Tagged: Johnny Bautista

A Million Ways To Die InThe West 2

Summary: As a cowardly farmer begins to fall for the mysterious new woman in town, he must put his new-found courage to the test when her husband, a notorious gun-slinger, announces his arrival.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 29th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Seth MacFarlane

Screenwriter: Seth MacFarlane, Alec Sulkin, Wellesley Wild

Cast: John Aylward (Pastor Wilson), Preston Bailey (Young Albert), Johnny Bautista (Carl), Alex Borstein (Millie), Amick Byram (Marcus Thornton), Ardy Brent Carlson (Cowboy Ardy), Jean Effron (Elsie Stark), Jamie Foxx (Django), Ralph Garman (Dan), Gilbert Gottfried (Abraham Lincoln), Christopher Hagen (George Stark), Neil Patrick Harris (Foy), Evan Jones (Lewis), Rex Linn (Sheriff/Narrator), Christopher Lloyd (Doc Brown), Seth MacFarlane (Albert), Ewan McGregor (Cowboy At Fair), Aaron McPherson (Ben), Liam Neeson (Clinch), Jay Patterson (Doctor Harper), Ryan Reynolds (Man Killed By Clinch In Bar), Giovanni Ribisi (Edward), Brett Rickaby (Charlie Blanche), Mike A. Salazar (6-Year-Old-Albert), Amanda Seyfried (Louise), Sarah Silverman (Ruth), Patrick Stewart (Dream Voice), Wes Studi (Cochise), Charlize Theron (Anna), Debbie Waters (Mother Of James Addison)

Runtime: 116 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s A Million Ways To Die In The West review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #81

Stars(3)

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s A Million Ways To Die In The West review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

Television fans worldwide had always known that Seth MacFarlane was a comedy genius. His show-pony, the hilarious Family Guy had revealed a dark sense of humor that wasn’t always politically correct but was always worth a laugh or two. Then came Ted, a film that centered around a foul-mouthed, alcoholic, drug abusing bear, a film that also proved that Mr MacFarlane’s comedic talents could also transfer to the big screen.

Now comes MacFarlane’s real test, that difficult second film… very often the film that will make or break a filmmaker. Just to raise the bar even higher MacFarlane has decided the tough task of making a comedy western, a genre that works well in the shape of Blazing Saddles but has also delivered some severe duds along the way. Besides that he has also decided to star, direct, write and produce the whole shebang. The good news for his fans though is he delivers the goods.

MacFarlane (Movie 43, Ted) plays Albert, a kind-hearted sheep farmer who is a bit of a loser when it comes to life. He spends most of his time concerned at the million or so ways that the old west can kill you while also seemingly fail at being a sheep farmer considering his sheep are normally found wondering all around the town he calls home.

To add to his loser status he suddenly finds himself dumped by his girlfriend, Louise (Amanda Seyfried – Epic, The Big Wedding) who decides that she is better suited the much more successful and moustached Foy (Neil Patrick Harris – Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2, The Smurfs 2). Worse still is the fact that Foy has challenged Albert to a gun duel and despite his surroundings he has never fired a gun before in his life.

Enter Anna (Charlize Theron – Prometheus, Snow White And The Huntsman) the attractive gun-slinger who rides into town and takes an interest liking to Albert. She is more than happy to train him for the gun fight and along the way they learn that they also share the same interests… and sense of the humor. The one thing that she fails to tell him though is that she is married to, Clinch (Liam Neeson – The Lego Movie, Non-Stop), a tough, violent outlaw who is not impressed when he finds about Anna and Albert.

While A Million Ways To Die In The West does ultimately work it is on occasions hit and miss… although the hits do outweigh the misses. The typical MacFarlane humour is there that his fans have come to know and love, the cheap shots at everyday life and the occasional black humour moment that makes you laugh despite the fact that you feel it is not a topic that you should be laughing at. To his credit this type of humour works throughout the film but at times it also feels that MacFarlane works too hard to get his comedic point across. For example do we really need to see Foy kick over a hat full of diarrhoea to get the joke, or do we need a close-up of a sheep penis to find the fact the sheep relieves itself on Albert hilarious?

Then there are the parts of the film that work amazingly well. Albert is set up as a character that you are going to like and while some of the characters, such as Clinch, could be described as clichés there are interesting peripheral characters such as Edward (Giovanni Ribisi – Gangster Squad, Ted) and Ruth (Sarah Silverman – Gravy, TV’S Louie), a Christian couple that don’t have sex before marriage despite the fact that she works as a prostitute. It’s these kinds of side stories that certainly keeps the audience focussed on the film and laughing throughout.

When it comes to the acting side of A Million Ways To Die In The West a few of the cast get really smooth runs. Liam Neeson plays Clinch well but it feels like he is in cruise control while at times it almost feels like Charlize Theron is playing herself. Sarah Silverman, Giovanni Ribisi and Neil Patrick Harris all nail their comedic timing, while MacFarlane has shown that he is a good actor when he steps in front of the camera. Hopefully we see him do more of that in the future and not just concentrate on voice work.

