Tagged: Eddie Marsan

Still Life

Summary: For over 22 years, life for the unassuming John May has been his work for the local council in South London, finding the next of kin for those in his community who have passed away alone. But in this age of ‘efficiency’, John’s meticulousness and care is no longer deemed necessary, and he is abruptly made redundant. John is left with one assignment: a search for the relatives of an elderly neighbour, Billy Stoke.

As he journeys beyond London to piece together Billy’s past, John uncovers a life of mischief, misadventure, love and regret, most of all for an abandoned daughter, Kelly (the radiant Joanne Froggatt, Downton Abbey) whom John manages to locate. These two insular people are naturally drawn to each other, and as friendship blossoms, John’s outlook opens imperceptibly to life’s possibilities…

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th July, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK, Italy

Director: Uberto Pasolini

Screenwriter: Uberto Pasolini

Cast: Herbe Beardsall (Lucy), Andrew Buchan (Council Manager), Neil D’Souza (Shakthi), Karen Drury (Mary), Wayne Foskett (Garry), Deborah Frances-White (Miss Pilger), Joanna Froggatt (Kelly Stoke), Eddie Marsan (John May), Ciaran McIntyre (Jumbo), Kyla Wight (Beth)

Runtime: 92 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR STILL LIFE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Still Life review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #89

Stars(4)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Mrs. Brown’s Boys D’Movie review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #89

Stars(2.5)

David Griffiths:

Occasionally a film comes a long that is so strong that it makes you sit down and re-evaluate your own life. Still Life is one of those films, this isn’t the kind of film that you will walk out feeling on top of the world. No this is the kind of film that is likely to bring you down a little and you think deeply about what you have watched, but that doesn’t make this any lesser of a film, instead it does exactly the opposite.

Still Life’s main character John May (Eddie Marsan) lives a dull yet fulfilling life. While his personal life seems to be a black hole filled with no romance, no friends and the same boring meals day-in-and-day-out he finds a reason to live because of his job. John works for the local council helping to piece together the puzzle when somebody dies who seems to have no close relatives. However, his world comes crashing down when he is informed by his boss that his services are no longer needed and that his next case will be his final one.

Director Uberto Pasolini (who is mainly known for working as a producer on The Full Monty) overcomes a lot of obstacles to make Still Life a good film. First of which he manages to make one of the most boring men on the planet and likable character for the audience to watch. He sets John up in such a way that you not only feel sorry for him but also that you like him to the point that you want him to succeed. Pasolini is a visual director and it doesn’t take a myriad of writing for him to get his points across about John’s life, likewise he trusts his leading man to be able to us looks and sighs instead of language throughout the film and it works delightfully well. The introduction of some subtle black comedy also helps the audience from completely slipping into a full bout of depression.

Pasolini also seems to have been on a mission to make an anti-Hollywood film with Still Life. Yes he introduces a bit of a love interest for John with the introduction of Kelly Stoke (Joanne Froggatt) but is gifted enough to prevent this from ever becoming your full on Adam Sandler/Drew Barrymore style romantic comedy, and for that he deserves credit. But the proof that Pasolini wanted to make a film that went against the main grain is his ending. While not wanting to give too much away Still Life has an ending that you certainly don’t see coming but will stay with you a long time of the credits have dissolved.

The big allie that Pasolini had in making Still Life work was his leading man Eddie Marsan. Often Marsan is the comedy sidekick to bigger names in films like The World’s End, or just goes along for the ride in big blockbusters like Snow White & The Huntsmen and Jack The Giant Slayer but here Marsan once again reminds audiences that he is a strong character actor who truly deserves more leading roles. The morose look that Marsan wears throughout Still Life would have been taxing on any actor but he pulls it off well with a performance that deserves a lot more credit than it has received.

Still Life is one of those sleeper hits. It’s one of those films that you notice has just opened at the cinema but for some stupid reason you keep on putting off from going to see, then when you do see it you can’t stop talking about it with your friends. Still Life is melancholy and downright depressing in parts but it is also a film that will stick with you. Just be warned it is impossible to watch Still Life and not find yourself becoming emotionally involved or affected from it.

Stars(3.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Still Life (2013) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Still Life′: For our full Still Life review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #89. You can also check Dave’s review at The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

During The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Episode 43 the boys took a look at the most unlikable characters in cinema history – here are their lists.

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Dolores Umbridge

  • Darth Vader (David Prowse) – ‘Star Wars’ (1977)
  • Steve Stifler (Seann William Scott) – ‘American Pie’ (1999)
  • Cal Hockley (Billy Zane) – ‘Titanic’ (1997)
  • Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon) – ‘The Departed’ (2006)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Dolores Umbrige (Imelda Staunton) – ‘Harry Potter & The Order Of The Phoenix’ (2007)
  • Peter (Frank Giering) + Paul (Arno Frisch) – ‘Funny Games’ (1997)
  • Peter (Brady Corbet) + Paul (Michael Pitt) – ‘Funny Games’ (2007)
  • Mr. Harvey (Stanley Tucci) – ‘The Lovely Bones’ (2009)
  • Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson) – ‘Django Unchained’ (2012)
  • Begbie (Robert Carlyle) – ‘Trainspotting’ (1996)
  • Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale) ‘American Psycho’ (2000)
  • Sean Bateman (James Van Der Beek) ‘The Rules Of Attraction’ (2002)
  • Bill Sikes (Oliver Reed) – ‘Oliver!’ (1968)
  • Randall Boggs (Steve Buscemi) – ‘Monsters Inc.’ (2001)
  • Amon Goeth (Ralph Fiennes) – ‘Schindlers’ List’ (1993)
  • Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) – ‘Harry Potter Franchise’
  • Dennis Nedry (Wayne Knight) – Jurassic Park’ (1993)
  • Scar (Jeremy Irons) – ‘The Lion King’ (1994)
  • Kev (Hugo Weaving) – ‘Last Ride’ (2009)
  • Lou Ford (Casey Affleck) – ‘The Killer Inside Me’ (2010)

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Jeremy Renner - The Hurt Locker

  • Kev (Hugo Weaving) – ‘Last Ride’ (2009)
  • Begbie (Robert Carlyle) – ‘Trainspotting’ (1997)
  • Johnny Lawrence (William Zabka) – ‘The Karate Kid’ (1984)
  • Fred O’Bannon (Ben Affleck) – ‘Dazed And Confused’ (1993)
  • John Quincy Adams (Anthony Hopkins) – Amistad’ (1997)
  • Detective Sergeant Johnson (Sean Connery) – ‘The Offence’ (1972)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) – ‘The Social Network’ (2010)
  • Judd Raike (Karl Malen) – ‘Parrish’ (1961)
  • Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum) – ‘Jurassic Park’ (1993)
  • Shia LeBouf – Any movie he has made.
  • Sergeant First Class William James (Jeremy Renner) – ‘The Hurt Locker’ (2008)
  • John Bender (Judd Nelson) – ‘The Breakfast Club’ (1985)
  • Major Benson Payne (Damon Wayans) – ‘Major Payne’ (1995)
  • Happy Gilmore (Adam Sandler) – ‘Happy Gilmore’ (1996)
  • Johnny Quid (Toby Kebbell) – ‘RocknRolla’ (2008)
  • Juno (Ellen Page) – ‘Juno’ (2007)
  • Cereal (Matthew Lillard) – ‘Hackers’ (1995)
  • Leigh Anne Tuohy (Sandra Bullock) – ‘The Blind Side’ (2009)

 

GREG KING’S LIST

Jar Jar Binks

  • Col Nathan R. Jessup (Jack Nicholson) – ‘A Few Good Men’ (1992)
  • Trent (Steve Carell) – ‘The Way Way Back’ (2013)
  • Danny McBride (Danny McBride) – ‘This Is The End’ (2013)
  • Gny. Sgt. Hartman (R. Lee Ermey) – ‘Full Metal Jacket’ (1987)
  • Mr. Martin (R. Lee Ermey) – ‘Willard’ (2003)
  • Sgt. Fatso Judson (Ernst Borgnine) – ‘From Here To Eternity’ (1953)
  • Jar Jar Binks (Ahmed Best) – ‘Star Wars: Episode 1: The Phantom Menace’ (1999)
  • Ricky Bobby (Will Ferrell) – ‘Taladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby’ (2006)
  • Adam Sandler – Any movie he is in.
  • Ruby Rhod (Chris Tucker) – ‘The Fifth Element’ (1997)
  • Derek Zoolander (Ben Stiller) – ‘Zoolander’ (2001)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (Joaquin Phoenix) – ‘I’m Still Here’ (2010)
  • Napoleon Dynamite (Jon Heder) – ‘Napoleon Dynamite’ (2004)
  • Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman) – Rushmore’ (1998)
  • Steve Stifler (Seann William Scott) – ‘American Pie’ (1999)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Gary King (Simon Pegg) – ‘The World’s End’) (2013)
  • Mr. Yunioshi (Mickey Rooney) – ‘Breakfast At Tiffany’s’ (1961)
  • Gilbert Gottfried – any character
  • Kitai Raige (Jaden Smith) – ‘After Earth’ (2013)
  • Champ Kind (David Koechner) – ‘Anchorman: The Legend Of Ron Burgundy’ (2004)
  • Joe (Matthew McConnaughey) – ‘Killer Joe’ (2011)
  • Biff Tannen (Thomas F. Wilson) – ‘Back To The Future’ (1985)
  • Bob Oswald (Rory Kinnear) – ‘Broken’ (2012)

