Tagged: Imelda Staunton

Pride

Summary: U.K. gay activists work to help miners during their lengthy strike of the National Union of Mineworkers in the summer of 1984.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: 4th March, 2015

Country: UK, France

Director: Matthew Warchus

Screenwriter: Stephen Beresford

Cast: Jack Baggs (Gary), Derek Barr (Brian), Jessie Cave (Zoe), Paddy Considine (Dai), Monica Dolan (Marion), Dyfan Dwyfor (Lee), Mary-Anne Dymond (Rowena), Sophie Evans (Debbie), Karina Fernandez (Stella), Matthew Flynn (Tony), Freddie Fox (Jeff), Johnny Gibbon (Johnny), Joseph Gilgun (Mike), Jessica Gunning (Sian), Nia Gwynne (Gail), Joshua Hill (Ray), Jan Leeming (herself), George MacKay (Joe), Faye Marsay (Steph), Laura Matthews (Tina), Rhodri Meilir (Martin), Jordan Metcalfe (Charlie), Bill Nighy (Cliff), Chris Overton (Reggie), Lisa Palfrey (Maureen), Bryan Parry (Kevin), Feargal Quinn (Jimmy Sommerville), Kyle Rees (Carl), Ben Schnetzer (Mark), Andrew Scott (Gethin), Lee Shepherd (Rhodri), Imelda Staunton (Hefina), Margaret Thatcher (herself), Russell Tovey (Tim), Menna Trussler (Gwen), Dominic West (Jonathan), Liz White (Margaret), Richard Whiteley (himself), Joseph Wilkins (Jason)

Runtime: 120 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR PRIDE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Harley Woods:

Pride is a film based in semi-recent history. The screenplay was written by Stephen Beresford and the film directed by Matthew Warchus.

The story revolves around the miners’ strike in Britain in 1984 and the persecution the mineworkers suffered at the hands of the Thatcher government and the police. Contrasting this is the gay rights movement in London and one gay activist group’s plan to take action and help out another disaffected group of people by raising funds for the mineworkers and their families.

The picture and the place-and-time are set instantly to recreate the Eighties and archive news footage shows us the situations going on with each of the main groups. To take us into this world we meet Joe (George MacKay), affectionately nicknamed “Bromley” after his hometown, on his twentieth birthday – which just happens to be gay pride day. Suddenly inspired to march he joins in with the gay pride activists, hoping to ‘blend in’. Instead, he gets thrust into the limelight, holding a sign for attention. He soon joins in gathering funds for the miners as established activist, Mark (Ben Schnetzer), takes up the cause. From there the LGSM (Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners) movement is born and we are thrust into the main story.

On his journey, as is paralleled by the main plot, Joe finds his identity, new friendships, belonging and a cause. His awkwardness echoes the awkwardness between the two antithetical communities as they band together.

Differing opinions within each group show the difficulty of the merger and of dealing with people’s uneducated phobias, but clever humour is used to lighten the tension and resolve issues in an entertaining fashion. A witty play on the stereotypes and expected ‘ignorance’ is used to effect to make things entertaining and take things out of predictable realms.

The personal stories of some of our characters show us the effects that the mineworkers’ situation and the fight for gay rights have on those affected. These human insights give us an emotional connection and draw us further into the plot. We see the fight for survival, the AIDS epidemic – the character of Jonathan Blake was the second-diagnosed person with HIV in London, but is still living strong to this day – self-identity, coming-out and acceptance by your family and those you love.

Gethin, our gay Welsh character, bridges the gap between the two worlds and adds a human expression with his feelings of being unable to return home after being rejected by his mother. As the two camps come together he is finally moved to take-part in the union and humour is used to make light of his awkwardness; breaking in a scene that shows how they are all growing comfortable with each other.

The human element is at the core of the story. We follow this in Joe’s first-gay-steps, his first kiss, his outing to his family… Conversely, we see Maureen’s (Lisa Palfrey) bigotry and how this affects her actions to further her own agenda and to shield her sons from something she has misunderstood. We see the desperation of the mining families in a scene where two of the characters butter bread for sandwiches that have no other fillings. The clever humour is used to show a serious situation in a very accessible way.

