Tagged: John Oritz

Summary: After the Vietnam war, a team of scientists explores an uncharted island in the Pacific, venturing into the domain of the mighty Kong, and must fight to escape a primal Eden.

Year: 2017

Australian Cinema Release Date: 10th March 2017

Australian DVD Release Date: 19th July 2017

Country: United States, China

Director: Jordan Vogt-Roberts

Screenwriter: Max Borenstein, Derek Connolly, Dan Gilroy, John Gatins (story), Merian C. Cooper (characters), Edgar Wallace (characters)

Cast: Will Brittain (Young Marlow/Marlow’s Son), James Michael Connor (General Ward (voice), Eugene Cordero (Reles), James Edward Flynn (Sgt. Dren), John Goodman (Bill Randa), Corey Hawkins (Houston Brooks), Tom Hiddleston (James Conrad), Mark Evan Jackson (Landsat Steve), Samuel L. Jackson (Preston Packard), Richard Jenkins (Senator Willis), Tian Jing (San), Rachel Joseph (Iwi), Toby Kebbell (Jack Chapman/Kong), Brie Larson (Mason Weaver), Thomas Mann (Slivko), Thomas Middleditch (Jerry (voice)), Jason Mitchell (Mills), Miyavi (Gunpei Ikari), Terry Notary (Kong), John Oritz (Victor Nieves), Allen Rachel (Secretary O’Brien), John C. Reilly (Hank Marlow), Shea Whigham (Cole)

Runtime: 118 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR KONG: SKULL ISLAND REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Kyle McGrath’s Kong: Skull Island Review:

The second film in Legendary Pictures “MonsterVerse” Kong: Skull Island is the story of a team of soldiers, scientists and explorers who at the end of the Vietnam war set off to an uncharted island in the Pacific. Almost immediately they encounter the wrath of the mighty King Kong who destroying their military helicopters leave them stranded on Skull Island. The survivors must traverse this unknown land to reach their originally planned evacuation point completely unaware that there are things on this island much worse than a 100 foot tall monkey.
I thoroughly enjoyed 2014’s Godzilla. While I thought the movie had some issues I feel it captured the perfect tone and representation of the titular King of the Monsters. I had heard about Kong: Skull Island from one source that it didn’t take itself too seriously and then from another that it took itself too seriously. After seeing the film I think it’s a mixture of both and it isn’t alway pretty.
From the beginning the filmmakers attempts to make “Apocalypse Now but with monsters” comes off as comedic. The opening scene which itself is set at the height of WW2 as both a US and Japanese soldier crash land on the island and duke it out before being interrupted by Kong feels more like a parody than anything. I was seriously expecting it to turn out to be “golden age of Hollywood” crew making some schlocky movie as a reference to the storylines of other “King Kong” films before being attacked. But no, this is the tone of the movie, rather than awe or drama I’m expecting a punchline and usually getting one from one of the movie’s many comedy relief moments. At a moment of high tension as Kong is about to eat some unfortunate soldier it jump cuts to a man biting into a sandwich. This is comedy stuff and drives a steamroller through any tension the film has built up and turns it into a joke.
The other serious moments, or attempts at serious moments come from the characters mostly, all of whom are non entities. There are simply way too many characters in this movie and not enough plot to go around to flesh them all out in 2 hours. One of the shortcomings of Peter Jackson’s King Kong (2005) was the amount of time early on spent on supporting characters who either weren’t going to make it or weren’t going to be relevant at all by the halfway point.
Their stories felt genuine at least however. Here every other character has some monologue about their past. They talk about writing letters to their mama back home, or their newborn son they’ve never seen or they reminisce about some village they obliterated in ‘nam. All of it feels so melodramatic and ridiculous, again like it came from a parody film such as Black Dynamite and it comes from characters who probably shouldn’t be in the movie at all as their only purpose is to be fodder for some beastie or in some cases not even that. I know it’s complaining about “forced diversity” or “trying to appeal to the Chinese audience” in movies is low hanging fruit but it helps if in a movie your writers give a black guy and a Chinese girl something more substantial to do than just exist, follow the main characters around and talk to each other every now and then to remind us they’re there.
All of this damages the movie. I don’t care about the plot or Samuel L Jackson’s Colonel Kurtz-surrogate insane military commander because so much screen time is dedicated to redundancies. I would say it feels like a movie that has had 30 minutes of story cut out of it if it wasn’t for the low quality of what IS in the movie telling me otherwise.
Now while the actual monster on monster action fares much better and let’s be honest that’s what people came to see even that I found to be harmed by the need at comedy relief. We’re told about “Skull Crawlers”, the REAL threat on the island and what our hero Kong is up against, in a scene which needs to be interrupted for some jokes from long marooned soldier John C. Reilly told in exactly such a fashion that you’d expect from him. The result is on par with a Bond villain slipping on a banana peel in the middle of his master plan speech to James.
That said fans of the genre may get more out of this movie than out of Godzilla 2014. Purely from the fact that while in that film the filmmakers wished to hide the monsters from us as much as possible, here they can’t seem to wait to show it to us.
The film is what it is, a monster themed popcorn movie with cheesy comedy, wafer thin characters and story and 100 foot ape. I do believe that much more could have been done with it however if the filmmakers just knew more what tone they wished to take and story they wanted to tell. The film is tries to mix serious moments with comedy but comes off more like Hot Shots 2 than Mash.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:  

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Kong: Skull Island (2017) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Kong: Skull Island Reviews: N/A

 

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘My Old Lady’, ‘The Drop,’ ‘Let’s Be Cops,’ ‘The Mule,’  and ‘Winter Sleep′ . This episode also contains an interviews with John Oritz, Jake Johnson, Nina Dobrev and Rebecca McLean (who tells us everything we need to know a great new film initiative for indigenous Australian which can be found at www.yarnin.net).

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Silver Linings Playbook

Summary: Life doesn’t always go according to plan…Pat Solatano (Bradley Cooper) has lost everything — his house, his job, and his wife. He now finds himself living back with his mother (Jacki Weaver) and father (Robert DeNiro) after spending eight months in a state institution on a plea bargain. Pat is determined to rebuild his life, remain positive and reunite with his wife, despite the challenging circu…mstances of their separation. All Pat’s parents want is for him to get back on his feet – and to share their family’s obsession with the Philadelphia Eagles football team. When Pat meets Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), a mysterious girl with problems of her own, things get complicated. Tiffany offers to help Pat reconnect with his wife, but only if he’ll do something very important for her in return. As their deal plays out, an unexpected bond begins to form between them, and silver linings appear in both of their lives.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 31st January, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: David O. Russell

Screenwriter: David O. Russell, Matthew Quick (novel)

Cast: Richard Adams (Ramon), Ted Barba (Doug Culpepper), Fritz Blacnchette (Fritzy), Regina Boies (Regina), Brea Bree (Nikki), Phillip Chorba (Jordie), Bradley Cooper (Pat), Robert De Niro (Pat Sr.), Vaughn Goland (Robert), Tiffany E. Green (Tanya), Paul Herman (Randy), Anupam Kher (Dr. Cliff Patel), Jennifer Lawrence (Tiffany), Anthony Lawton (Dr. Timbers), Patsy Meck (Nancy), Dash Mihok (Officer Keogh), John Oritz (Ronnie), Jeff Reim (Jeffrey), Matthew Russell (Ricky D’Angelo), Julia Stiles (Veronica), Chris Tucker (Danny), Jacki Weaver (Dolores), Shea Whigham (Jake)

Runtime: 122 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Silver Linings Playbook’ Review: 

It’s funny how Oscar Buzz can win some people over so quickly. ‘Silver Linings Playbook’ has come in for some deserved Oscar nominations but calling it ‘film of the year’ is a little bit of a stretch. Yes this is one romantic film that has the right mix of drama and comedy (even better is the fact it’s comedy that will make you laugh) and the acting is out of this world, but at the end of the day it’s script is seriously predictable, so much so that you’ll be able to predict the ending from the start of the film.

Based on a novel by Matthew Quick, ‘Silver Linings Playbook’ begins with Pat (Bradley Cooper – The Place Beyond The Pines, Hit And Run) being picked up from a mental hospital by his mother, Dolores (Jacki Weaver – The Five Year Engagement, Summer Coda). It turns out that he was placed in the hospital by the court after he viciously bashed a man who was having an affair with his wife, Nikki (Brea Bee – TV’S General Hospital, TV’S Breaking In).

However, the news that Pat is out of hospital doesn’t exactly thrill his father, Pat Snr. (Robert De Niro – Freelancers, Being Flynn) who believes that Pat may not be ready to be back in society. At first Pat does all he can to break his restraining order and tries to see Nikki but after being picked up by Officer Keogh (Dash Mihok – 2nd Serve, TV’S Greetings From Home) a couple of times and because of advice from his doctor Dr Cliff Patel (Anupam Kher – Midnight’s Children, Jab Tak Hai Jaan) Pat decides that while he does still want to end up with Nikki but is going to have to work slowly at it so he can show her that he has changed.

Then his life changes forever when his friends Ronnie (John Oritz – Jack Goes Boating, TV’S Luck) and Veronica (Julia Stiles – The Makeover, Between Us) introduce him to the damaged Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence – House At The End Of The Street, The Hunger Games) and while many feel they are bad for each other they soon form a strong bond that the others, aside from Danny (Chris Tucker – Rush Hour 3, Rush Hour 2), just don’t seem to understand.

Normally a film’s good script can make bad actors look good, but this time around it is a string of good acting performances that make a predictable script a worthy watch. It’s a shame that David O’ Russell’s (The Fighter, I Heart Huckabees) script is easy to predict from the get go because the script works on so many other levels – it gives a great insight into mental illness, has wonderful relationships between most of the characters and provides a few laughs along the way.

But the best thing about ‘Silver Linings Playbook’ are the remarkable performances of its key cast. Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence both show that they are most remarkable talents that are well and truly above the franchises that have made them famous while Robert De Niro also puts in one of his best performances for years.

‘Silver Linings Playbook’ also helps out some of Hollywood’s fringe dwelling actors to show their worth as well. Jacki Weaver is absolutely sensational and does Australia proud while Chris Tucker reminds Hollywood that he can be a talented actor when given the right script to work with again.

‘Silver Linings Playbook’ may be a little predictable but it is still an enjoyable journey and should certainly be classed as a must see.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Silver Linings Playbook′: Check Episode #18 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Silver Linings Playbook’. Dave’s other review of ‘Silver Linings Playbook’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating: Silver Linings Playbook (2012) on IMDb