsequent pursuit with police. After becoming holed up in an old farmhouse during the resulting shootout the pregnant Ruth shoots and wounds local police officer Patrick Wheeler (Ben Foster – “Lone Survivor,” “Kill Your Darlings”).

After he takes the blame for the shooting Bob is jailed for life. While in prison he writes to Ruth and their daughter every day and he annually tries to break-out of prison. On one attempt he succeeds and soon he is making his way across America to Ruth. While friends such as Sweetie (Nate Parker – “Red Hook Summer,” “Arbitrage”) are quick to help him he also has enemies wanting him dead and Police Officers desperate to catch him. Then of course there is the fact that Ruth is now fairly close to Patrick.

The work that Lowery delivers with “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” is impressive. As a director he has mostly worked on short films so for him to produce a film of the caliber of this is a complete surprise. The film looks brilliant. Yes, Lowery has learnt so much of Malick’s filmmaking techniques on how to make a film look good, but he also has the knack for creating a good script which certainly helps it out there.

At times the film is slow, but that doesn’t mean that it drags. Lowery doesn’t muck around with spelling everything out for the audience nor does he waste a lot of time on back story, he just puts on screen what people need to know. The script will see audience members react in different ways – some will feel sorry for Bob, others will find themselves wanting to see Patrick and Ruth together. Whichever journey you decide to take though will be a pleasurable one as Lowery has created a gem of a film.

Lowery also takes some chances with the casting. Rooney Mara hasn’t always been as impressive as she was in “The Social Network.” She was well and truly below par in “Side Effects” while the studio set her up for a fall in the remake of “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo” but her Mara silences her critics and shows that she certainly is a star on the rise. Her performance here is similar to the one that Michelle Williams so brilliantly delivered in “Wendy And Lucy.”

The other casting chances are with Ben Foster and Casey Affleck. Neither are really the kind of actor that you immediately think of being able to play the romantic lead but both step up well. Foster is extremely likable as Patrick Wheeler and it’s not hard to see why audience members will warm to him. Meanwhile Casey Affleck captures the same acting magic he did with his work on “The Killer Inside” and delivers another powerful performance.

“Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” is a brilliant piece of American cinema that really announces David Lowery as a director to watch. It looks stunning visually and has enough suspense to keep its audience interested throughout.

 Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:  Ain't Them Bodies Saints (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Ain’t Them Bodies Saints′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #58.  You can also read Dave’s review of Ain’t Them Bodies Saints on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

 

Lone Survivor

Summary: Marcus Luttrell and his team set out on a mission to capture/kill al Qaeda leader Ahmad Shahd in late June 2005. The team are left to fight for their lives in one of the most valiant efforts of modern warfare.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 20th February, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Peter Berg

Screenwriter: Peter Berg, Marcus Luttrell (book), Patrick Robinson (book)

Cast: Yousuf Azami (Shah), Eric Bana (Erik Kristensen), Johnny Bautista (Lt. Edwards), Dan Bilzerian (Healy), Kurt Carlson (Captain Lovas), Paul Craig (‘EOD’ Paul),  Jerry Ferrara (Hasselert), Ben Foster (Matt ‘Axe’ Axelson), Daniel Fulcoly (Lt. Andrews), Michael P. Herrman (Wallace), Emile Hirsch (Danny Dietz), Joh Hocker (Hocker), Taylor Kitsch (Michael Murphy), Robert Loerke (Captain Jacoby), Alexander Ludwig (Shane Patton), Zabiullah Mirzai (Zabi), Henry Penzi (Penzi), Sammy Sheik (Taraq), Ali Suliman (Gulab), Rich Ting (James Suh), Mark Wahlberg (Marcus Luttrell)

Runtime: 121 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR LONE SURVIVOR REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(3)

Please check Adam’s Lone Survivor review of that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #68

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s Lone Survivor review of that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

David Griffiths:

War films are a dime-a-dozen… bad war films are even more common. It’s for that reason that is okay to be a little nervous when approaching Lone Survivor. Even the fact that it has a known actor like Mark Wahlberg in it doesn’t make necessarily a good film either… after all the man formerly known as Marky Mark has delivered some pretty bad turds over the years. Then there is the Peter Berg factor, yes Berg has shown over the years that he can create some masterpieces, just as he did with Friday Night Lights, but then he was also the man responsible for Battleship.

Luckily for movie fans out there Lone Survivor falls into the realm of good war films. So good in fact that it deserves to be mentioned alongside films such as The Hurt Locker and Black Hawk Down. Yes Peter Berg served his time with the studio and worked on Battleship and has now once again been allowed to show the world what a fine filmmaker he really is.

The film itself is based on actual events that happened to Marcus Luttrell (Mark Wahlberg) during a daring raid in Afghanistan to capture notorious Taliban leader Ahmed Shah (Yousuf Azami). Soon Luttrell’s group, which also contains Michael Murphy (Taylor Kitsch) and Matt Axelson (Ben Foster) find themselves deep under enemy fire after having to make a huge moral call. Worse still is the fact that they are cut off by their leader, Erik Kristensen (Eric Bana) as their communications have all gone down.

There is little doubt that this is film is made ten times better under the direction of Peter Berg. Just like he did with Friday Night Lights Berg makes Lone Survivor feel like you are watching a documentary. The dialogue was his script his natural and just because he has a big name like Eric Bana in a role doesn’t mean that Berg decides to give his A-lister any extra on screen.

Likewise Berg doesn’t hold back on the violence in this film. The film is set on the battlefield and it is obvious that Berg not only wants his audience to see that the men involved in this mission were not only heroes but he also wants people to realise just how tough it is for men and women on the front line. Not only does he show this with some very confronting war violence but also by some extremely intense scenes that show the moral decisions that soldiers have to make while going about their jobs.

In fact the highlight of Lone Survivor is the scene where Luttrell and co are faced with a very big ethical dilemma. Do they shoot dead some unarmed young Afghanis or do what the law says and let them go, knowing full well that the latter option is likely to bring even more repercussions for the soldiers. As the soldiers discuss what is best to do Berg heightens the tension to a level that most filmmakers can only dream about achieving.

Lone Survivor really isn’t a film about the actors in it, which is made obvious by the fact that an actor of the calibre of Eric Bana is in a pretty much ‘blink and you’ll miss him’ role while the likes of Ben Foster and Emile Hirsch are also in restricted roles. To his credit Mark Wahlberg delivers even when some of the scenes seem to be above his usual acting talent, while Taylor Kitsch again silences his critics with a worthy performance as well.

This is one film that is certainly a gripping, yet also very tough watch. The violence is unrelenting but Peter Berg does what he sets out to do and that is show the audience just how brave the men involved in this raid were. Lone Survivor is one of the finest war movies you will ever see.

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:  Lone Survivor (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Lone Survivor′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #68 for our full Lone Survivor review.

Trailer:

Kill Your Darlings

Summary:The year is 1944. Ginsberg (Radcliffe) is a young student at Columbia University when he falls hopelessly under the spell of charismatic classmate Carr (Dane DeHaan). Alongside Carr, Ginsberg manages to strike up friendships with aspiring writers William Burroughs (Ben Foster) and Jack Kerouac (Jack Huston) that would cast conformity to the wind, and serve as the foundation of the Beat movement. Meanwhile, an older outsider named David Krammerer falls deeply and madly in love with the impossibly cool Carr. Later, when Krammerer dies under mysterious circumstances, police arrest Kerouac, Burroughs, and Carr as potential suspects, paving the way for an investigation that would have a major impact on the lives of the three emerging artists.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 12th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: John Krokidas

Screenwriter: Austin Bunn, John Krokidas

Cast: Zach Appelman (Luke Detiweler), Michael Cavadias (Ray Conklin), David Cross (Louis Ginsberg), John Cullum (Professor Stevens), Erin Darke (Gwendolyn), Dane DeHaan (Lucien Carr), Jon DeVries (Mr. Burroughs), Ben Foster (William Burroughs), Michael C. Hall (David Kammerer), Jack Huston (Jack Kerouac), Jennifer Jason Leigh (Naomi Ginsberg), Leslie Meisel (Edith Cohen), Elizabeth Olsen (Edie Parker), Daniel Radcliffe (Allen Ginsberg), David Rasche (Dean), Kyra Sedgwick (Marian Carr), Kevyn Settle (Norman), Nicole Signore (Page)

Runtime: 103 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR KILL YOUR DARLINGS REVIEWS & RATINGS

David Griffiths: 

There comes a time in each teenage film star’s career when they need to breakout of that mould and reveal themselves as an actor who can not only prove themselves as an adult actor but also somebody who is good enough to keep finding work for the next 30 to 50 years in the industry. Now is that time for Daniel Radcliffe who of course started his career as the boy wizard himself Harry Potter.

Now Harry’s put his wand back in the cupboard Radcliffe needs to show that he can play other characters and to the young stars’ credit he has tackled some ambitious projects. Firstly there was the stage nudity as he took the lead role in the theatre production of “Equus” and then he delved into Gothic Horror with “The Woman In Black.” Now in his latest feature film role Radcliffe finds himself entwined in a tale of homosexuality and murder as he portrays one of America’s greatest literature figures in “Kill Your Darlings.”

Radcliffe plays poet Allen Ginsberg at a time in his life when his famous father Louis Ginsberg (David Cross) watches as his son goes off to college at Columbia and his mother Naomi (Jennifer Jason Leigh) is admitted into a mental institution.

Allen’s arrival at Columbia opens his eyes up to a new world of literature, the forbidden fruit of people such as Harry Miller. He finds himself fascinated and intrigued by fellow student Lucien Carr (Dane DeHaan) whose charm, wit and boyish good looks makes him the kind of person that anyone will do anything for… something that ultimately brings about his downfall.

Soon Allen finds himself joining Lucien’s call for destroying the popular literature of the day and replacing it with the risqué and throwing all literature rules out the window. Together they team up with Jack Kerouac (Jack Huston) and William Burroughs (Ben Foster) to begin the revolution. But soon the band of talented young writers find themselves involved in a murder that threatens to end their promising careers before they have even started.

As a film “Kill Your Darlings” delivers a story of intrigue that certainly draws in its audience but you are left feeling like director John Krokidas (who is a first time feature film director) needed to push this film a little further. It’s a gritty and dirty story but Krokidas seems to just skirt around the edges. Sure there is heavy drug use and Radcliffe partakes in several scenes of homosexual passion and sex but the storyline at hand here really called for Krokidas to push the envelope a little further. The full answers about Lucien and David’s (Michael C. Hall) relationship seems cloudy. Was Lucien just a gifted player who knew how to get what he wanted or was David the sexual predator that Lucien and his mother suggested he was. Then of course there’s the other big question that gets thrown up but never really answered, why did Allen tell David where Lucien was when he knew the young boy was trying to escape him. The fact that these questions are never answered ends up with “Kill Your Darlings” becoming a good-rather-than-great film.

The power of this film though lays in the characterisation and the way those characters are portrayed by the actors involved. Radcliffe portrays the naive and often confused Ginsberg quite well. Archival footage shows that Radcliffe captured a lot of Ginsberg’s awkward facial expressions extremely well and the young actor can certainly hold his head up high as he does more than enough to suggest that he has a lengthy career ahead of him. As previously mentioned Radcliffe does deliver some risqué scenes but just imagine what could have been if Krokidas had decided to take this film a little further.

Krokidas has also surrounded Radcliffe with some fine acting talent. Jack Huston delivers a strong performance as he shows Jack Kerouac in a very different light to the way he was portrayed in “On The Road” while Ben Foster is haunting and virtually unrecognisable as he delves deeply into some character acting while he plays William Burroughs.

The standout actor here though is Dane DeHaan whose roles in films such as “Lawless,” “Chronicle” and “Metallica’s Through The Never” have been promising, but here he delivers. DeHaan seems to call on the skills of a young Leonardo DiCaprio as he shines in a role that will certainly be deemed his breakout role in the years to come. His performance is strong throughout and he often steals scenes away from his much more experienced co-stars.

Like “Howl” and “On The Road” before it “Kill Your Darlings” is an interesting insight to the tragic and somewhat strange lives of some of America’s most famous literacy giants, and while the film is a great watch it will always be a film that leaves you wondering what could have been if the director had the courage to go that little bit further.

Stars(3.5)

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Kill Your Darlings’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Kill Your Darlings (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Kill Your Darlings′: Please check our Kill Your Darlings review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 62.

Trailer:

Chad Michael Murray

The wheeling and dealing has been getting into full swing at Sundance, below is a list of the films that have currently been sold and who has bought them.

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints – DIR: David Lowery STARS: Casey Affleck, Keith Carradine, Ben Foster, Rooney Mara

Purchased by: IFC Films

Austenland – DIR: Jerusha Hess STARS: Jennifer Coolidge, JJ Feild, Bret McKenzie, Keri Russell

Purchased by: Sony Pictures/Sony Pictures Classics

Before Midnight – DIR: Richard Linklater STARS: Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick, Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke, Ariane Labed

Purchased by: Sony Pictures Classics

Blackfish – DIR: Gabriela Cowperthwaite

Purchased by: CNN Films/Magnolia Pictures

Concussion – DIR: Stacie Passon STARS: Ben Shenkman, Maggie Siff, Johnathan Tchaikovsky, Robin Weigert

Purchased by: Radius/TWC

Dirty Wars – DIR: Rick Rowley STARS: Nasser Al Aulaqi, Saleha Al Aulaqi, Muqbal Al Kazemi, Abdul Rahman Barman

Purchased by: Sundance Selects

Don Jon’s Addiction – DIR: Joseph Gordon-Levitt STARS: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Scarlett Johansson, Brie Larson, Julianne Moore

Purchased by: Relativity

Fruitvale – DIR: Ryan Coogler STARS: Kevin Durand, Michael B. Jordan, Chad Michael Murray, Octavia Spencer

Purchased by: The Weinstein Company

History Of The Eagles Part 1 – DIR: Alison Ellwood STARS: Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Timothy B. Schmit, Joe Walsh

Purchased by: Showtime

Inequality For All – DIR: Jacob Kornbluth

Purchased by: Radius/TWC

Jobs – DIR: Joshua Michael Stern STARS: Amanda Crew, Josh Gad, Ashton Kutcher, Dermot Mulroney

Purchased by: Open Road Films

Kill Your Darlings – DIR: John Krokidas STARS: Dane DeHaan, Michael C. Hall, Elizabeth Olsen, Daniel Radcliffe

Purchased by: Sony Picture Classics

Lovelace – DIR: Rob Epstein, Jeffrey Friedman STARS: Peter Sarsgaard, Amanda Seyfried, Sharon Stone, Juno Temple

Purchased by: Radius/TWC

Morning – DIR: Leland Orser STARS: Elliott Gould, Laura Linney, Leland Orser, Jeanne Triplehorn

Purchased by: Anchor Boy

Newlyweds – DIR: Shaka King STARS: Amari Cheatoe, Trae Harris, Tone Tank, Isiah Whitlock Jr.

Purchased by: Phase 4 Films

Prince Avalanche – DIR: David Gordon Green STARS: Emile Hirsch, Lance Le Gault, Joyce Payne, Paul Rudd

Purchased by: Magnolia Pictures

Show Trial: The Story Of Pussy Riot – DIR: Mike Lerner, Maxim Pozdorovkin STARS: Maria Alyokhina, Yekaterina Samutsevich, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova

Purchased by: HBO Documentary Films

S-VHS – DIR: Simon Barrett, Jason Eisener STARS: Kelsy Abbott, L.C. Holt, Hannah Hughes, Lawrence Michael Levine

Purchased by: Magnolia Pictures

The Look Of Love – DIR: Michael Winterbottom STARS: Steve Coogan, Anna Friel, Stephen Fry, Imogen Poots

Purchased by: IFC Films

The Machine Which Makes Everything Disappear – DIR: Tinatin Gurchiani

Purchased by: Icarus Films

The Rambler – DIR: Calvin Reeder STARS: James Cady, Natasha Lyonne, Dermot Mulroney, Lindsay Pulsipher

Purchased by: Anchor Bay Films

The Spectacular Now – DIR: James Ponsoldt STARS: Kyle Chandler, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Shailene Woodley

Purchased by: A24

The Summit – DIR: Nick Ryan

Purchased by: Sundance Selects

The Way, Way Back – DIR: Nat Faxon, Jim Rash STARS: Steve Carell, AnnaSophia Robb, Sam Rockwell, Amanda Peet

Purchased by: Fox Searchlight

Toy’s House – DIR: Jordan Vogt-Roberts STARS: Moises Arias, Alison Brie, Nick Offerman, Mary Lynn Rajskub

Purchased by: CBS Films

Twenty Feet From Stardom – DIR: Morgan Neville STARS: Lou Adler, Stephanie ‘Stevvi’ Alexander, Patti Austin, Chris Botti

Purchased by: Radius/TWC

Two Mothers – DIR: Anne Fontaine STARS: Ben Mendelsohn, Xavier Samuel, Naomi Watts, Robin Wright

Purchased by: Exclusive Releasing

We Are What We Are – DIR: Jim Mickle STARS: Ambyr Childers, Kelly McGillis, Michael Parks, Wyatt Russell

Purchased by: Entertainment One