Tagged: Chris O’Dowd

Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children

 

 

Summary: When Jacob discovers clues to a mystery that spans different worlds and times, he finds Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. But the mystery and danger deepen as he gets to know the residents and learns about their special powers.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 29th September 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK, Belgium, USA

Director: Tim Burton

Screenwriter: Jane Goldman, Ransom Riggs (novel)

Cast: Nicholas Amer (Oggie), Jack Brady (Mr. Clark), Asa Butterfield (Jake), Raffiella Chapman (Claire Densmore), Justin Davies (Worm), Pixie Davies (Bronwyn Bruntley), Louis Davison (Victor Bruntley), Helen Day (Miss Edwards), Judi Dench (Miss Avocet), Rupert Everett (Ornithologist), Aidan Flowers (10 Year Old Jacob), Eva Green (Miss Alma LeFay Peregrine), Scott Handy (Mr. Gleeson), Ioan Hefin (Kev), Samuel L. Jackson (Barron), Allison Janney (Dr. Golan), Jennifer Jarackas (Aunt Susie), O-Lan Jones (Shelley), Hayden Keeler-Stone (Horace Somnussion), Cameron King (Millard Nullings), Mary Leonard (Mary), Finlay MacMillan (Enoch O’Connor), Lauren McCrostie (Olive Abroholos Elphanta), Chris O’Dowd (Franklin Portman), Joseph Odwell (Masked Ballerina #1), Thomas Odwell (Maked Ballerina #2), Nicholas Oteri (6 Year Old Jacob), Milo Parker (Hugh Apiston), Georgia Pemberton (Fiona Fruanfeld), Philip Philmar (Mr Archer), Ella Purnell (Emma Bloom), Terence Stamp (Abraham Portman), Brooke Jaye Taylor (Aunt Judy), Shaun Thomas (Dylan), George Vricos (Uncle Bobby), Robert Milton Wallace (Malfous)

Runtime: 127 mins

Classification: PG

OUR MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Tim Burton fans it is time to rejoice because the man of creepiness is back with a film that once again sees him using his creative genius to full effect. The last few years has seen Burton serve up films like Big Eyes and Dark Shadows – films that to be honest have been a waste of his talents. With Miss Peregine’s Home For Peculiar Children though Burton once again lets his creativity come to the fore as he delivers a film that is visually appealing and brings some ‘older’ special effects back to life.

Based on a novel by Ransom Riggs Miss Peregine’s Home For Peculiar Children centres around Jake (Asa Butterfield Ender’s Game) an unpopular teenager who has been brought up listening to his ­Grandfather Abe’s (Terence Stamp Wanted) tales of a miraculous island that he once lived on. Jake’s father, Franklin (Chris O’Dowd The Sapphires) tells him these tales are part of his Grandfather’s dementia but Jake finds himself wondering whether or not they are true when he finds Abe brutally murdered and he witnesses a ‘monster’ at the scene.

Soon Jake finds himself discovering that Abe’s stories are true as he meets Miss Peregrine (Eva Green Dark Shadows) a mysterious shape shifter who looks after a school for children with peculiar abilities, such as Emma (Ella PurnellNever Let Me Go), and makes sure that the ‘loop’ they live in resets each day. While at first Jake believes their lifestyle is picturesque who soon becomes involved in their dangerous war with the psychotic Barron (Samuel L. Jackson Pulp Fiction).

On the surface it would be very easy to dismiss Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children as a mish-mash of Harry Potter and X-Men but with Burton at the helm this film becomes much more than that. Burton’s finger-prints are all over this film from start to finish. While the opening scenes of the stale white store where Jake works seems largely un-Burtonesque it gives way to a world where Burton can bring a steam punk feel to a World War II bombing raid, use ‘jumpy’ special effects during a scene of re-animated dolls fighting and use old-school CGI to bring skeletons to life for a large scale battle. To some younger cinema goers the use of the ‘older’ effects may seem a little strange it does fit the film’s storyline of flashing between time periods… and better still it’s Burton being his creative self.

Storywise the film does have a fair bit to get your head around. While the time-jumping sequences will be very quick to lose you Burton gets away with it by the fact that Jake himself doesn’t fully understand what is happening either. Generally though this is your typical good versus evil storyline with a touch of coming-of-age as the audience gets to experience Jake’s first romance as well.

Under the watchful eye of Tim Burton the cast here regularly get a chance to shine. While Butterfield’s performance is nowhere near as intense as his performance in Ender’s Game he still does a good job. Likewise Samuel L. Jackson is far from his best but seems to be having fun as he plays the menacing Barron. The real standouts here though are Eva Green and Ella Purnell. Purnell announces herself as a star of the future with a performance very similar to what Burton normally gets out of Mia Wasikowska. Green plays Miss Peregrine as a sultry character that we can only help returns to the screen soon.

Whether Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children is meant to kick-start a franchise or simply be a one off movie the film holds its own as Burton delivers a film a little too dark for children but something that adults and young adults will certainly warm to. This surprisingly good film sees Burton return to do what he does best – produce a creepy yet truly creative film.

Stars(3.5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children Reviews: Nil

Trailer:

St. Vincent

Summary: When Maggie (Melissa McCarthy) is forced to move house with her son Oliver (Jaeden Lieberher) due to a divorce she doesn’t count on the fact that her new next door neighbour is going to be someone that she will never forget.

On the outside Vincent (Bill Murray) is a grump who has let his house go to ruin, wastes all of his money at the track (which is just one of his many vices), never has a kind word to say to anyone and is usually in the company of his ‘good friend and companion’ stripper-turned-prostitute Daka (Naomi Watts). But when Oliver one day returns home from school after bullies have stolen his key and turns to Vincent for help Maggie finds herself hiring the ‘neighbour from hell’ as her babysitter, something that can only lead to trouble or so it seems.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: 19th December, 2014

Country: USA

Director: Theodore Melfi

Screenwriter: Theodore Melfi

Cast: Scott Adsit (David), Dario Barosso (Ocinski), Reg E. Cathey (Gus), Amber Clayton (Amber), Nate Corddry (Terry), Sade Demorcy (Keesha), Ann Dowd (Shirley), Emma Fisher (Bridgette), Niles Fitch (Brooklyn), Alexandra Fong (Rachele), Terrence Howard (Zucko), David Iacono (Jeremiah), Ray Iannicelli (Roger), Jaeden Lieberher (Oliver), Melissa McCarthy (Maggie), Ron McLarty (Principal O’Brien), Donna Mitchell (Sandy), Bill Murray (Vincent), Deirdre O’Connell (Linda), James Andrew O’Connor (Antwan), Chris O’Dowd (Brother Geraghty), Kimberly Quinn (Nurse Ana), Maria Elena Ramirez (Amelda), Lenny Venito (Coach Mitchell), Naomi Watts (Daka), Brenda Wehle (Judge Reynolds)

Runtime: 102 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR ST. VINCENT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg KingYou can check out Greg’s St. Vincent review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(4)

 

Nick GardenerYou can check out Nick’s St. Vincent review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #110

Stars(4)

 

David Griffiths:

Over recent years acting legend Bill Murray has become an actor who really knows how to pick a decent script. Sure he will always be remembered for cult classics like Groundhog Day or Ghostbusters but back then Murray also delivered up a dog of a film quite regularly. Flash forward to recent years when Murray has taken chances on films such as The Darjeeling Limited, Get Low, Zombieland and Moonrise Kingdom and they have resulted in him appearing in some of the top films of the years they were released. Well it seems that Murray’s knack of picking the right script has worked again with a role in new comedy St. Vincent.

There haven’t been many comedy highs over the last year or so, and to be honest Melissa McCarthy has sadly been involved in some of the worst of those but St. Vincent is the one comedy that should remind people that every now and then America still knows how to hit an audience right on a funny bone. Add that to the fact that this film also delivers some thought pondering drama and it is easy to see why St. Vincent should be considered one of the films of the year.

The most surprising thing about St. Vincent is that it comes from a relative newcomer to the directing/screenwriting game. Aside from short films the only time that Theodore Melfi has ventured into feature film territory was to deliver the very average Rachel Hunter led Winding Roads back in 1999. Just one viewing of St. Vincent will quickly tell you that the fact that Melfi has delivered a film in the fifteen years since is an absolute crime because this is a gem.

Melfi’s screenplay is clearly one of the best of the year as it makes a completely unlikable character literally a saint. A brief look at Vincent and you would think that he has all the merits to make him a ‘bad guy’ in a film like this. A foul-mouthed and dirty living old man who is prepared to sue a single, struggling, divorced mother over a small amount of damage to a car and a fence is not the kind of character an audience will normally warm to, but such is the power of Melfi’s script that soon you find yourself laughing out loud at Vincent’s crassness and even ‘barracking’ for him as he tries to outrun the loan shark who is desperate to get his money and break some knees. The fact that Melfi has the sense to use his screenplay to give Vincent real characterisation and not just make him a one dimensional character also goes a long way to making this film work.

Supported by such a well written screenplay it is hardly surprising that the cast also comes to the fore in St. Vincent. Melissa McCarthy puts outside some recent poor performances to put in a credible performance in a role where she isn’t called upon to deliver a laugh a minute. Murray is at his exceptional best mixing comedy and drama into a character that seems like he will become a cult cinema favourite.

Young Jaeden Lieberher also puts in a stunning debut, he certainly seems to be an actor who his acting well above his age range, while the film is further enhanced by good acting performances by actors in the smaller roles. Naomi Watt’s is a standout as European prostitute Daka while Chris O’Dowd also puts in a warm, nice performance even though he is skirting thin ice but almost becoming type cast to play Catholic priests in films these days.