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Nurse Ratched

  • Jack Black – Everything he did early in his career
  • Begbie (Robert Carlyle) – ‘Trainspotting’ (1997)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Of The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Bogs Diamond (Mark Rolston) – ‘The Shawshank Redemption’ (1994)
  • Mrs. Carmody (Marcia Gay Harden) – The Mist’ (2007)
  • Percy Wetmore (Doug Hutchison) – ‘The Green Mile’ (1999)
  • Mick (Johnny Harris) – ‘This Is England ’86’ (2010)
  • James (Eddie Marsan) – ‘Tyrannosaur’ (2011)
  • Ace (Kiefer Sutherland) – ‘Stand By Me’ (1986)
  • Derek (Adam Scott) – ‘Step Brothers’ (2008)
  • Earline Fitzgerald (Margo Martindale) – ‘Million Dollar Baby’ (2004)
  • Dick Jones (Ronny Cox) – ‘RoboCop’ (1987)
  • Brad Wesley (Ben Gazzara) – Road House’ (1989)

The World's End

Summary: In The World’s End, 20 years after attempting an epic pub crawl, five childhood friends reunite when one of them becomes hellbent on trying the drinking marathon again. They are convinced to stage an encore by mate Gary King (Simon Pegg), a 40-year-old man trapped at the cigarette end of his teens, who drags his reluctant pals to their hometown and once again attempts to reach the fabled pub – The World’s End. As they attempt to reconcile the past and present, they realise the real struggle is for the future, not just theirs but humankind’s. Reaching The World’s End is the least of their worries.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 1st August, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Edgar Wright

Screenwriter: Simon Pegg, Edgar Wright

Cast: Zachary Bailess (Young Andy Knightley), David Bradley (Basil), Pierce Brosnan (Guy Shephard), Paddy Considine (Steven Prince), Martin Freeman (Oliver), Nick Frost (Andrew Knightley), Thomas Law (Young Gary King), Jasper Levine (Young Steven Prince), Eddie Marsan (Peter), Bill Nighy (The Network (voice)), Simon Pegg (Gary King), Rosamund Pike (Sam)

Runtime: 108 mins

Classification:MA15+

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘THE WORLD’S END’’:

David Griffiths:  Stars(2)

Please check Dave’s review of ‘The World’s End’ that is available on The Helium Entertainment Channel

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘The Way Way Back’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(2)

Please check Nicks’s review of ‘The Way Way Back’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #43

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2)

IMDB Rating:  The World's End (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Way Way Back′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #43 for more reviews of ‘The Way Way Back’.

Trailer:

The World's End

A new featurette has just been released for the forthcoming ‘The World’s End’

Five friends who reunite in an attempt to top their epic pub crawl from 20 years earlier unwittingly become humankind’s only hope for survival.

Cast:
Rosamund Pike, Simon Pegg, Martin Freeman, Bill Nighy, Pierce Brosnan, Eddie Marsan, Nick Frost, Paddy Considine

Director:
Edgar Wright

Jack The Giant Slayer

Summary: Jack the Giant Slayer tells the story of an ancient war that is reignited when a young farmhand unwittingly opens a gateway between our world and a fearsome race of giants. Unleashed on the Earth for the first time in centuries, the giants strive to reclaim the land they once lost, forcing the young man, Jack (Nicholas Hoult) into the battle of his life to stop them. Fighting for a kingdom, its people, and the love of a brave princess, he comes face to face with the unstoppable warriors he thought only existed in legend – and gets the chance to become a legend himself.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Bryan Singer

Screenwriter: Darren Lemke, Christopher McQuarrie, Dan Studney, David Dobkin (story)

Cast: Angus Barnett (Foe), Lee Boardman (Badger), Ewen Bremner (Wicke), Andrew Brooke (Fye), Ralph Brown (General Entin), Ben Daniels (Fumm), Warwick Davis (Old Hamm), Christopher Fairbank (Jack’s Uncle), Nicholas Hoult (Jack), Cornell John (Fee), Mingis Johnston (Bald), Simon Lowe (Monk), Eddie Marsan (Crawe), Ewan McGregor (Elmont), Ian McShane (King Brahmwell), Bill Nighy (General Fallon), Sydney Rawson (Young Isabelle), Joe E Salazar (Roddy), Craig Salisbury (Panto Erik The Great),  Michael Self (Young Jack), Eleanor Tomlinson (Isabelle), Stanley Tucci (Roderick), Tandi Wright (Queen)

Runtime: 114 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Jack The Giant Slayer’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘Rust & Bone’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Jack The Giant Slayer′: Check Episode #25 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Jack The Giant Slayer’. Subculture Media also have interviews with the cast of Jack The Giant Slayer available for you to listen to.

Subculture Media Interviews for ‘Jack The Giant Slayer’: Interviews with various members of the ‘Jack The Giant Slayer’ cast can be found here.

Rating: 3.5/5

IMDB Rating: Jack the Giant Slayer (2013) on IMDb