A Million Ways To Die In The West is not the kind of comedy that will appeal to everybody, some of the jokes may go into some people’s ‘too crass’ pile, but for others this is going to be the kind of film that you will get laughs at throughout. Maybe not as good as Blazing Saddles but still a worthwhile comedy with a good romantic subplot.

Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: A Million Ways to Die in the West (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘A Million Ways To Die In The West′: For our full A Million Ways To Die In The West review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #81

Trailer:

Transcendence

Summary: A terminally ill scientist downloads his mind into a computer. This grants him power beyond his wildest dreams, and soon he becomes unstoppable.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th April, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK, China, USA

Director: Wally Pfister

Screenwriter: Jack Paglen

Cast: Johnny Bautista (Scott), Xander Berkeley (Dr Thomas Casey), Paul Bettany (Max Waters), Fernando Chien (Heng), Clifton Collins Jnr. (Martin), Johnny Depp (Dr. Will Caster), Morgan Freeman (Joseph Tagger), Lukas Haas (James Thomas), Rebecca Hall (Evelyn Caster), Corey Hardrict (Joel Edmund), Cole Hauser (Colonel Stevens), Falk Hentschel (Bob), Wallace Langham (Dr. Strauss), Steven Liu (Chiu), Kate Mara (Bree), Cillian Murphy (Agent Buchanan), Akshay Patel (James), Luce Rains (Roger), Josh Stewart (Paul)

Runtime: 119 mins

Classification: M

OUR TRANSCENDENCE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s Transcendence review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #77

Stars(1)

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Transcendence review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(2)

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Transcendence review on Southern FM

Stars(2.5)

David Griffiths:

Transendence is one of those films that a first time director can only dream about being at the helm at for their debut. Just think about it, it’s an intriguing very modern story and then you find out that the likes of Johnny Depp, Morgan Freeman and Paul Bettany are queuing up for roles. It is no secret that the true cinemaphiles have been waiting for the day that cinematographer Wally Pfister steps up to the director’s seat. After all this is a man who has worked on some of the most iconic films of the modern age – films like Memento, Insomnia, Inception and The Dark Knight trilogy. Pfister has more than done his time as the ‘apprentice’ and when his mentor Christopher Nolan decided to pass on the Transendence project he was the perfect man for the job, but sadly he is let down by a script that never really gave this film a fighting chance.

The film takes it audience deep into the world of artificial intelligence by following Dr. Will Caster (Johnny Depp – Lucky Them, The Lone Ranger), his wife Evelyn (Rebecca Hall – A Promise, Closed Circuit) and his co-worker Max Waters (Paul Bettany – Iron Man 3, Blood). The together the three of them have been taking the science world by storm as they come closer to closer in bridging the gap between computers and humans.

While there work has impressed rivals such as Joseph Tagger (Morgan Freeman – The Lego Movie, Last Vegas) it has also warranted the attention of a renegade group of vigilantes, which includes Bree (Kate Mara – Deadfall, TV’S House Of Cards), who believe that science is going too far. The result is that one of these group members guns down Will with a radioactive bullet. Evelyn and Max then work hard to bring Will online before he dies while Agent Buchanan (Cillian Murphy – Aloft, The Dark Knight Rises) tries to hunt down those responsible.

The second half of the film that takes a completely different tack. With Will online and working with Evelyn, Max has now teamed up with the vigilantes and believes the work is evil and needs to be stopped. Together with Agent Buchanan and Joseph Tagger they all work at a way to stop Will from taking over the world.

If that synopsis sounds ridiculous then it goes part of the way of explaining just how hard it is to watch Transcendence. The film starts well enough but by the time the lone gunman guns down Will with a radioactive bullet rather than just simply killing him you begin to realise that this is a film that jumps the shark at every possible chance.

At a glance Jack Paglen’s screenplay seems intelligent but after giving the film much thought you soon begin to realise that the plot makes no sense at all and that he has simply tried to use techno babble throughout, that actually makes no sense. Honestly at times it does seem like the actors have no idea what they are reading at all.

Then there is the plausibility of what actually happens. Nothing ever seems to be fully explained, not even simple things such as Max’s defection to ‘the other side.’ One moment he is kidnapped and the next moment he is working with the group, what was it that he was shown that made him change his mind, or was it just simply a case of Stockholm Syndrome… we don’t know because we are never told. Paglen can’t even work out whether he is for or against such technology at all, this is evident by the fact that the film just seems to skirt around the edges and never make a serious stance either way.

Even the top notch cast here cannot save Transcendence. Johnny Depp once again shows that when he is away from his Pirates Of The Caribbean his lack of acting ability is evident for all to see while the likes of Cillian Murphy, Paul Bettany and Morgan Freeman are simply wasted in their roles. In fact you can only wonder why the three of them even decided to sign on for the film in the first place. The only cast member who does get a chance to show anything at all is Rebecca Hall, but then even she isn’t really a standout.

Transcendence will go down as one of the biggest cinema failures of 2014, and rightfully so. The wishy-washy script makes for a dull watch that even seemed to bore its cast.

Stars(2)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2)

IMDB Rating: Transcendence (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Transcendence′: Please check our full Transcendence review that aired on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #77

Trailer:

Lone Survivor

Summary: Marcus Luttrell and his team set out on a mission to capture/kill al Qaeda leader Ahmad Shahd in late June 2005. The team are left to fight for their lives in one of the most valiant efforts of modern warfare.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 20th February, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Peter Berg

Screenwriter: Peter Berg, Marcus Luttrell (book), Patrick Robinson (book)

Cast: Yousuf Azami (Shah), Eric Bana (Erik Kristensen), Johnny Bautista (Lt. Edwards), Dan Bilzerian (Healy), Kurt Carlson (Captain Lovas), Paul Craig (‘EOD’ Paul),  Jerry Ferrara (Hasselert), Ben Foster (Matt ‘Axe’ Axelson), Daniel Fulcoly (Lt. Andrews), Michael P. Herrman (Wallace), Emile Hirsch (Danny Dietz), Joh Hocker (Hocker), Taylor Kitsch (Michael Murphy), Robert Loerke (Captain Jacoby), Alexander Ludwig (Shane Patton), Zabiullah Mirzai (Zabi), Henry Penzi (Penzi), Sammy Sheik (Taraq), Ali Suliman (Gulab), Rich Ting (James Suh), Mark Wahlberg (Marcus Luttrell)

Runtime: 121 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR LONE SURVIVOR REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(3)

Please check Adam’s Lone Survivor review of that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #68

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s Lone Survivor review of that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

David Griffiths:

War films are a dime-a-dozen… bad war films are even more common. It’s for that reason that is okay to be a little nervous when approaching Lone Survivor. Even the fact that it has a known actor like Mark Wahlberg in it doesn’t make necessarily a good film either… after all the man formerly known as Marky Mark has delivered some pretty bad turds over the years. Then there is the Peter Berg factor, yes Berg has shown over the years that he can create some masterpieces, just as he did with Friday Night Lights, but then he was also the man responsible for Battleship.

Luckily for movie fans out there Lone Survivor falls into the realm of good war films. So good in fact that it deserves to be mentioned alongside films such as The Hurt Locker and Black Hawk Down. Yes Peter Berg served his time with the studio and worked on Battleship and has now once again been allowed to show the world what a fine filmmaker he really is.

The film itself is based on actual events that happened to Marcus Luttrell (Mark Wahlberg) during a daring raid in Afghanistan to capture notorious Taliban leader Ahmed Shah (Yousuf Azami). Soon Luttrell’s group, which also contains Michael Murphy (Taylor Kitsch) and Matt Axelson (Ben Foster) find themselves deep under enemy fire after having to make a huge moral call. Worse still is the fact that they are cut off by their leader, Erik Kristensen (Eric Bana) as their communications have all gone down.

There is little doubt that this is film is made ten times better under the direction of Peter Berg. Just like he did with Friday Night Lights Berg makes Lone Survivor feel like you are watching a documentary. The dialogue was his script his natural and just because he has a big name like Eric Bana in a role doesn’t mean that Berg decides to give his A-lister any extra on screen.

Likewise Berg doesn’t hold back on the violence in this film. The film is set on the battlefield and it is obvious that Berg not only wants his audience to see that the men involved in this mission were not only heroes but he also wants people to realise just how tough it is for men and women on the front line. Not only does he show this with some very confronting war violence but also by some extremely intense scenes that show the moral decisions that soldiers have to make while going about their jobs.

In fact the highlight of Lone Survivor is the scene where Luttrell and co are faced with a very big ethical dilemma. Do they shoot dead some unarmed young Afghanis or do what the law says and let them go, knowing full well that the latter option is likely to bring even more repercussions for the soldiers. As the soldiers discuss what is best to do Berg heightens the tension to a level that most filmmakers can only dream about achieving.

Lone Survivor really isn’t a film about the actors in it, which is made obvious by the fact that an actor of the calibre of Eric Bana is in a pretty much ‘blink and you’ll miss him’ role while the likes of Ben Foster and Emile Hirsch are also in restricted roles. To his credit Mark Wahlberg delivers even when some of the scenes seem to be above his usual acting talent, while Taylor Kitsch again silences his critics with a worthy performance as well.

This is one film that is certainly a gripping, yet also very tough watch. The violence is unrelenting but Peter Berg does what he sets out to do and that is show the audience just how brave the men involved in this raid were. Lone Survivor is one of the finest war movies you will ever see.

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:  Lone Survivor (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Lone Survivor′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #68 for our full Lone Survivor review.

Trailer: