Tagged: Dave Franco

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This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Don’t Breathe,’ ‘Sunset Song,’ ‘Nerve,’ ‘Girl Asleep,’ ‘Mechanic:Resurrection,’ and ‘Blood Father’. This episode also contains interviews with Daniel Zovatto, Jane Levy, Dylan Minnette, Emily Meade, Miles Heizer, Dave Franco, Emma Roberts, Mel Gibson, Jason Statham, Tommy Lee Jones, Jessica Alba, Terence Davies, Rosemary Myers, Trudy Hellier (‘Little Acorns’) and Luke Sparke (‘Red Billabong’).

We also launch two great new competitions this week so make sure you check both of them out below:

Our first competition this week sees you have a chance this week to win a fabulous DVD pack thanks to our friends at Icon Film Distribution and the release of ‘The Confirmation’, starring Clive Owen, Jaeden Lieberher, Maria Bello, Tim Blake Nelson and Patton Oswalt in cinemas on the 15th September. For your chance to win this ‘The Confirmation’ pack, which includes a double pass to ‘The Confirmation’ and copies of ‘Death At A Funeral,’ ‘What Women Want,’ ‘Infinitely Polar Bear’ and ‘Dan In Real Life’ on DVD simply listen to the show and then send your answer to this week’s question via private message to either our Facebook or Twitter pages.

Our second competition this week sees you have a chance this week to win a copy of ‘Cleverman Season 1’ on DVD/Blu-Ray thanks to our friends at eOne Entertainment. One lucky winner will also win a main prize of a signed sketch by production designer Jacob Nash (attached). The sketch is of the mythical beast the Namorrodor. For your chance to win this amazing prize simply listen to the show and then send your answer to this week’s question via private message to either our Facebook or Twitter pages.

You can listen to The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show or download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Nerve

With the new suspense thriller ‘Nerve’, starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts hitting cinemas this week Roadshow films have just released these fantastic new Behind The Scenes featurettes that take you, the viewer, behind the scenes of some of the most important scenes in the film.

‘Nerve’ hits Australian cinemas on the 1st September.

Nerve: Bergdorf Dare Behind The Scenes

 

Nerve: Machine Kelly Behind The Scenes

 

Nerve: Tattoo By The Fat Jew Behind The Scenes

 

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Queen Of The Desert,’ ‘Money Monster,’ ‘Now You See Me 2’  and ‘Neon’. This episode also contains interviews with Lawrence Johnston, Julia Roberts, George Clooney, Daniel Radcliffe, Jesse Eisenberg, Dave Franco, Lizzy Caplan, Mark Ruffalo and Morgan Freeman.

Also make sure you listen to this week’s episode to see how you can win a copy of Jason Schwartzman’s new film ’7 Chinese Brothers’ thanks to our good friends at eOne Entertainment. Once you’ve heard the question on the show you can enter on our Facebook or Twitter pages.

And we have a bonus giveaway on this weeks’s episode. Make sure you listen to see how you can win a copy of  ’Blood Punch’  on DVD thanks to our good friends at Bounty Films…. but wait there’s more your DVD will be signed by the star of the film Milo Cawthorne. Once you’ve heard the question on the show you can enter on our Facebook or Twitter pages.

You can listen to The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show or download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Bad Neighbours 2

 

Summary: Just as Mac (Seth Rogen) and Kelly (Rose Byrne) sell their home and plan on moving to the suburbs they suddenly find themselves under attack again as a sorority led by party girl Shelby (Chloe Grace Moretz) move in next door. The arrival of former frat boy Teddy (Zac Efron) has everybody asking which side he will decide to join.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th May 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Nicholas Stoller

Screenwriter: Andrew Jay Cohen, Brendan O’Brien, Nicholas Stoller, Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg

Cast: Ike Barinholtz (Jimmy), Spencer Boldman (Derek), Hannibal Buress (Officer Watkins), Rose Byrne (Kelly Radner), Jerrod Carmichael (Garf), Kiersey Clemons (Beth), Zac Efron (Teddy Sanders), Beanie Feldstein (Nora), Dave Franco (Pete), Carla Gallo (Paula), Selena Gomez (Madison), Kelsey Grammer (Shelby’s Father), Lisa Kudrow (Dean Carol Gladstone), Christopher Mintz-Plasse (Scoonie), Chloe Grace Moretz (Shelby), Seth Rogen (Mac Radner), Elise Vargas (Stella), Zoey Vargas (Stella)