There is just so much to love about St. Vincent that this review could go on forever. From its beautifully written script to the fact that it bravely decides to be different to most either comedies on the market, to the fact that Bill Murray puts in a truly memorable acting performance there is just no weakness with St. Vincent at all. Clearly one of the better films of this year St. Vincent also announces the arrival of a filmmaker who is well worth watching in the future.

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating: St. Vincent (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment St. Vincent reviews: For our full Keep On Keepin’ On review make sure you check out The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #110. You can also read our review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Calvary

Summary: Father James is a good priest, driven by spiritual integrity. One day in confession, an unseen man tells James that he’s going to kill him precisely because he’s done nothing wrong. Given a week to make his peace with God, James ministers to sundry lost souls—visits that double as a guided tour of suspects. His preparation for death is further complicated by the arrival of his daughter, who has recently attempted suicide.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 3rd July, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Ireland, UK

Director: John Michael McDonagh

Screenwriter: John Michael McDonagh

Cast: Marie-Josee Croze (Teresa), Isaach De Bankole (Simon), Aidan Gillen (Dr. Frank Harte), Brendan Gleeson (Father James Lavelle), Domhnall Gleeson (Freddie Joyce), Michael Og Lane (Micheal), Gary Lydon (Inspector Stanton), David McSavage (Bishop Garrett Montgomery), Dylan Moran (Michael Fitzgerald), Chris O’Dowd (Jack Brennan), Orla O’Rourke (Veronica Brennan), Kelly Reilly (Fiona Lavelle), Killian Scott (Milo Herlihy), Owen Sharpe (Leo), Pat Shortt (Brendan Lynch), M. Emmet Walsh (The Writer), David Wilmot (Father Leary)

Runtime: 101 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR CALVARY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Adam Ross: You can check out Greg’s Calvary review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #86

Stars(4)

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Calvary review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3.5)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s The Last Impresario review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #85

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  Calvary (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Calvary′: For our full Calvary review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #86

Trailer:

Cuban Fury

Summary: A former salsa prodigy attempts a comeback years after his career was ruined by a rival dancer.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 20th March, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: James Griffiths

Screenwriter: Jon Brown

Cast: Liz Cackowski (Paula), Alex Clarke (James), Olivia Colman (Sam), Nick Frost (Bruce Garrett), Yanate Fuentes (Alicia), Rashida Jones (Julia), Michael Keat (The Cuban Brothers Miguel Mantovani), Rory Kinnear (Gary), Ethan J. Knight (Andrew), Wendi McLendon-Covey (Carly), Ian McShane (Ron Parfait), Susana Montero (Gloria), Kayvan Novak (Bejan), Chris O’Dowd (Drew), Kengo Oshima (The Cuban Brothers Kengo-San), Simon Pegg (Driver), Tim Plester (Mickey), Ben Radcliffe (Young Bruce), James Reilly (Harvey), Alexandra Roach (Helen), Philippe Spall (Mr. Jarvis), Isabella Steinbarth (Young Sam), Alison Thurgood (Gemma)

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification:M

OUR CUBAN FURY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

David Griffiths:

After the disappointment that was The World’s End last year actor Nick Frost really owes his fans something special. While there have been the obvious films such as Hot Fuzz and Shaun Of The Dead that have seen Nick Frost at his best, he also manages to surprise cinema goers every now and then with surprise hits like Attack Of The Block. Now comes Cuban Fury a film that certainly isn’t a masterpiece, but a film that is just likable to make it a crowd favourite.

Frost plays Bruce Garrett a lovable loser in life who in his junior days was a champion salsa dancer. During that period he was known for his heels of fire and his coach, Ron Parfait (Ian McShane) led him and his dance partner, his sister Sam (Olivia Colman) to dance title after dance title. But then Bruce’s life changed forever when he found himself bashed by a gang who took exception to his sequin shirt that he was wearing to the National Championships. At that moment Bruce turned his back on his dancing career and made a vow to never salsa again.

Flash forward quite a number of years and Bruce know works for a company that designs industrial lathes. He enjoys his life but there isn’t much for him to do. He works, hangs out with Sam at the bar that she works in and then once a week catches up with his loser friends and plays golf with them.

But then suddenly something comes into Bruce’s life that gives it meaning again – his new boss Julia (Rashida Jones). While Bruce wants to win the hand of the fair maiden he finds himself constantly put down by his arch rival in love, the bully Drew (Chris O’Dowd) and finds himself believing that there is no possible way he can win her affection. It is then that he discovers Julia has a love for salsa and wonders whether or not it is possible to capture that old magic once again.

Director James Griffiths (who is mostly known for his television work) really has found himself at the helm of a safe film when it comes to Cuban Fury. Screenwriter, Jon Brown has handed him a script that is full of clichés but also has that winning formula that has made a few dime-a-dozen comedies work over the years. Yes Cuban Fury isn’t the kind of film that will win awards or win over the serious cinema goer but will certainly entertain your average popcorn set film fan.

Brown’s script is interesting. It is sign-posted within an inch of its life but at the same time manages to throw up in just enough laughs to lure the audience in and having them chuckling along with the film as it goes. Film buffs that have seen a lot of films over the years will be able to pick exactly where this film is going from scene-to-scene but at the same time they won’t be disappointed as the laughs are more than enough to keep them entertained.

The saddest thing about the script of Cuban Fury though is at times it does hold back its cast. Rashida Jones, Olivia Colman, Ian McShane and Kayvan Novak (who play extremely stereotypical gay Arab, Bejan) are given so little to do during the film that they don’t even have to raise a sweat as they breeze through their lines. However the script doesn’t seem to handicap the comedic abilities of its two leads though. Chris O’Dowd seems to relish being able to play the bully-boy while Frost overcomes the fact that he has one of the least dancer-like bodies in the history of cinema to deliver a lovable performance. The dance-off between O’Dowd and Frost is one of the highlights of the film.

Cuban Fury overcomes its clichéd script to become a watchable beer-and-pizza comedy that will be enjoyed by men and women alike. There’s also a brief appearance by Simon Pegg for all the fans of The Cornetto Trilogy.

Stars(2.5)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Cuban Fury (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Cuban Fury′: Nil.

Trailer:

Epic

Summary: Epic is a CG action-adventure comedy that reveals a hidden world unlike any other. From the creators of “Ice Age” and “Rio”, Epic tells the story of an ongoing battle deep in the forest between the forces of good who keep the natural world alive and the forces of evil who wish to destroy it. When a teen age girl finds herself magically transported into this secret universe, she must band together with a rag-tag team of fun and whimsical characters in order to save their world… and ours.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 27th June, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Chris Wedge

Screenwriter: James V. Hart, William Joyce, Daniel Shere, Tom J. Astle, Matt Ember, Chris Wedge

Cast: Blake Anderson (Dagda (voice)), Aziz Ansari (Mub (voice)), Todd Cummings (Fruit Fly (Old) (voice)), Colin Farrell (Ronin (voice)), Dan Green (Finn (voice)), Josh Hutcherson (Nod (voice)), Beyonce Knowles (Queen Tara (voice)), Anthony Lumia (Fruit Fly (Young) (voice)), Chris O’Dowd (Grub (voice)), Pitbull (Bufo (voice)), Amanda Seyfried (Mary-Katherine (M.K.) (voice)), Jason Sudeikis (Bomba (voice)), Steven Tyler (Nim Galuu (voice)), Christoph Waltz (Mandrake (voice))

Runtime: 102 mins

Classification:PG

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘EPIC’:

David Griffiths: Stars(4)

Please check Dave’s review of ‘Epic’ that is available on The Helium Entertainment Channel

Greg King: Stars(3)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Epic’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(3)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Satellite Boy’ that is available on the Built For Speed website

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:  Epic (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Epic′: Please check Episode #38 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show for more reviews of ‘Epic’.

Trailer:

AFCA

The nominations for the 2013 AFCA Awards are:

BEST FILM: Hail, Lore, The King Is Dead, The Sapphires, Wish You Were Here

BEST DIRECTOR: Wayne Blair (The Sapphires), Amiel Courtin-Wilson (Hail), Kieran Darcy-Smith (Wish You Were Here), Ralph de Heer (The King Is Dead), Cate Shortland (Lore)

BEST ACTOR: Joel Edgerton (Wish You Were Here), Matthew Goode (Burning Man), Daniel P Jones (Hail), Ewen Leslie (Dead Europe), Chris O’Dowd (The Sapphires)

BEST ACTRESS: Toni Collette (Mental), Deborah Mailman (The Sapphires), Felicity Price (Wish You Were Here), Saskia Rosendahl (Lore), Sarah Snook (Not Suitable For Children)

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Marton Csokas (Dead Europe), Liev Schrieber (Mental), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Dead Europe), Antony Starr (Wish You Were Here), Garry Waddell (The King Is Dead)

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Essie Davis (Burning Man), Rebecca Gibney (Mental), Deborah Mailmen (Mental), Jessica Mauboy (The Sapphires), Bojana Novakovic (Burning Man)

BEST SCREENPALY: Amiel Courtin-Wilson (Hail), Cate Shortland & Robin Mukherjee (Lore), Rolf de Heer (The King Is Dead), Keith Thompson & Tony Briggs (The Sapphires), Kieran Darcy-Smith & Felicity Price (Wish You Were Here)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: Adam Arkapaw (Lore), Germain McMicking (Hail), Germain McMicking (Dead Europe), Jules O’Loughlin (Wish You Were Here), Garry Phillips (Burning Man), Warwick Thornton (The Sapphires)

BEST EDITING: Jason Ballantine (Wish You Were Here), Martin Connor (Burning Man), Dany Cooper (The Sapphires), Veronika Jenet (Lore), Peter Sciberras (Hail)

BEST MUSIC SCORE: Steve Benwell (Hail), Antony Partos (33 Postcards), Max Richter (Lore), Cezary Skubiszewski (The Sapphires), Graham Tardif (The King Is Dead)

BEST OVERALL PRODUCTION DESIGN: Zohie Castalleno (Hail), Melinda Doring (The Sapphires), Silke Fischer (Lore), Steven Jones-Evans (Burning Man), Graham Walker (Mental)

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM (FOREIGN LANGUAGE): A Separation, Holy Motors, Le Havre, The Kid With A Bike, The Raid

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM (ENGLISH LANGUAGE): Argo, Beasts Of The Southern Wild, Deep Blue Sea, Hugo, Moonrise Kingdom

BEST DOCUMENTARY: All The Way Through Evening, I Am 11, Life In Movement, Paul Kelly: Stories Of Me, Searching For Sugarman

The Sapphires

The winners of the 2nd annual Australian Academy of Cinema and Televsion Arts Awards were last night announced at a star studded ceremony in Sydney last night. The night was hosted by Russell Crowe and the Awards were announced by the likes of Cate Blanchett, Geoffrey Rush, Nicole Kidman, Stephen Curry and Ricky Ponting.

Here is the full list of winners.

FILM

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
• Iron Sky. Samuli Torssonen, Jussi Lehtiniemi, Juuso Kaari, Kelly Myers.

AACTA RAYMOND LONGFORD AWARD
• Al Clark

TELEVISION
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CHILDREN’S TELEVISION SERIES
• The Adventures of Figaro Pho. Dan Fill, Frank Verheggen, David Webster. ABC3

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION COMEDY SERIES
• Lowdown – Season 2. Nicole Minchin, Amanda Brotchie, Adam Zwar. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION SERIES
• Agony Aunts. Adam Zwar, Nicole Minchin. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE IN A TELEVISION COMEDY
• Patrick Brammall. A Moody Christmas. ABC1

SHORT FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT ANIMATION
• The Hunter. Marieka Walsh.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT FICTION FILM
• Julian. Robert Jago, Matthew Moore.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN A SHORT FILM
• Transmission. Zak Hilditch.

DOCUMENTARY

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FEATURE LENGTH DOCUMENTARY
• Storm Surfers 3D. Ellenor Cox, Marcus Gillezeau.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY UNDER ONE HOUR
• Then The Wind Changed. Jeni McMahon, Celeste Geer. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY SERIES
• Go Back To Where You Came From. Rick McPhee, Ivan O’Mahoney. SBS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Fighting Fear. Macario De Souza. FOXTEL – Movie Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Fighting Fear. Tim Bonython, Chris Bryan, Macario De Souza, Lee Kelly. FOXTEL – Movie Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Once Upon A Time In Cabramatta – Episode 1. Sam Wilson. SBS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Dr Sarmast’s Music School. Dale Cornelius, Livia Ruzic, Keith Thomas. ABC1

FEATURE FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
• The Sapphires. Warwick Thornton.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING
• The Sapphires. Dany Cooper ASE.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND
• The Sapphires. Andrew Plain, Bry Jones, Pete Smith, Ben Osmo, John Simpson.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE
• Not Suitable For Children. Matteo Zingales, Jono Ma.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
• The Sapphires. Melinda Doring.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN
• The Sapphires. Tess Schofield.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST YOUNG ACTOR
• Saskia Rosendahl. Lore.

NEWS.COM.AU AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD FOR MOST MEMORABLE SCREEN MOMENT
• The Sapphires.

BYRON KENNEDY AWARD
• Sarah Watt

TELEVISION
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST REALITY TELEVISION SERIES
• The Amazing Race Australia. Michael McKay, Trent Chapman, David Gardner, Matthew Kowald. Seven Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES
• Puberty Blues. John Edwards, Imogen Banks. Network Ten

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEFEATURE OR MINI SERIES
• Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War. John Edwards, Mimi Butler. Nine Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN TELEVISION
• Jack Irish: Bad Debts. Jeffrey Walker. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN TELEVISION
• Redfern Now – Episode 6 ‘Pretty Boy Blue’. Steven McGregor. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Richard Roxburgh. Rake – Season 2. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Leah Purcell. Redfern Now – Episode 1 ‘Family’. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Aaron Jeffery. Underbelly Badness – Episode 3 ‘The Loaded Dog’. Nine Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Mandy McElhinney. Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War – Part 2. Nine Network

FEATURE FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FILM
• The Sapphires. Rosemary Blight, Kylie du Fresne.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
• The Sapphires. Wayne Blair.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
• Wish You Were Here. Kieran Darcy-Smith, Felicity Price.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
• The Sapphires. Keith Thompson, Tony Briggs.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR
• Chris O’Dowd. The Sapphires.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS
• Deborah Mailman. The Sapphires.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
• Antony Starr. Wish You Were Here.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
• Jessica Mauboy. The Sapphires.
2nd AACTA Awards_Winners and Nominees_Luncheon, Ceremony & International Page 10 of 10

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY
• Django Unchained. Quentin Tarantino.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
• Silver Linings Playbook. David O. Russell.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST ACTOR
• Daniel Day-Lewis Lincoln.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST ACTRESS
• Jennifer Lawrence. Silver Linings Playbook.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST FILM
• Silver Linings Playbook. Donna Gigliotti, Bruce Cohen, Jonathan Gordon.

This Is 40

Summary: Five years after writer/director Judd Apatow introduced us to Pete and Debbie in Knocked Up, Paul Rudd and Leslie Mann reprise their roles as a husband and wife both approaching a milestone meltdown in THIS IS 40, an unfiltered, comedic look inside the life of an American family.

After years of marriage, Pete lives in a house of all females: wife Debbie and their two daughters, eight-year-old Charlotte (Iris Apatow) and 13-year-old Sadie (Maude Apatow). As he struggles to keep his record label afloat, he and Debbie must figure out how to forgive, forget and enjoy the rest of their lives… before they kill each other.

In his fourth directorial outing, Apatow’s new comedy captures what it takes for one family to flourish in the middle of a lifetime together. What emerges is a deeply honest portrait of the challenges and rewards of marriage and parenthood in the modern age. Through the filmmaker’s unblinking lens, we follow one couple’s three-week navigation of sex and romance, career triumphs and financial hardships, aging parents and maturing children.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 17th January, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Judd Apatow

Screenwriter: Judd Apatow

Cast: Ryan Adams (himself), Iris Apatow (Charlotte), Maude Apatow (Sadie), Billie Joe Armstrong (himself), Tim Bagley (Dr. Pellagrino), Joanne Baron (Vice Principal Laviatri), Albert Brooks (Larry), R. Matt Carle (himself), Lisa Darr (Claire), Lena Dunham (Cat), Megan Fox (Desi), Scott Wesley Hartnell (himself), Elly Kaye (Marissa), Ryan Lee (Joseph), John Lithgow (Oliver), Leslie Mann (Debbie), Melissa McCarthy (Catherine), Annie Mumolo (Barb), Chris O’Dowd (Ronnie), Ian Laperriere (himself), Graham Parker (himself), Blake Garrett Rosenthal (Thomas), Paul Rudd (Pete), The Rumour Band (themselves), Ava Sambora (Wendy), Jason Segel (Jason), Molly Shad (Grandma Molly), Robert Smigel (Barry), James F. Van Riemsdyk), Charlyne Yi (Jodi)

Runtime: 134 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘This Is 40’ Review: 

There is no doubting that Judd Apatow is one of the best comedy writers in modern cinema. The fact that he is the man responsible for films like ‘Knocked Up’ and ’40 Year Old Virgin’ proves that. But then of course he is also the man responsible for ‘You Don’t Mess With The Zohan’.

It is because of that latter fact that whenever you hear that a new Judd Apatow movie is hitting the cinemas that you can’t help but have a little bit of nervousness in the pit of your stomach when you sit down to watch it. But Apatow fans you can breathe a sigh of relief because his new film ‘This Is 40’ certainly sits in the good column.

In a way ‘This Is 40’ is a ‘kinda’ sequel to ‘Knocked Up’ because it centres around Debbie (Leslie Mann – Para-Norman, The Change-Up) and Pete (Paul Rudd – Prince Avalanche, The Perks Of Being A Wallflower), two characters we first met back in Apatow’s comedy classic. They are your typical married couple, they have two children Sadie (Maude Apatow – Funny People, Knocked Up) and Charlotte (Iris Apatow – Funny People, Knocked Up), Pete runs his own record label and Debbie runs a clothing shop aided by her employees, Jodi (Charlyne Yi – TV’S House, TV’S Love Bites) and Desi (Megan Fox – Friends With Kids, Passion Play)… one of which is stealing from her.

With both Debbie and Pete now hitting their forties Pete seems to be coping fine, but Debbie is stressing out and begins to wonder about their marriage. Making things even worse is the fact that Pete has a massive secret, because his business is failing, no matter how much co-worker Ronnie (Chris O’Dowd – The Sapphires, Friends With Kids) tries to stop it happening, and because Pete keeps giving money to his father Larry (Albert Brooks – Drive, TV’S The Simpsons) they are facing the fact they may have to sell their house.

When ‘This Is 40’ reaches its peak it has you almost falling out of your seat with laughter… Apatow really does know how to deliver the laughs, and the fact that the film centres around an ordinary family will mean that most people watching will be able to relate to it.

But that’s not to say that the film doesn’t have some weaknesses. At just on two and a half hours it does feel a little wrong and that could have easily been fixed by taking out the stories revolving around the thefts at the shop and also Debbie’s father, Oliver (John Lithgow – The Campaign, New Years Eve). With these stories omitted ‘This Is 40’ would have been a lot shorter and may have even been able to break into the ‘great comedy’ category.

When it comes to the acting everybody seems to be at the top of their game. Paul Rudd backs up from his performance in ‘The Perks Of Being A Wallflower’ with another great performance and he is well supported by Leslie Mann. However it is the subsidiary actors like Chris O’Dowd and Melissa McCarthy (Bridesmaids, TV’S Mike & Molly) that seem to steal the show… especially McCarthy whose scene in the headmasters office is one of the funniest scenes ever show in cinema (also remember to stick around when the film ends because her rant continues during the credits).

‘This Is 40’ may run a little long but you won’t mind because you’ll be laughing all the way through it.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘This Is 40′: Check Episode #16 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘This Is 40’. Dave’s other review of ‘This Is 40’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating: This Is 40 (2012) on IMDb

The Sapphires

And the nominees are:

FEATURE FILM

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FILM
Burning Man
Lore
The Sapphires
Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
Jonathan Teplitzky, Burning Man
Cate Shortland, Lore
Wayne Blair, The Sapphires
Kieran Darcy-Smith, Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Burning Man
Mental
Not Suitable For Children
Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Lore
The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Burning Man
Lore
The Sapphires
Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING
Burning Man
The Sapphires
Wish You Were Here
X

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND
Burning Man
Lore
The Sapphires
Swerve

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE
33 POSTCARDS
A Few Best Men
Mental
Not Suitable For Children

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
Burning Man
Killer Elite
Lore
The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Burning Man
Lore
Mental
The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR
Joel Edgerton, Wish You Were Here
Matthew Goode, Burning Man
Chris O’Dowd, The Sapphires
Guy Pearce, 33 POSTCARDS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS
Toni Collette, Mental
Deborah Mailman, The Sapphires
Felicity Price, Wish You Were Here
Sarah Snook, Not Suitable For Children

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Ryan Corr, Not Suitable For Children
Liev Schreiber, Mental
Antony Starr, Wish You Were Here
Gary Waddell, The King Is Dead!

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Essie Davis, Burning Man
Rebecca Gibney, Mental
Deborah Mailman, Mental
Jessica Mauboy, The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST YOUNG ACTOR
Brenna Harding, Puberty Blues
Ed Oxenbould, Julian
Saskia Rosendahl, Lore
Lily Sullivan, Mental

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Iron Sky
Killer Elite
The Sapphires
Utopia Girls — How Women Won The Vote

AACTA RAYMOND LONGFORD AWARD
Al Clark

TELEVISION

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CHILDREN’S TELEVISION SERIES
The Adventures of Figaro Pho
Dance Academy — Series 2
Flea-bitten!
Guess How Much I Love You — The Adventures of Little Nutbrown Hare

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION COMEDY SERIES
A Moody Christmas
Danger 5
Lowdown — Season 2
Shaun Micallef’s Mad As Hell

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION SERIES
Adam Hills In Gordon Street Tonight — Series 2
Agony Aunts
Gruen Sweat
The Hamster Wheel — Series 1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST REALITY TELEVISION SERIES
The Amazing Race Australia
MasterChef Australia — Series 4
My Kitchen Rules — Series 3
The Voice

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES
Puberty Blues
Rake — Season 2
Redfern Now
Tangle — Season 3

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEFEATURE OR MINI SERIES
Beaconsfield
Devil’s Dust
Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Underground

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN TELEVISION
The Amazing Race Australia
Beaconsfield
Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Jack Irish: Bad Debts

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN TELEVISION
A Moody Christmas — Episode 5 “Water Under the Bridge”
Lowdown — Season 2 — Episode 3 “One Fine Gay”
Puberty Blues — Episode 5
Redfern Now — Episode 6 “Pretty Boy Blue”

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Jimi Bani, Mabo
Anthony Hayes, Devil’s Dust
Lachy Hulme, Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Richard Roxburgh, Rake — Season 2

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Ashleigh Cummings, Puberty Blues
Essie Davis, Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries
Susie Porter, Dangerous Remedy
Leah Purcell, Redfern Now

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Luke Carroll, Redfern Now
Abe Forsythe, Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Aaron Jeffrey, Underbelly Badness
Dan Wyllie, Puberty Blues

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Shareena Clanton, Redfern Now
Mandy McElhinney, Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Susan Prior, Puberty Blues
Laura Wheelwright, Underground

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE IN A TELEVISION COMEDY
Patrick Brammall, A Moody Christmas
Barry Crocker, The Strange Calls
Damon Herriman, Laid — Series 2
Frank Woodley, Woodley

SHORT FILM

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT ANIMATION
The Hunter
LEGO Star Wars: The Padawan Menace
The Maker
Sleight of Hand

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT FICTION FILM
B I N O
Dumpy Goes to the Big Smoke
Julian
Transmission

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN A SHORT FILM
B I N O
Dumpy Goes to the Big Smoke
Julian
Transmission

DOCUMENTARY

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FEATURE LENGTH DOCUMENTARY
A Common Purpose
The Curse of the Gothic Symphony
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Storm Surfers 3D

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY UNDER ONE HOUR
All the Way
I Can Change Your Mind About Climate
The Man Who Jumped
Then the Wind Changed

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY SERIES
Go Back to Where You Came From
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta
Singapore 1942 – End of Empire
Sporting Nation

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN A DOCUMENTARY
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Fighting Fear
Go Back to Where You Came From
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY IN A DOCUMENTARY
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Fighting Fear
Go Back to Where You Came From
Storm Surfers 3D

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING IN A DOCUMENTARY
Chateau Chunder — A Wine Revolution
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta
Storm Surfers 3D

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND IN A DOCUMENTARY
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta
Paul Kelly — Stories of Me
Singapore 1942 – End of Empire

Summary:It s 1968, and four young, talented Australian aboriginal girls learn about love, friendship and war when their all girl group the sapphires entertain the us troops in Vietnam.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 9th August, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 7th December, 2012

Country: Australia

Director: Wayne Blair

Screenwriter: Tony Briggs, Keith Thompson

Cast: Merelyn Adamson (Major Wicks), Tammy Anderson (Evelyn), Don Battee (Myron Ritchie), Kylie Belling (Geraldine), Nioka Brennan (Young Kay), Carlin Briggs (Young Jimmy), Eko Darville (Hendo), Martin Farrugia (Max), Gregory J. Fryer (Selwyn), Georgina Haig (Glynnis), Annette Hodgson (Noelene), Tory Kittles (Robby), Tanika Lonesborough (Young Gail), Judith Lucy (Merle), Miah Madden (Young Julie), Deborah Mailman (Gail), Jessica Mauboy (Julie), Wayne McDaniel (Lou McGarrick), Amy Miller-Porter (Vera), Ava Jean Miller-Porter (Young Cynthia), Rhys Muldoon (Uncle Ed), Koby Murray (Baby Hartley), Lynette Narkle (Nanny Theresa), Chris O’Dowd (Dave), Hunter Page-Lochard (Steve Kayne), T.J. Power (Lt. Jenson), Ben Rodgers (Fish), Jake Ryan (Cochese), Jasper Sarkodee (Pinky), Shari Sebbens (Kay), Miranda Tapsell (Cynthia), Tom Whitechurch (Young Tommy), Cleave Williams (Duggie), Meyne Wyatt (Jimmy Middleton)

Runtime: 103 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Sapphires’ Review:

Red Dog started the ball rolling now it seems that other filmmakers have realised that not all Australian films have to be about dark, depressing topics. Certainly director, Wayne Blair (TV’S Lockie Leonard & Redfern Now) has realised that as his feature film directional debut, The Sapphires is an uplifting tale that is guaranteed to please any audience.

Based on real events The Sapphires is about three Aboriginal sisters, Gail (Deborah Mailman – Mabo, TV’S Offspring), Julie (Jessica Mauboy – Bran Nue Dae, TV’S Underbelly) and Cynthia (Miranda Tapsell – Mabo, TV’S Magical Tales) who dream about escaping the Aboriginal mission they call home and making it big as singers.

The dream seems fair fetched as they live in a racist outback town but when failed musician Dave (Chris O’Dowd – Friends With Kids, Bridesmaids) he decides to manage them, patch up differences with their cousin, Kay (Shari Sebbens – Violet) and then help them win a competition that will see them perform for the troops in Vietnam.

Thanks to a brilliant screenplay The Sapphires is able to provide the audience with a variety of comedy, drama and music. The film does go into some pretty deep subjects such as racism and tribal acceptance yet never once do you feel that the message is completely in your face.

With The Sapphires Wayne Blair also announces himself as one of Australia’s most promising directors. Together with cinematographer Warwick Thornton (who directed the brilliant Samson & Delilah) he makes this film look stunning on the big screen. Credit must be paid to both of them for making the Vietnam war scenes look so realistic despite a small budget.

The film does have some flaws, at times the story and some of the acting verge on being weak, but this is largely overshadowed by an amazing soundtrack and some brilliant performances by the films leads. Deborah Mailman again shows why she is one of Australia’s finest actors while Chris O’Dowd mixes comedy and drama together brilliantly in what is the best performance of his career so far. They are also well supported by Jessica Mauboy who is beginning to show that she is a talented actress as well as an amazing singer.

The Sapphires is an amazing film that works on all levels. The fact that it mixes music, drama and comedy together so well makes it an absolute gem.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Sapphires’: http://www.helium.com/items/2358683-movie-reviews-the-sapphires-2012

Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating:The Sapphires (2012) on IMDb