Tagged: Judith Lucy

Today the voting lines open in a call to the nation to find the top 3 Australian feature films – fiction and documentary – of all time.  The audience-curated feature films #YOUMUSTSEE will screen at the Adelaide Film Festival in October in a celebration of Australian cinema. 

The #YOUMUSTSEE campaign calls on audiences to celebrate, honour and acknowledge their favourite Australian screen stories and supports the current #MakeitAustralian campaign which throws the light on building a sustainable national screen industry.

One of the five ‘faces’ of the 2018 Festival campaign, South Australian actress Natasha Wanganeen, has Rabbit Proof Fence, Walkabout and Sweet Country on her list.  David Stratton rates Newsfront, Gallipoli and Blessed top of his list while Margaret Pomeranz says the Aussie films #youmustsee are Samson & Delilah, Beneath Clouds and The Babadook 

Are you like Hugo Weaving, Maddie Parry and Yolanda Ramke with Ten Canoes on your list? Chopper makes the cut for Jason “Jabba” Davis, Adam Zwar, Anna Broinowski and Mark Leonard Winter while Strictly Ballroom sparkles for Melanie VallejoBrendan Maclean, Judith Lucy and Toronto Film Festival’s International Programmer Jane Schoettle.  

Warwick Thornton recommends Autoluminescent: Rowland S. Howardwhile Tilda Cobham-Hervey and Samantha Lang include Somersault in their top 3 and The Dressmaker features for Sharon JohalThe Castle is up there for Lehmo, 7 News Adelaide’s Jane Doyle, youtube sensation Ozzy Man and Spear producer John Harvey

But it is back to 1919 for Mad Max director Dr George Miller with The Sentimental Bloke. Have your say and tell us your top 3 Australian films #youmustsee! 

Artistic Director of Adelaide Film Festival Amanda Duthie said “This campaign should excite debate and discussion of the Australian screen stories that had an impact as a child, a teenager, or older, whether it was the comedies, the drama, the action or the revelation of a true story told in documentary or fiction form.  Was it a film where you recognised yourself? Or you learnt from a culture not of your own? 

#YOUMUSTSEE invites you to come on this adventure of discovery. We encourage you to think on the Australian films made over the last 112 years and through your vote, gift them to new audiences. Vote because you loved it, it moved you, or you cannot forget the impression it left on you.  

The Australian screen industry is a passionate factory of dreams created for audiences. In an industry landscape where we are fighting to create more Australian production, it is more important than ever that we encourage our audiences to acknowledge Australian screen stories and keep the industry thriving.”

ADL Film Fest is already known as a champion of Australian screen works (feature films and documentaries, shorts, VR, moving image and more) and was the first Australian film festival to invest in film production through the groundbreaking ADL Film Fest FUND resulting in over 100 projects to date.  Become a champion too and vote for Australian screen stories #YOUMUSTSEE at this year’s Adelaide Film Festival.

 

Voting closes Monday, 30 July, 2018. Need some inspiration

 

To vote: go to adelaidefilmfestival.org

Summary:It s 1968, and four young, talented Australian aboriginal girls learn about love, friendship and war when their all girl group the sapphires entertain the us troops in Vietnam.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 9th August, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 7th December, 2012

Country: Australia

Director: Wayne Blair

Screenwriter: Tony Briggs, Keith Thompson

Cast: Merelyn Adamson (Major Wicks), Tammy Anderson (Evelyn), Don Battee (Myron Ritchie), Kylie Belling (Geraldine), Nioka Brennan (Young Kay), Carlin Briggs (Young Jimmy), Eko Darville (Hendo), Martin Farrugia (Max), Gregory J. Fryer (Selwyn), Georgina Haig (Glynnis), Annette Hodgson (Noelene), Tory Kittles (Robby), Tanika Lonesborough (Young Gail), Judith Lucy (Merle), Miah Madden (Young Julie), Deborah Mailman (Gail), Jessica Mauboy (Julie), Wayne McDaniel (Lou McGarrick), Amy Miller-Porter (Vera), Ava Jean Miller-Porter (Young Cynthia), Rhys Muldoon (Uncle Ed), Koby Murray (Baby Hartley), Lynette Narkle (Nanny Theresa), Chris O’Dowd (Dave), Hunter Page-Lochard (Steve Kayne), T.J. Power (Lt. Jenson), Ben Rodgers (Fish), Jake Ryan (Cochese), Jasper Sarkodee (Pinky), Shari Sebbens (Kay), Miranda Tapsell (Cynthia), Tom Whitechurch (Young Tommy), Cleave Williams (Duggie), Meyne Wyatt (Jimmy Middleton)

Runtime: 103 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Sapphires’ Review:

Red Dog started the ball rolling now it seems that other filmmakers have realised that not all Australian films have to be about dark, depressing topics. Certainly director, Wayne Blair (TV’S Lockie Leonard & Redfern Now) has realised that as his feature film directional debut, The Sapphires is an uplifting tale that is guaranteed to please any audience.

Based on real events The Sapphires is about three Aboriginal sisters, Gail (Deborah Mailman – Mabo, TV’S Offspring), Julie (Jessica Mauboy – Bran Nue Dae, TV’S Underbelly) and Cynthia (Miranda Tapsell – Mabo, TV’S Magical Tales) who dream about escaping the Aboriginal mission they call home and making it big as singers.

The dream seems fair fetched as they live in a racist outback town but when failed musician Dave (Chris O’Dowd – Friends With Kids, Bridesmaids) he decides to manage them, patch up differences with their cousin, Kay (Shari Sebbens – Violet) and then help them win a competition that will see them perform for the troops in Vietnam.

Thanks to a brilliant screenplay The Sapphires is able to provide the audience with a variety of comedy, drama and music. The film does go into some pretty deep subjects such as racism and tribal acceptance yet never once do you feel that the message is completely in your face.

With The Sapphires Wayne Blair also announces himself as one of Australia’s most promising directors. Together with cinematographer Warwick Thornton (who directed the brilliant Samson & Delilah) he makes this film look stunning on the big screen. Credit must be paid to both of them for making the Vietnam war scenes look so realistic despite a small budget.

The film does have some flaws, at times the story and some of the acting verge on being weak, but this is largely overshadowed by an amazing soundtrack and some brilliant performances by the films leads. Deborah Mailman again shows why she is one of Australia’s finest actors while Chris O’Dowd mixes comedy and drama together brilliantly in what is the best performance of his career so far. They are also well supported by Jessica Mauboy who is beginning to show that she is a talented actress as well as an amazing singer.

The Sapphires is an amazing film that works on all levels. The fact that it mixes music, drama and comedy together so well makes it an absolute gem.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Sapphires’: http://www.helium.com/items/2358683-movie-reviews-the-sapphires-2012

Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating:The Sapphires (2012) on IMDb