Tagged: Catherine Keener

Enough Said

Summary: A divorced and single parent, Eva (Julia Louis Dreyfus) spends her days enjoying work as a masseuse but dreading her daughter’s impending departure for college. She meets Albert (James Gandolfini in one of his final performances) – a sweet, funny and like-minded man also facing an empty nest. As their romance quickly blossoms, Eva befriends Marianne (Catherine Keener), her new massage client who happens to be Albert’s ex-wife. Suddenly, Eva finds herself doubting her own relationship with Albert as she learns the truth about Marianne’s ex.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th November, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: 2nd April, 2014

Country: USA

Director: Nicole Holofcener

Screenwriter: Nicole Holofcener

Cast: Alina Adams (Grace), Philip Brock (Jason), Toni Collette (Sarah), Tracey Fairaway (Ellen), Ben Falcone (Will), James Gandolfini (Albert), Tavi Gevinson (Chloe), Luke Grakal (Brandon), Eve Hewson (Tess), Toby Huss (Peter), Anjelah Johnson-Reyes (Cathy), Catherine Keener (Marianne), Amy Landecker (Debbie), Natasha Sky Lipson (Sage), Lennie Loftin (Martin), Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Eva), Kathleen Rose Perkins (Fran), Christopher Niicholas Smith (Hal), Jessica St. Clair (Cynthia), Ivy Stohmaier (Maddy), Michaela Watkins (Hilary), Nick Williams (Chris)

Runtime: 91 mins

Classification:M

OUR ENOUGH SAID REVIEWS & RATINGS:

David Griffiths: 

“Enough Said” is guaranteed to have film lovers going to have a look at it. After all, it is the final film for the talented James Gandolfini (“Nicky Deuce,” “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone”), although this is a film that deserves an audience for an entirely different reason. So often romance films hit the cinema and then are quickly criticised for their poor scripts and woeful acting. This isn’t the case for “Enough Said” that overcomes a couple of low patches with some strong acting performances and a script that is guaranteed to engage.

Directed and written by Nicole Holofcener (“I Hate That I Love You,” “Please Give”) “Enough Said” centres around divorced masseuse Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus – “Planes,” TV’S “Veep”) who struggles through her mundane job while preparing for the fact that her daughter Tess (Eve Hewson – “Blood Ties,” “This Must Be The Place”) is about to leave home and head to college.

Her life however becomes a little better when she attends a party with her best friend Sarah (Toni Collette – “Lucky Them,” “The Way Way Back”) and firstly meets an exciting new client, a poet named Marianne (Catherine Keener – “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa,” “Captain Phillips”) and then the intriguing Albert (James Gandolfini).

While Albert is not the kind of guy that Eva would date in a million years he fascinates her and despite some warning signs she decides to take a chance for once in her life and start a relationship with him.

A few things will hit you about “Enough Said”, beginning with the sensational script. Holofcener throws everything out the window when it comes to scripts for romantic films. There are a couple of clichés in the third act but aside from that, the script is almost as alternative as last year’s “Take This Waltz.” The film contains so much really natural dialogue which makes the characters endearing and just when it feels like Holofcener has put the film into cruise control the film hits hard with a twist that no one sees coming. It’s a twist that sets up a sensational second half of the film.

The script also throws in a few curveballs along the way. At time it does feel like the screenplay is man-slapping with characters such as Will (Ben Falcone – “Bad Words,” “The Heat”) but that evens out with some of the nasty, bitchy comments that are made about Albert throughout the film, which highlights a rarely explored topic in cinema – that sometimes it can be females that are all about body image.

Holofcener’s screenplay is manipulating in a good way. It draws the audience in and makes you like both Albert and Eva, meaning that real suspense builds around the relationship. The script also allows for the right mix of drama and comedy (yes this a comedy that you will actually laugh at), while it expertly uses its peripheral characters such Will and Chloe (Tavi Gevinson – “Cadaver,” “First Bass”) to full comedic and dramatic effect.

The second big thing that hits you about “Enough Said” are the quality of the acting performances of the cast. James Gandolfini overcomes an awkward opening few minutes and delivers a performance that is heartfelt. He is well supported by Julia Louis-Dreyfus who seems to brush aside the myth that “Seinfeld” actors haven’t had success in movies with a brilliant performance that will hopefully see her appear in more films in the future.