Detail has gone into design, set-dressing and wardrobe to set the period perfectly. The colour of the Eighties shapes the London scenes and the grey of the Welsh mining town of Onllwyn. The crazy colour of the period is nicely toned and selected in deliberate pallets in all aspects to keep the visuals pleasant. The grading of the colours are muted more at the start of the film and become bright and bold at the end, subliminally showing a ‘brighter future.’

The story shows the characters at their best and worst and what they take from it all, making for a very engaging and powerful story. We see how the story gets turned around at the end and how far the two communities have come to support each other. We see the power that comes from people coming together; even if not all major battles are won, the amazing feats of people uniting under a common cause has the power to change things, even in small ways and this has a compounding effect. We even get to glimpse the ‘changed hearts’ of Maureen’s sons are they are there to support the gay community at the end, having overcome their own misinformed cynicisms.

Exceptional performances from the whole cast brought the characters to life. Of note was Jessica Gunning as Sian who really ‘comes-out’ in her own right; taking what she has learnt to further herself and eventually became a member of parliament.

Stars(4.5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Pride (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Pride′: For our full Pride review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #103.

Trailer:

Maleficent

Summary: The “Sleeping Beauty” tale is told from the perspective of the villainous Maleficent and looks at the events that hardened her heart and drove her to curse young Princess Aurora.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 29th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK, USA

Director: Robert Stromberg

Screenwriter: Linda Woolverton, Charles Perrault (story), Jacob Grimm (story), Wilhelm Grimm (story), Erdmann Penner (story), Joe Rinaldi (story), Winston Hibler (story), Bill Peet (story), Ted Sears (story), Ralph Wright (story), Milt Banta (story)

Cast: Jackson Bews (Teenage Stefan), Charlotte Chatton (Aurora), Sharlto Copley (Stefan), Kenneth Cranham (King Henry), Elle Fanning (Aurora), Michael Higgins (Young Stefan), Angelina Jolie (Maleficent), Vivienne Jolie-Pitt (Aurora 5 Years Old), Lesley Manville (Flittle), Janet McTeer (Narrator (voice)), Isabelle Molloy (Young Maleficent), Hannah New (Princess Leila), Ella Purnell (Teenage Maleficent), Sam Riley (Diaval), Imelda Staunton (Knotgrass), Juno Temple (Thistletwit), Brenton Thwaites (Prince Phillip), Jermaine Tindell (Tactus), Eleanor Worthington-Cox (Aurora 8 Years Old)

Runtime: 97 mins

Classification: M

 

 

OUR MALEFICENT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Maleficent review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #81

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

The Hollywood obsession of rebooting famous fairytales continues with Disney’s Maleficent. The trend over the last few years has resulted in some good films such as Snow White & The Huntsman but also some very ordinary films, anybody else remember Red Riding Hood? Therefore as a film fan you find yourself approaching Maleficent with a little bit of hesitance. The good news is there is no reason to because Disney have released a film that deserves two thumbs up.

Technically Maleficent isn’t a reboot it’s simply telling the ‘other side’s’ story of the famous Sleeping Beauty fairytale. The film looks at Maleficent (Angelina Jolie – Kung-Fu Panda 2, The Tourist) aka the wicked witch who cursed the young Sleeping Beauty, Aurora (Elle Fanning – Low Down, Young Ones).

In Maleficent we see what led to those actions as she is left to protect her land from the advances of the greedy King Henry (Kenneth Cranham – The Legend Of Hercules, Closed Circuit) and the pain she if left with after her lover, Stefan (Sharlto Copley – Oldboy, Open Grave) cruelly turns his back on her. We also see her team up with Diaval (Sam Riley – The Dark Valley, On The Road) to try and get revenge on all at hand but her love for Aurora prevents her from being as ghastly as she would like to.

Director Robert Stromberg, who is a first time director but has worked in visual design on some of the world’s best known films and television shows over the years, is almost asked to do the impossible here – that is to make a character who has always been the villain to the audience become someone that film fan’s will warm to. To his credit, and thanks to some help from talented screenwriter Linda Woolverton (Alice In Wonderland, The Lion King), Stromberg manages to pull of this feat wonderfully well, all while creating a film that also looks amazing as well.

Stromberg pulls off his challenge so well that as an audience member you find yourself changing sides very, very easily. Suddenly Maleficent is the good guy and King Stefan is the character that you want to see suffer. Of course knowing that this has to be watched by children means that Stromberg does also bring in some comedic relief to break up the darkness and that mainly occurs with Aurora’s minders – the bumbling fairies (or is that pixies?) Flittle (Lesley Manville – Mr. Turner, The Christmas Candle), Knotgrass (Imelda Staunton – Pride, The Pirates! Band Of Misfits) and Thistletwit (Juno Temple – Horns, Lovelace). The fact that the film manages to make these characters entertaining and not annoying is a feat upon itself.

Maleficent is a film that also looks amazing. Stromberg has created mythical characters that wouldn’t have looked out of place in something like Pan’s Labyrinth and the special effects team has come on board to make the creatures come to life and look spectacular on the big screen. The battle scenes also show that Stromberg is a very visual director and doesn’t always hold back just because he knows that little eyes are watching.

Despite its brilliance though there are a couple of annoying things that occur during Maleficent. The annoying thing is they are so small and can only be put down to lazy filmmaking and screenwriting. Firstly it is never explained why Maleficent can do great feats of magic, including make a tree grow back a branch but can’t do a spell to give herself wings again, and then there is a fact that at one moment the Narrator (Janet McTeer – Hannah Ardent, The Woman In Black) is calling Flittle, Knotgrass and Thistletwit fairies and the next moment pixies. Surely somebody must have noticed that happening during the filmmaking process somewhere along the line.

You do have to feel a little sorry for Elle Fanning in Maleficent. She seems to float along playing Aurora, and while she is one of the heroes of the film is not really given much to work with, except for the direction of ‘look cute.’ No this is very much an Angelina Jolie film and boy does she step up to the plate. Jolie delivers a full range of acting emotions and more importantly makes Maleficent a likable character while she is still really the ‘villain’ at heart. While it is difficult to compare her work here to what she has done in films such as Girl, Interrupted this is certainly one of the better films in her career. A shout out must also be paid to Sam Riley who also seems to steal a lot of the screen time that he is given.

Dark yet beautiful Maleficent is certainly one of the surprise hits of 2014. While many may have dismissed this as a family film it ends up being a brilliantly made film that once again captures that magic that Disney has been known for in the past.

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating:  Maleficent (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Maleficent′: For our full Maleficent review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #81

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

During The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Episode 43 the boys took a look at the most unlikable characters in cinema history – here are their lists.

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Dolores Umbridge

  • Darth Vader (David Prowse) – ‘Star Wars’ (1977)
  • Steve Stifler (Seann William Scott) – ‘American Pie’ (1999)
  • Cal Hockley (Billy Zane) – ‘Titanic’ (1997)
  • Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon) – ‘The Departed’ (2006)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Dolores Umbrige (Imelda Staunton) – ‘Harry Potter & The Order Of The Phoenix’ (2007)
  • Peter (Frank Giering) + Paul (Arno Frisch) – ‘Funny Games’ (1997)
  • Peter (Brady Corbet) + Paul (Michael Pitt) – ‘Funny Games’ (2007)
  • Mr. Harvey (Stanley Tucci) – ‘The Lovely Bones’ (2009)
  • Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson) – ‘Django Unchained’ (2012)
  • Begbie (Robert Carlyle) – ‘Trainspotting’ (1996)
  • Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale) ‘American Psycho’ (2000)
  • Sean Bateman (James Van Der Beek) ‘The Rules Of Attraction’ (2002)
  • Bill Sikes (Oliver Reed) – ‘Oliver!’ (1968)
  • Randall Boggs (Steve Buscemi) – ‘Monsters Inc.’ (2001)
  • Amon Goeth (Ralph Fiennes) – ‘Schindlers’ List’ (1993)
  • Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) – ‘Harry Potter Franchise’
  • Dennis Nedry (Wayne Knight) – Jurassic Park’ (1993)
  • Scar (Jeremy Irons) – ‘The Lion King’ (1994)
  • Kev (Hugo Weaving) – ‘Last Ride’ (2009)
  • Lou Ford (Casey Affleck) – ‘The Killer Inside Me’ (2010)

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Jeremy Renner - The Hurt Locker