Runtime: 92 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR BAD NEIGHBOURS 2: SORORITY RISING REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

The last few things have shown us that comedy sequels often do not live up to original film in the franchise… especially, so it seems, if that original film was an absolute comedy gem. Comedy fans have watched as franchise after franchise have taken this ill-fated path as – Zoolander 2, Horrible Bosses 2, Hangover 2 + 3 and Anchorman 2 have all fallen well short of the brilliance that their predecessor had brought. The result was scorn from film critics and comedy lovers right around the world.

Now we find ourselves sitting down to watch Bad Neighbours 2: Sorority Rising a film born into existence after the shock success of the 2014 adult rated comedy. With much of the key cast and crew returning for a second trip you could be excused for thinking that this film would be just as good… sadly that wasn’t the case.

This time around we find young parents Mac (Seth Rogen – This Is The End) and Kelly Radner (Rose Byrne – Insidious) expecting their second child and in the middle of selling their home as they decide to move their expanding family out to the suburbs. With the house sold the couple just have to hope that nothing goes wrong during the thirty day cooling off period.

Enter Shelby (Chloe Grace Moretz – Kick-Ass) who feels that the sororities are getting the raw end of the deal when she discovers that they can’t party the same way as fraternities. Desperate to proves that girls can do it just as well as boys she moves her sorority into the house next to Mac and Kelly’s causing the couple to realise that their nightmare is coming true. Worse still is the fact that after being thrown out by his best friend, Pete (Dave Franco – Now You See Me), former fraternity leader Teddy Sanders (Zac Efron – The Lucky One) is only too happy to teach them everything he knows.

Sadly though Bad Neighbours 2 is another sequel that struggles to get anywhere near the quirkiness and humor that the first film managed to produce. The sad thing about this film is that it should have been painfully clear for anyone watching the first cuts of the film to see what had gone wrong – yes the problems here at basic but enough to sink the film.

The main thing that drags down this film is some very lazy and poor screenwriting. At times it feels like the writers here forgot key points from the first film, things such as the fact that at the end of the film Mac and Teddy met up and seemingly settled their difference, yet at the beginning of this film it feels like they haven’t seen each other since the frat moved out and Teddy still has a score to settle. Likewise much of the ‘wrong’ comedy that made the first film work so well are missing here. At the screening I was at the audience burst into laughter the 2-3 times the writers were game enough to attempt a politically incorrect joke but for the rest of time barely raised a chuckle as attempted jokes just played out on the screen in front of them.

The other big issue with Bad Neighbours 2: Sorority Rising is the members of the sorority themselves. It seems like the writers were hamstrung with what they should do with most of the female characters this time around. On one hand they set up Shelby, Nora (Beanie Feldstein – Fan Girl) and Beth (Kiersy Clemons – Dope) as bad girls who want to live up life at college. Yet when it comes to the crust of things we see anything but and the girls end up becoming walking clichés whose actions seem to become very ‘unimportant’ to the writers. In one scene a big deal is made about the fact that Shelby is a virgin yet her ‘Shelby Lost Her Virginity’ is shown in a quick ten second montage. As if that isn’t made enough the writers seem to have borrowed the characteristics of the girls from Pitch Perfect – perhaps they didn’t think we would notice that the alternative girl, the larger girl and the strange-speaking Asian character act had all been done before.

Sadly it seems the sorority was ruined by writers who seemed to want to make the characters too politically correct and as a result they lost their hard edge. Remember back to the original film when Teddy, Pete and Scoonie (Chrisopher Mintz-Plasse – How To Train Your Dragon) were politically incorrect yet also had memorable characterisation? Well all of that is missing here from the girls of the sorority and boy does it show. Perhaps the writers needed to revisit films like Valentine and Sorority Row to see how ‘bad’ sorority girls should be written.