Also good in her smaller role is Toni Collette who does enough to make film lovers forget all about her woeful work on “Mental.” Also really announcing herself in “Enough Said” is young Tavi Gevinson who excels as the lost Chloe and often steals the spotlight away from her more esteemed cast mates.

“Enough Said” is surprisingly good and is a great reminder that there can be some classy well-written and engaging romantic films still made in Hollywood.

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  Enough Said (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Entertainment Enough Said reviews: You can read Dave Griffiths’ Enough Said review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Jackass Presents Bad Grandpa

Summary: 86-year-old Irving Zisman is on a journey across America with the most unlikely companion: his 8 year-old grandson, Billy.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th November, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: 26th March, 2014

Country: USA

Director: Jeff Tremaine

Screenwriter: Fax Bahr (story), Spike Jonze (story), Johnny Knoxville, Adam Small (story), Jeff Tremaine

Cast: Georgina Cates (Kimmie), Greg Harris (Chuck), Spike Jonze (Gloria), Catherine Keener (Ellie), Johnny Knoxville (Irving Zisman), Jackson Nicoll (Billy)

Runtime: 92 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Nick Gardner: Stars(2)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #58

Adam Ross: Stars(3)

Please check Adam’s review of ‘Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #58

David Griffiths: 

Okay, so not everybody over the years is going to have enjoyed what the Jackass guys have delivered to cinema screens. That’s okay, everybody has their own likes and dislikes. Still, when you are approaching a film to review it, you have to take into consideration whether the film does what it sets out to do. With that in mind, it does make reviewing a film such as “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” a little easier.

While this certainly isn’t a film for the faint-hearted it does see the crew behind Jackass try something a little different to what they have done before. This time they mix up their stunts/hijinx with a narrative. It’s flimsy, but basically the film tells the story of 85 year old pensioner Irving Zisman (Johnny Knoxville – “The Last Stand,” “Movie 43”), who has just heard the news that his wife Ellie (Catherine Keener – “Captain Phillips,” “Can A Song Save Your Life”) has passed away.

Rather than allow the news to upset Irving decides that with her out of the way he can now live his life, however that thought is quickly extinguished when he also learns that his daughter Kimmie (Georgina Cates – “The Upshot,” TV’s “The Closer”) is going to jail for drug offenses and that he is going to have his drive his 8-year-old grandson Billy (Jackson Nicoll – “Fun Size,” “The Stand Up”) across country to his deadbeat father, Chuck (Greg Harris – “Wrong,” TV’s “The Cynical Life Of Harper Hall”).

The story is not strong and the screenplay is not great, yet “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” does more than its fair share to entertain. The story does draw in the audience and you feel close to the characters, but of course this movie is all about the practical jokes and the humour and it is here that it delivers the pay load.

As you would have seen from previous Jackass films, Johnny Knoxville will do anything for a laugh, and nothing changes here. From placing his wedding tackle in a vending machine through to severely embarrassing himself in a strip-club, nothing is taboo. To Knoxville’s credit every prank featured in the film works and even the most hardened critic who may believe themselves above this kind of humor may find themselves crying with laughter in the cinema. Knoxville knows how to make an audience and isn’t that exactly what someone wants from a comedy film?

Of course though, Johnny Knoxville couldn’t just get through this film by getting hurt and putting himself in embarrassing situations. With a script in it he has to also find the ability to act. Luckily though that is something that Knoxville is more than capable of; people forget that over his career he has appeared in films such as “The Dukes Of Hazzard” and “The Ringer” and while he certainly hasn’t had the Academy wanting to give him an award, he has shown that he can be a pretty good comedic actor. Once again, Knoxville more than handles the acting that is required of him in “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa.” Along with a great latex job, Knoxville morphs into Irving eerily well and it’s easy to see how so many people where conned by him as he travelled across America.

Johnny Knoxville’s partner in crime this time around is young Jackson Nicoll who sadly had to endure working on “Fun Size” previously. He was one of the highlights in that film and here in “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa,” he certainly shows himself to be a young comedic actor who may well have a good future ahead of him. Nicoll matches the skills of Knoxville in many scenes and when he is called upon to ad lib he also does sensationally well. He is one comedic actor who certainly needs to have an eye kept on him.

If you’re looking for high art then “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” certainly ain’t there, but if you want a film that will simply make you laugh, then you’d be an idiot to miss it.

Stars(3.5)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #58

Trailer:

The Croods

Summary: The Croods is a prehistoric comedy adventure that follows the world’s first family as they embark on a journey of a lifetime when the cave that has always shielded them from danger is destroyed. Traveling across a spectacular landscape, the Croods discover an incredible new world filled with fantastic creatures — and their outlook is changed forever.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Kirk De Micco, Chris Sanders

Screenwriter: Chris Sanders, Kirk De Micco, John Cleese

Cast: Nicolas Cage (Grug (voice)), Clarke Duke (Thunk (voice)), Catherine Keener (Ugga (voice)), Cloris Leachman (Gran (voice)), Ryan Reynolds (Guy (voice)), Chris Sanders (Belt (voice)), Emma Stone (Eep (voice)), Randy Thom (Sandy (voice))

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Croods’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘The Croods’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Crodds′: Check Episode #26 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘The Croods’.

Subculture Media ‘The Croods’ Interviews: Interviews with various cast members of ‘The Croods’ can be found here.

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating:The Croods (2013) on IMDb

Performance

Summary:  Set in contemporary Manhattan, PERFORMANCE tells the story of four musicians, bound together by their passion for music and a long, faithful collaboration. The celebrated string quartet struggles to stay together as they mark their 25th anniversary.

When their dignified patriarch and cellist, Peter (Walken) is diagnosed with a terminal illness, it throws the future of the group into question. His attempt to find a replacement player and organise rehearsals for their upcoming concert bring up unresolved issues and grievances.

Daniel (Ivanir) is the first violin. Robert (Seymour Hoffman) plays second violin, but longs to be the lead. Juliette (Keener) plays viola and is married to Robert, and steadfastly refused to consider the quartet without Peter.

Alliances are forged, egos bruised and passions flare as the dysfunctional family of artists begin to implode. Can they pull together for one final great performance – of Beethoven’s Opus 131 at Carnegie Hall?

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Yaron Zilberman

Screenwriter: Seth Grossman, Yaron Zilberman

Cast: Liraz Charhi (Pilar), Philip Seymour Hoffman (RobertGelbart), Mark Ivanir (Daniel Lerner), Madhur Jaffrey (Dr. Nadir), Catherine Keener (Juliette Gelbert), Nina Lee (Nina Lee), Megan McQuillan (Brenda), Imogen Poots (Alexandra Gerbert), Wallace Shawn (Gideon Rosen), Anne Sofie von Otter (Miriam), Christopher Walken (Peter Mitchell), Andrew Yee (Steve)

Runtime: 106 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Performance’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘Performance’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Performance′: Check Episode #24 (available 14th March, 2013) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Performance’.

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating:A Late Quartet (2012) on IMDb

Performance

Summary: Set in contemporary Manhattan, PERFORMANCE tells the story of four musicians, bound together by their passion for music and a long, faithful collaboration. The celebrated string quartet struggles to stay together as they mark their 25th anniversary.

When their dignified patriarch and cellist, Peter (Walken) is diagnosed with a terminal illness, it throws the future of the group into question. His attempt to find a replacement player and organise rehearsals for their upcoming concert bring up unresolved issues and grievances.

Daniel (Ivanir) is the first violin. Robert (Seymour Hoffman) plays second violin, but longs to be the lead. Juliette (Keener) plays viola and is married to Robert, and steadfastly refused to consider the quartet without Peter.

Alliances are forged, egos bruised and passions flare as the dysfunctional family of artists begin to implode. Can they pull together for one final great performance – of Beethoven’s Opus 131 at Carnegie Hall?

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Yaron Zilberman

Screenwriter: Seth Grossman, Yaron Zilberman

Cast: Liraz Charhi (Pilar), Philip Seymour Hoffman (RobertGelbart), Mark Ivanir (Daniel Lerner), Madhur Jaffrey (Dr. Nadir), Catherine Keener (Juliette Gelbert), Nina Lee (Nina Lee), Megan McQuillan (Brenda), Imogen Poots (Alexandra Gerbert), Wallace Shawn (Gideon Rosen), Anne Sofie von Otter (Miriam), Christopher Walken (Peter Mitchell), Andrew Yee (Steve)

Runtime: 106 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘A Late Quartet’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘A Late Quartet’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘A Late Quartet′: Check Episode #24 (available 14th March, 2013) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘A Late Quartet’.

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating:A Late Quartet (2012) on IMDb