  • Kev (Hugo Weaving) – ‘Last Ride’ (2009)
  • Begbie (Robert Carlyle) – ‘Trainspotting’ (1997)
  • Johnny Lawrence (William Zabka) – ‘The Karate Kid’ (1984)
  • Fred O’Bannon (Ben Affleck) – ‘Dazed And Confused’ (1993)
  • John Quincy Adams (Anthony Hopkins) – Amistad’ (1997)
  • Detective Sergeant Johnson (Sean Connery) – ‘The Offence’ (1972)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) – ‘The Social Network’ (2010)
  • Judd Raike (Karl Malen) – ‘Parrish’ (1961)
  • Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum) – ‘Jurassic Park’ (1993)
  • Shia LeBouf – Any movie he has made.
  • Sergeant First Class William James (Jeremy Renner) – ‘The Hurt Locker’ (2008)
  • John Bender (Judd Nelson) – ‘The Breakfast Club’ (1985)
  • Major Benson Payne (Damon Wayans) – ‘Major Payne’ (1995)
  • Happy Gilmore (Adam Sandler) – ‘Happy Gilmore’ (1996)
  • Johnny Quid (Toby Kebbell) – ‘RocknRolla’ (2008)
  • Juno (Ellen Page) – ‘Juno’ (2007)
  • Cereal (Matthew Lillard) – ‘Hackers’ (1995)
  • Leigh Anne Tuohy (Sandra Bullock) – ‘The Blind Side’ (2009)

 

GREG KING’S LIST

Jar Jar Binks

  • Col Nathan R. Jessup (Jack Nicholson) – ‘A Few Good Men’ (1992)
  • Trent (Steve Carell) – ‘The Way Way Back’ (2013)
  • Danny McBride (Danny McBride) – ‘This Is The End’ (2013)
  • Gny. Sgt. Hartman (R. Lee Ermey) – ‘Full Metal Jacket’ (1987)
  • Mr. Martin (R. Lee Ermey) – ‘Willard’ (2003)
  • Sgt. Fatso Judson (Ernst Borgnine) – ‘From Here To Eternity’ (1953)
  • Jar Jar Binks (Ahmed Best) – ‘Star Wars: Episode 1: The Phantom Menace’ (1999)
  • Ricky Bobby (Will Ferrell) – ‘Taladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby’ (2006)
  • Adam Sandler – Any movie he is in.
  • Ruby Rhod (Chris Tucker) – ‘The Fifth Element’ (1997)
  • Derek Zoolander (Ben Stiller) – ‘Zoolander’ (2001)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (Joaquin Phoenix) – ‘I’m Still Here’ (2010)
  • Napoleon Dynamite (Jon Heder) – ‘Napoleon Dynamite’ (2004)
  • Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman) – Rushmore’ (1998)
  • Steve Stifler (Seann William Scott) – ‘American Pie’ (1999)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Gary King (Simon Pegg) – ‘The World’s End’) (2013)
  • Mr. Yunioshi (Mickey Rooney) – ‘Breakfast At Tiffany’s’ (1961)
  • Gilbert Gottfried – any character
  • Kitai Raige (Jaden Smith) – ‘After Earth’ (2013)
  • Champ Kind (David Koechner) – ‘Anchorman: The Legend Of Ron Burgundy’ (2004)
  • Joe (Matthew McConnaughey) – ‘Killer Joe’ (2011)
  • Biff Tannen (Thomas F. Wilson) – ‘Back To The Future’ (1985)
  • Bob Oswald (Rory Kinnear) – ‘Broken’ (2012)

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Nurse Ratched

  • Jack Black – Everything he did early in his career
  • Begbie (Robert Carlyle) – ‘Trainspotting’ (1997)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Of The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Bogs Diamond (Mark Rolston) – ‘The Shawshank Redemption’ (1994)
  • Mrs. Carmody (Marcia Gay Harden) – The Mist’ (2007)
  • Percy Wetmore (Doug Hutchison) – ‘The Green Mile’ (1999)
  • Mick (Johnny Harris) – ‘This Is England ’86’ (2010)
  • James (Eddie Marsan) – ‘Tyrannosaur’ (2011)
  • Ace (Kiefer Sutherland) – ‘Stand By Me’ (1986)
  • Derek (Adam Scott) – ‘Step Brothers’ (2008)
  • Earline Fitzgerald (Margo Martindale) – ‘Million Dollar Baby’ (2004)
  • Dick Jones (Ronny Cox) – ‘RoboCop’ (1987)
  • Brad Wesley (Ben Gazzara) – Road House’ (1989)