The other unfortunate losers when it comes to the writing are the cast. Rogen and Byrne are certainly held back from delivering the good comedic performances they did in the first film and while supporting cast members like Ike Barinholtz (Sisters) and Carla Gallo (We Bought A Zoo) do get the odd laugh here and there it just isn’t enough to save the film. And as for poor Chloe Grace Moretz, well this normally good actress is reduced to a ‘nothing’ role that is best to be left off her resume.

In reigning in Bad Neighbours 2: Sorority Rising and making it more politically correct than the original film in the franchise the powers-that-be behind the film have made this a largely unfunny film that rehashes old jokes and doesn’t even deserve to live in the shadow of its much more impressive brother. Fans of the original film beware, you will not get as many laughs this time around.

Stars(2)

 

 

Adam Ross:

You can hear Adam Ross’s full Bad Neighbours 2: Sorority Rising review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #175.

Stars(3)

 

 

Greg King:

You can hear Greg King’s full Bad Neighbours 2: Sorority Rising review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #175.

Stars(2.5)

 

 

Kyle McGrath:

Movie sequels can be very hit and miss for any number of reasons, for every Terminator 2 there’s a Terminator 3. Comedy sequels are much more miss than hit, this usually has to do with the set up for the original film not really being suited for a franchise. Some movies like 22 Jump Street or Robocop 2 feature self aware humor about this. As if the writers are nodding to the audience saying “yeah we know its silly, just go with it”. Not every comedy movie needs to break the fourth wall like this but it sometimes helps to know the filmmakers understood how ridiculous it was to make a sequel to something that was better suited as a one off. When they don’t then often the movie can come off as a shameless cash in.

Bad Neighbors 2 is the sequel to the hugely successful 2014 comedy. When we last left our protagonists new parents Mac (Seth Rogan) and Kelly (Rose Byrne) they had successfully defeated the troublesome fraternity and its leader Teddy (Zac Efron) who had moved in next door to their new home. They were content and ready to continue their lives without fear of loud late night parties next door or stray condoms in their front yard. Flash forward 2 years and Mac and Kelly are expecting a second child, despite all their money going into their new home in the first film it is apparently time to upgrade to another house in a different neighborhood. They’ve bought their new home, sold their “old” house to new home owners and are now waiting for the 30 day cool off period to end before they can officially move on. Much to their dismay at this point a sorority led by pot smoking partying Shelby (Chloe Grace Moretz) and her forgettable friends moves in to the old frat house next door and Mac and Kelly and the audience find history repeating itself.

Personally I really enjoyed the original Bad Neighbors. The characters were as believable as they needed to be, the improvisation (line-o-rama) scenes didn’t feel out of place and the humor was on par with what I expected. It was a somewhat average frat-house comedy but I enjoyed it. This movie didn’t quite match that. To be honest I didn’t have high expectations yet still I felt disappointed. Generally it feels like a lazy rehash of the original movie without any of the minimal characterization or even minimal originality which made it decent. The story largely playing out the same way we saw it 2 years ago but without the focus on the characters that was needed it streamed from one joke to the next without me ever seeing why I should care about anyone in the movie. The “this is sexist” angle is played out in such an over the top hamfisted but unfunny way im not sure why they bothered in the first place.

Bad Neighbors 2 is a movie which probably shouldn’t have been made. While not being quite as bad its very much on the Hangover 2 side of comedy sequels. I’m much more a fan of “follow ups” than sequels in this case where the same crew and principal actors make another movie in the same vein as the original rather than a straight sequel. I’d much rather Hot Fuzz than Shaun of The Dead 2. If only something similar had been done here.

Stars(2)

 

 

Nick Gardener:

You can hear Nick Gardener’s full Bad Neighbours 2: Sorority Rising review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #175.

Stars(2)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(2.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Bad Neighbours 2: Sorority Rises reviews: You can also listen to our full Bad Neighbours 2: Sorority Rises review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #175.

Trailer:

Bad Neighbours

Summary: A young family find their lives turned upside down when they suddenly find themselves living next door to a college fraternity house.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 8th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Nicholas Stoller

Screenwriter: Andrew J. Cohen, Bendan O’Brien

Cast: Chastey Ballesteros (Alecia), Ike Barinholtz (Jimmy), Hannibal Buress (Officer Watkins), Rose Byrne (Kelly Radner), Robbie Carlysle (Dr. Junk), Jerrod Carmichael (Garf), Ilia Constantine (Tiger), Ali Corbin (Whitney), Zach Cosby (Stink), Zac Efron (Teddy Sanders), Dave Franco (Pete), Carla Gallo (Paula), Brian Huskey (Bill Wazowkowski), Jake Johnson, Wendy Knight (Liz Cackowski), Lisa Kudrow (Carol Gladstone), Jason Mantzoukas (Dr. Theodorakis), Christopher Mintz-Plasse (Scoonie), Bobby Moynihan, Demetice Nguyen (Noah), Randall Park, Craig Roberts (Assjuice), Seth Rogen (Mac Radner), Halston Sage (Brooke), Pascal Shin (Justin), Kira Sternbach (Brittany), Elise Vargas (Stella), Zoey Vargas (Stella), D.J. Waldman (Ruth Bader Ginsburg)

Runtime: N/A

Classification:CTC

OUR BAD NEIGHBOURS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

David Griffiths:

The last few years haven’t been kind to the whole comedy genre… especially with the films coming out of Hollywood. Adam Sandler has continued on his merry way of delivering absolute rubbish and he seems to have dragged down most other comedy teams down with him. The exceptions were Ted and Bad Grandpa, films that nailed there mark and achieved exactly what they set out to do… and that is make people laugh. Now comes another film that could join the class of those two – Bad Neighbours – which in my case made me laugh so much I couldn’t breathe.

With Nicholas Stoller (the director who brought us Forgetting Sarah Marshall) at the helm Bad Neighbours sees young married couple Mac (Seth Rogen) and Kelly Radner (Rose Byrne) trying to come to the terms that they are now the parents of a young daughter named Stella. They both want to remain cool, they want to attend raves, smoke their weed but somehow still be good parents. It seems to be a losing battle though with the pair falling asleep before they even make it out the front door at times.

Then their world literally changes when the house next door to them is bought by a college fraternity. A frat house that is led by the misdirected Teddy Sanders (Zac Efron), the nerdy but cool Pete (Dave Franco) and the appendage ‘gifted’ Scoonie (Christopher Mintz-Plasse). At first Mac and Kelly try to befriend the frat and it seems like the film is heading down the ‘buddy film’ route but then an incident involving the Police soon turns things sour.

With the division lines drawn between Mac and Kelly and Teddy and co a ‘brutal’ neighbourhood war breaks out which sees the Frat house still trying to organise an event they will always be remembered for while finding themselves under the watchful eye of their Dean, Carol Gladstone (Lisa Kudrow) who will do anything to keep their college from ‘negative headlines.’ With this in mind Mac and Kelly devise a plan to bring down the Frat.

The reason Bad Neighbours works so well is because as director Stoller leads this film to go directly where he wants it to go, and do what he wants it to do – and that is make people laugh. Sure the screenplay could have gone into some massive back stories for all the characters involved, but that would have bogged down the film and made it a bit of snore-fest with some laughs just splattered here and then… much the same as Judd Apatow’s recent efforts.

But Stoller and crew take a different route here. Instead it sets up nearly all the characters as likable but reveals very little about anything else. You like them, you care for them… bang that’s all it really needs. Stoller then loads up on gags that actually work – the proof being that in the large audience I saw this film in that people of all ages were reduced to laughing until they cried.

There does need to be a little warning though, at times the humour in the film does very crass, and if you didn’t like films like Ted or American Pie etc then this isn’t the film for you. To those that did like these kinds of films though you will be in absolute heaven as the script tries, and pulls off, varies styles of humour from witty one liners, to sight gags and some brilliant gross-out humour that will at times have you laughing while trying to cover your eyes.

Also making Bad Neighbours the good film that it becomes is the cast. Seth Rogen is on absolute fire here. He points behind him the disappointment of films like The Green Hornet and once again reminds audiences why he should still be considered one of the best comedic leading men of our age. He is also well supported by Rose Byrne who completely surprised Australian audiences when she seemingly turned her back on dramatic acting and was cast in Bridesmaids. Since then she has shown just what a fine comedic actress she is, and she continues that here in Bad Neighbours as she plays a Mum desperate to be cool. Some actresses of Byrne’s calibre might agree to do a film like this but shirk away from some of the more risqué scenes, but here Byrne gladly lines up with Rogen to deliver some ‘interesting’ scenes including one that sees her get ‘milked like a cow.’

Despite the limits of their characterisation the actors behind the Frat boy team also come to the fore. Christopher Mintz-Plasse simply does what is asked of him while Dave Franco seems to turn the clock back and seems much younger then he actually is. Like Byrne he also once again reminds audiences that he too is up to pulling off comedic roles when it is asked of him. The star of the Frat boys though is of course Zac Efron who has delivered a mixture of films since ending the High School Musical franchise. From gritty films such as The Paperboy to comedies such as this one he has really revealed himself as a young actor who is more than just a pretty face and can deliver whatever is asked of him.

Bad Neighbours is the kind of film where everything comes together perfectly. A hilarious script, some great comedic directing and a cast willing to go to great lengths for laughs all come together and deliver one of the funniest films to have surfaced in a long time. It’s crass and wrong but this is a film will have you in stitches.

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  Neighbors (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Bad Neighbours′: Nil.

Trailer:

Podcast

This week on the show Dave, Nick, Adam and Greg take a look at new release films ‘Beyond The Hills’, ‘The Bling Ring’, Now You See Me’, ‘Pain & Gain’, ‘Cosmic Psychos: Blokes You Can Trust’ and ‘Bullet To The Head’ . This episode also features interviews with Jesse Eisenberg, Dave Franco, Sofia Coppola, Emily Watson, Dwayne Johnson and Mark Wahlberg. The boys also take a look at those actors who have managed to out do their other showbiz family members

Make sure you also listen to see how you can win tickets to a special screening of ‘All Superheroes Must Die‘.

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here

Warm Bodies

Summary: Zombies love people, especially their brains. But R (Nicholas Hoult) is different. He’s alive inside, unlike the hundreds of other grunting, drooling undead – all victims of a recent plague that drove the remaining survivors into a heavily guarded city. Now the Zombies roam about an airport terminal, searching for human prey and living in fear of the vicious Boneys, the next undead incarnation. One day, R and his best friend M lumber toward the city in search of food. There, R first sets his eyes on Julie (Teresa Palmer), a beautiful human.

Determined to save her – first from the other Zombies and then from the Boneys – R hides her in his home, a cluttered 747 aircraft. Julie is terrified, and R’s grunted assurances of “Not…eat” do little to calm her. But when R begins to act more human than Zombie, coming to her defense, refusing to eat human flesh, and even speaking in full sentences, Julie realizes that R is special.      After a few close calls with the Boneys, and with her father mounting an armed search for her, Julie realizes she can’t hide forever. So she sneaks back home, leaving R broken-hearted.

Desperate to see her, R decides to comb his hair, stand a little straighter, and impersonate a human long enough to get past the city guards. If only he can prove to the humans that Zombies can change, maybe R and Julie’s love might stand a chance. But with the rampaging Boneys heading toward the city and Julie’s father intent on killing R and his Zombie friends, the stage is set for an all-out battle between the living and the undead.      A genre-bending tale of love and transformation, Warm Bodies is a story about a boy who loves a girl… for more than just her body.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 11th April, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Jonathan Levine

Screenwriter: Jonathan Levine, Isaac Marion (novel)

Cast: Alec Bourgeois (Perry (11 Years Old), Rob Corddry (M), Jonathan Dubsky (Berg), Dawn Ford (Dr. Burke), Dave Franco (Perry), Cory Hardrict (Kevin), Nicholas Hoult (R), Genevieve Joly-Provost (Suzy), John Malkovich (Grigio), Quinn O’Neill (Emily), Teresa Palmer (Julie), Analeigh Tipton (Nora), Zavier Vaillancourt (Perry (6 Years Old)

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Warm Bodies’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘Warm Bodies’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Warm Bodies′: Check Episode #27 (available 11th April, 2013) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Warm Bodies’.

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating:Warm Bodies (2013) on IMDb