Tagged: Bobby Moynihan

Sisters

Summary: Life hasn’t been fair to Maura (Amy Poehler) and Kate Ellis (Tina Fey). When the sisters learn that their parents Bucky (James Brolin) and Deana (Dianne Wiest) are selling the home that they grew up in it makes them realise that life certainly hasn’t turned out the way it was supposed to for either of them.

Maura hasn’t been in a relationship in a long time and through reliving some of Kate’s memories of their teenage years has realised that she has never really lived at all. Meanwhile Kate who was once the party girl is constantly getting fired and is struggling in her relationship with her daughter. Frustrated with the way things are the two girls decide to live once more by throwing one last party in their family home.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 7th January 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Jason Moore

Screenwriter: Paula Pell

Cast: Ike Barinholtz (James), Samantha Bee (Liz), James Brolin (Bucky Ellis), Dan Byrd (Patrick Campbell), Christina Beth Campbell (Young Maura Ellis Age 10), John Cena (Pazuzu), Mia Ciccarelle (Young Maura Ellis Age 6), Samantha Blaire Cutler (Young Kate Age 12), Madison Davenport (Haley), Rachel Dratch (Kelly), Scott Drummond (Officer Higgins), Tina Fey (Kate Ellis), Santino Fantana (Mr. Geernt), Sue Galloway (Jolene Barme), Jon Glaser (Dan), Renee Elise Goldsberry (Kim), Ann Harada (Jean), Brian D’Arcy James (Jerry), Greta Lee (Hae-Won), John Leguizamo (Dave), Britt Lower (Mrs. Geernt), John Lutz (Joel Barme), Adrian Martinez (Officer Harris), Heather Matarazzo (Denny), Kate McKinnon (Sam), Bobby Moynihan (Alex), Matt Oberg (Rob), Chris Parnell (Phil), Paula Pell (Dana), Amy Poehler (Maura Ellis), Maya Rudolph (Brinda), Emily Tarver (Brayla), Kristen Vincent (Young Kate Age 6), Colleen Werthmann (Cray), Dianne Wiest (Deana Ellis)

Runtime: 118 mins

Classification: CTC

 

OUR SISTERS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

The female members of America’s comedy set have been on fire when it has come to films over the past few years. While the likes of Adam Sandler and Will Ferrell have delivered bomb after bomb the women have produced hit after hit. Films like Bridesmaids and Trainwreck have seen the likes of Kristen Wiig and Amy Schumer become household names right around the world. Now comes Amy Poehler and Tina Fey’s (who bring Maya Rudolph along for the ride) new celluloid baby Sisters. The good news while it is doesn’t exactly reach the heights of some of the other films previously mentioned it certainly works and haves you laughing throughout.

What works about Sisters may completely surprise audiences out there. If you’re expecting a smart comedy like Bridesmaids then keep moving because Sisters is very much the female version of a film like American Pie. Directed by Jason Moore (who brought us Pitch Perfect) and written by long-time Saturday Night Live writer Paula Pell Sisters is all about grown women acting badly and Poehler and Fey just seem to lap it up.

In this politically correct time it is surprising what Sisters gets away with. The jokes range from quips about both male and female genitalia right through to the right and wrong ways to announce Asian names. Of course most of the humour centres on the wild antics of the party guests at Maura and Kate’s party-to-end-all-parties but the film also takes some time to take a look at some more serious things such as the fractured relationship between a mother and a daughter through to people realising that their lives have gone completely off track.

The fact that the party provides most of the laughs is a stroke of comedic genius in itself. While there may be one of two too many sight gags the film keeps you laughing all the time. Thanks not only to the humour delivered by Poehler and Fey but also by Ike Barinholtz (who plays Poehler’s love interest), Bobby Moynihan who plays lovable-drug-fuelled-loser Alex and Maya Rudolph who seems to love playing rejected party guest Brinda. Along with other cameo roles, such as John Leguizamo and John Cena, these smaller characters in the film seem to come together and just deliver laugh and laugh and soon you find yourself barracking for more than just the lead characters. Moore and Pell’s decision to allow this to happen may have been a huge risk but it pays off for them time after time.

Of course the stars here though are Poehler and Fey and both just seem to feed off the comedic talent and energy that is around them. However that doesn’t mean that they allow themselves to res on their laurels. No these two work ultra hard as well and while they deliver the laughs that were scripted for them amazingly well you also get the feeling that a lot of this film has been ad-libbed by the pair and that works well as well. While the world may have been concentrating on the new breed of Amy Schumer and co over the past few years it is obvious that Fey and Poehler want to show the world that they are still in the peaks of their career as well.

So many of these party movies fail every year but here Sisters works brilliantly well. While I wouldn’t exactly describe it as a top comedy it does more than enough to keep the laughs coming throughout the film, okay you may even have a couple of laughter explosions during it, and that is more than you can say for a lot of the comedies that are around these days. Even better is the fact that this is some of Poehler and Fey’s finest work and is a must for those that love their brand of comedy.

 

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Sisters (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Sisters reviews: You can listen to our full Sisters  review on a future episode of  The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show. You can also read our Sisters review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

 

Bad Neighbours

Summary: A young family find their lives turned upside down when they suddenly find themselves living next door to a college fraternity house.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 8th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Nicholas Stoller

Screenwriter: Andrew J. Cohen, Bendan O’Brien

Cast: Chastey Ballesteros (Alecia), Ike Barinholtz (Jimmy), Hannibal Buress (Officer Watkins), Rose Byrne (Kelly Radner), Robbie Carlysle (Dr. Junk), Jerrod Carmichael (Garf), Ilia Constantine (Tiger), Ali Corbin (Whitney), Zach Cosby (Stink), Zac Efron (Teddy Sanders), Dave Franco (Pete), Carla Gallo (Paula), Brian Huskey (Bill Wazowkowski), Jake Johnson, Wendy Knight (Liz Cackowski), Lisa Kudrow (Carol Gladstone), Jason Mantzoukas (Dr. Theodorakis), Christopher Mintz-Plasse (Scoonie), Bobby Moynihan, Demetice Nguyen (Noah), Randall Park, Craig Roberts (Assjuice), Seth Rogen (Mac Radner), Halston Sage (Brooke), Pascal Shin (Justin), Kira Sternbach (Brittany), Elise Vargas (Stella), Zoey Vargas (Stella), D.J. Waldman (Ruth Bader Ginsburg)

Runtime: N/A

Classification:CTC

OUR BAD NEIGHBOURS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

David Griffiths:

The last few years haven’t been kind to the whole comedy genre… especially with the films coming out of Hollywood. Adam Sandler has continued on his merry way of delivering absolute rubbish and he seems to have dragged down most other comedy teams down with him. The exceptions were Ted and Bad Grandpa, films that nailed there mark and achieved exactly what they set out to do… and that is make people laugh. Now comes another film that could join the class of those two – Bad Neighbours – which in my case made me laugh so much I couldn’t breathe.

With Nicholas Stoller (the director who brought us Forgetting Sarah Marshall) at the helm Bad Neighbours sees young married couple Mac (Seth Rogen) and Kelly Radner (Rose Byrne) trying to come to the terms that they are now the parents of a young daughter named Stella. They both want to remain cool, they want to attend raves, smoke their weed but somehow still be good parents. It seems to be a losing battle though with the pair falling asleep before they even make it out the front door at times.

Then their world literally changes when the house next door to them is bought by a college fraternity. A frat house that is led by the misdirected Teddy Sanders (Zac Efron), the nerdy but cool Pete (Dave Franco) and the appendage ‘gifted’ Scoonie (Christopher Mintz-Plasse). At first Mac and Kelly try to befriend the frat and it seems like the film is heading down the ‘buddy film’ route but then an incident involving the Police soon turns things sour.

With the division lines drawn between Mac and Kelly and Teddy and co a ‘brutal’ neighbourhood war breaks out which sees the Frat house still trying to organise an event they will always be remembered for while finding themselves under the watchful eye of their Dean, Carol Gladstone (Lisa Kudrow) who will do anything to keep their college from ‘negative headlines.’ With this in mind Mac and Kelly devise a plan to bring down the Frat.

The reason Bad Neighbours works so well is because as director Stoller leads this film to go directly where he wants it to go, and do what he wants it to do – and that is make people laugh. Sure the screenplay could have gone into some massive back stories for all the characters involved, but that would have bogged down the film and made it a bit of snore-fest with some laughs just splattered here and then… much the same as Judd Apatow’s recent efforts.

But Stoller and crew take a different route here. Instead it sets up nearly all the characters as likable but reveals very little about anything else. You like them, you care for them… bang that’s all it really needs. Stoller then loads up on gags that actually work – the proof being that in the large audience I saw this film in that people of all ages were reduced to laughing until they cried.

There does need to be a little warning though, at times the humour in the film does very crass, and if you didn’t like films like Ted or American Pie etc then this isn’t the film for you. To those that did like these kinds of films though you will be in absolute heaven as the script tries, and pulls off, varies styles of humour from witty one liners, to sight gags and some brilliant gross-out humour that will at times have you laughing while trying to cover your eyes.

Also making Bad Neighbours the good film that it becomes is the cast. Seth Rogen is on absolute fire here. He points behind him the disappointment of films like The Green Hornet and once again reminds audiences why he should still be considered one of the best comedic leading men of our age. He is also well supported by Rose Byrne who completely surprised Australian audiences when she seemingly turned her back on dramatic acting and was cast in Bridesmaids. Since then she has shown just what a fine comedic actress she is, and she continues that here in Bad Neighbours as she plays a Mum desperate to be cool. Some actresses of Byrne’s calibre might agree to do a film like this but shirk away from some of the more risqué scenes, but here Byrne gladly lines up with Rogen to deliver some ‘interesting’ scenes including one that sees her get ‘milked like a cow.’

Despite the limits of their characterisation the actors behind the Frat boy team also come to the fore. Christopher Mintz-Plasse simply does what is asked of him while Dave Franco seems to turn the clock back and seems much younger then he actually is. Like Byrne he also once again reminds audiences that he too is up to pulling off comedic roles when it is asked of him. The star of the Frat boys though is of course Zac Efron who has delivered a mixture of films since ending the High School Musical franchise. From gritty films such as The Paperboy to comedies such as this one he has really revealed himself as a young actor who is more than just a pretty face and can deliver whatever is asked of him.

Bad Neighbours is the kind of film where everything comes together perfectly. A hilarious script, some great comedic directing and a cast willing to go to great lengths for laughs all come together and deliver one of the funniest films to have surfaced in a long time. It’s crass and wrong but this is a film will have you in stitches.

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  Neighbors (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Bad Neighbours′: Nil.

Trailer:

Delivery Man

Summary: An affable underachiever finds out he’s fathered 533 children through anonymous donations to a fertility clinic 20 years ago. Now he must decide whether or not to come forward when 142 of them file a lawsuit.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Ken Scott

Screenwriter: Ken Scott, Martin Petit

Cast: Andrzej Blumenfeld (Mikolaj), Adam Chanler-Berat (Viggo), Matthew Daddario (Channing), Kate Dalton (Sabrina), Simon Delaney (Victor), Lyndia Gravatt (Judge Logan), Jermaine Hollman (Mays), Kevin Hopkins (Andrew Johansson), Van Hughes (Young David), Jay Leno (himself), Bill Maher (himself), Bobby Moynihan (Aleksy), Nicole Neuman (Emma), Dave Patten (Adam), Chris Pratt (Brett),Sebastian Rene (Ryan),  Jack Reynor (Josh), Britt Robertson (Kristen), Cobie Smulders (Emma), Amos VanderPoel (Taylor), Vince Vaughn (David), Damian Young (Attorney Williams)

Runtime: 105 mins

Classification:M

OUR DELIVERY MAN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Nick Gardener: Stars(2.5)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Delivery Man’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #61

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Delivery Man (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Delivery Man′: Please check our Delivery Man review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 61.

Trailer:

Monsters University

Summary: Mike Wazowski and James P. Sullivan are an inseparable pair, but that wasn’t always the case. From the moment these two mismatched monsters met they couldn’t stand each other. Monsters University unlocks the door to how Mike and Sulley overcame their differences and became the best of friends.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 20th June, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Dan Scanlon

Screenwriter: Robert L. Baird, Daniel Gerson, Dan Scanlon

Cast: Beth Behrs (PNK Carrie (voice)), Steve Buscemi (Randy (voice)), Billy Crystal (Mike (voice)), Charlie Day (Art (voice)), Nathan Fillion (Johnny (voice)), Dave Foley ((voice)), John Goodman (Sullivan (voice)), Bill Hader (Referee/Slug (voice)), Sean Hayes (Terri (voice)), Bonnie Hunt (Mrs. Graeves (voice)), Noah Johnston (Young Mike (voice)), John Krasinski (Frank McCay (voice)), Helen Mirren (Dean Hardscrabble (voice)), Alfred Molina (Professor Knight (voice)), Bobby Moynihan (Chet (voice)), Joel Murray (Don (voice)), Bob Peterson (Roz (voice)), Aubrey Plaza (Claire Wheeler (voice)), John Ratzenberger (Yeti (voice)), Peter Sohn (Squishy (voice), Julia Sweeney (Ms. Squibbles (voice))

Runtime: 110 mins

Classification:G

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘MONSTERS UNIVERSITY’:

David Griffiths: Stars(3)

Please check Dave’s review of ‘Monsters University’ that is available on The Helium Entertainment Channel

Greg King: Stars(3)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Monsters University’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(3)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Monsters University’ that is available on the Built For Speed website

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Monsters University (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Internship′: Please check episode #37 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show for more reviews of ‘The Internship’.

Trailer: