Tagged: Justin Timberlake

Justin Timberlake

When Justin Timberlake announced that he was putting his musical career on semi-hiatus to pursue a career as an actor many laughed. They had every right to; after all many singers had tried to take that path and failed miserable, some in spectacular very public performances as anyone who ever saw “Glitter” would attest to.

On reflection, the move shouldn’t have been such a shock. After all, Timberlake had made his entertainment debut as a young star on the television show “The Mickey Mouse Club.” Even when he was at his peak with pop group NYSNC, he was making appearances in television shows including “Sabrina, The Teenage Witch” and “Touched By An Angel.”

Even before his first solo album in 2002, Timberlake had appeared in the Disney television movie “Model Behavior,” had an uncredited role in feature film “On The Line” and also appeared in the crime comedy “Longshot.”

Timberlake’s first starring role in a film came in 2005’s crime thriller “Edison,” a film that was well received and also saw Timberlake share the screen with acting royalty like Morgan Freeman and Kevin Spacey. From there he soon found himself also getting good write-ups from critics for his roles in “Alpha Dog” and “Black Snake Moan.” However, the same couldn’t be said for “Southland Tales” or “The Love Guru.” The latter may have starred Mike Myers and Jessica Alba, but it is universally regarded as one of the worst films ever made.

“The Love Guru” did have a negative effect on Timberlake’s career. It seemed even a voice acting role in the popular “Shrek The Third” couldn’t really over turn the negative press that came from “The Love Guru” and soon he found himself appearing in other poorly received films like “The Open Road” (alongside Ted Danson) and the straight-to-video action flick “Next Big Thing.”

The string of bad films had started some of the Timberlake-haters saying they had been right all along and that Justin Timberlake’s film career was dead in the water. That soon changed though when director David Fincher took a chance on Timberlake and cast him as Napster creator Sean Parker in the well-received biopic “The Social Network.” Many critics referenced the fact that Timberlake stole the show with his performance and it seemed that the good press was enough to kick start his career once again.

Soon he was voicing the crowd favorite Boo Boo in “Yogi Bear” and then making the adults laugh in the underrated comedies “Bad Teacher” (with Cameron Diaz) and “Friends With Benefits” (with Mila Kunis. “In Time” saw Timberlake add science fiction to the growing list of genres that he had tackled while his appearance alongside Clint Eastwood in the baseball flick “Trouble With The Curve” while his role in the Coen Brother’s flick “Inside Llewyn Davis” showed the arthouse crowd that Timberlake does indeed have some fine acting skills. Sadly, his appearance alongside Ben Affleck in the thriller “Runner Runner” was let down by a poor script, but any decent cinema goer now knows that Timberlake has enough acting points in the bank to get over one bad role.

There is no doubting that Justin Timberlake has now made it as an actor and seeing that his last solo album was poorly received by the critics, he should be feeling very happy that he chose a career on the big screen over one behind the microphone.

Inside Llewyn Davis

Summary: Shambolic and and self-absorbed, Llewyn (Oscar Isaac) is a penniless musician trying to make it as a solo artist. Roughing it on the couches of barely sympathetic friends, he scores the occasional gig at a bar in Greenwich Village but struggles to break through despite earlier success with his former musical partner Mike. Things go from hapless to hopeless when Llewyn discovers that his fling with married songstress Jean (Carey Mulligan) has resulted in a very unwanted pregnancy..

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 16th January, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, France

Director: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen

Screenwriter: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen

Cast: Robin Bartlett (Lillian Gorfein), Max Casella (Pappi Corsicato), Richard Cordero (Nunzio), Adam Driver (Al Cody), John Goodman (Roland Turner), Jerry Grayson (Mel Novikoff), Garrett Hedlund (Johnny Five), Helen Hong (Janet Fung), Oscar Isaac (Llewyn Davis), Ian Jarvis (Cromartie), Alex Karpovsky (Marty Green), Sylvia Kauders (Ginny), Bradley Mott (Joe Flom), Carey Mulligan (Jean), Ethan Phillips (Mitch Gorfein), Bonnie Rose (Dodi Gamble), Michael Rosner (Arlen Gamble), Stark Sands (Troy Nelson), Jeanine Serralles (Joy), Justin Timberlake (Jim)

Runtime: 103 mins

Classification:M

OUR INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS REVIEWS & RATINGS

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’ that is available on http://www.filmreviews.net.au/

David Griffiths:

“Inside Llewyn Davis” is a strange film. Not strange in the Terrence Malick-you’ll-never-understand-this-in-a-million-years way but strange in the sense that the Coen Brothers seem to want to break so many film making laws with the film that is should be universally despised. Instead it turns out to be a warm film that slowly grows on its audience.

The film follows Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac) a down on his luck musician who dreams of one day making it big, despite the fact that everything he touches turns to crap. He has no home and instead just drifts from couch-to-couch, whether it be the rich couch of Mitch Gorfein (Ethan Phillips), that leads to an adventure with their cat, or the couch of his musician buddy, Jim (Justin Timberlake).

Just when it seems that is life couldn’t go lower Llewyn discovers that he has now got Jim’s partner Jean (Carey Mulligan) pregnant and his new album is making no money at all. Faced with the fact that he needs to make money fast for Jean’s abortion he tries one last desperate bid to get his career on track.

The Coen’s have bad “Inside Llewyn Davis” a slow film but they also seem to do the impossible and make a film likable where all the characters are unlikable. Llewyn is far from likable, yet for some reason you find yourself barracking for him to get somewhere in life. Then there is a Jean a bad tempered character whose easy stance on abortion will sit uneasily with some audience members. Yet there is something in the power of the Coen’s writing that makes you want to like this film. Characters such as the heroin addicted, foul-mouthed jazz musician Roland Turner (John Goodman) may be unlikable but they sure are memorable.

“Inside Llewyn Davis” is also one of those films that strangely makes you realise (after the credits have rolled) that not much actually happened throughout the film, yet for some reason it never, ever gets to the point where it is boring. The story meanders its way through a short period of Llewyn’s life and the journey is made sweeter by the fact that it contains a dreamy folk music soundtrack that is enhanced by the great vocal stylings of Oscar Isaac, Justin Timberlake and Adam Driver. If you don’t like folk music however then you don’t stand a chance of being drawn into this film.

As is the case with most Coen brothers films the film is brilliant cast. Isaac excels in a challenging role that sees him having to not only act but sing songs in their entirely, yes in a way this film is a musical. Carey Mulligan and Justin Timberlake are serviceable yet underused in their roles while just like so many of his recent films John Goodman steals the show playing an over-the-top character that just sadly seems to peters out as the film goes on.

This is very much a film that will divide audiences and critics alike. Some will like it’s alternative style of story-telling while others will feel that the fact it goes around in one big circle and doesn’t really go anywhere makes it very, very annoying. “Inside Llewyn Davis” is an acquired taste but it is one that I quickly warmed to.

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  Inside Llewyn Davis (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Inside Llewyn Davis′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #65 for our full 47 Ronin review.

Trailer:

Beyonce

The fifth solo studio album from Beyoncé is now available worldwide, exclusively on the iTunes Store (www.iTunes.com/beyonce).  The self-titled set is the artist’s first visual album.   BEYONCÉ is infused with 14 new songs and 17 visually stunning, provocative videos shot around the world from Houston to New York City to Paris, and Sydney to Rio de Janeiro, all before the album’s release.

“I see music,” says Beyoncé about her decision to create a visual album. “It’s more than just what I hear.  When I’m connected to something, I immediately see a visual or a series of images that are tied to a feeling or an emotion, a memory from my childhood, thoughts about life, my dreams or my fantasies.  And they’re all connected to the music.”

That the album is available on the day the world is learning about its release is an unprecedented strategic move by the artist to deliver music and visual content directly to her fans when she wants to and how she wants to, with no filter.  This unique approach allows music fans to be the first to listen, view, engage and form their own opinions void of any middleman.  In the age of social media and an insatiable appetite for direct communication, this is the answer to the question asked over and over again, when is Beyoncé’s next album coming?

“ I didn’t want to release my music the way I’ve done it,” she states.  “I am bored with that.  I feel like I am able to speak directly to my fans.   There’s so much that gets between the music, the artist and the fans.  I felt like I didn’t want anybody to give the message when my record is coming out. I just want this to come out when it’s ready and from me to my fans.”

Stripped of gimmicks, teasers and marketing campaigns, this project is truly about art before hype.

Starting now, BEYONCÉ is available globally and exclusively on the iTunes Store (www.itunes.com/beyonce).

For an artist who has been the target of leaks, this is a fully designed preventative plan. The album will be offered as a cohesive body of work with every song and every video available all at once for one single purchase.

While not a concept album, the record is designed to be consumed as a comprehensive audio/visual piece from top to bottom.  The antithesis of making singles, the visual album is a non-linear journey through the thoughts and visions of Beyoncé.

Manufacturing of physical albums begins today and the double disc CD/DVD will be available at retail in time for the holidays.

Facebook exclusively premieres Part One of  “Self-Titled,” a mini doc feature that gives a glimpse into the entire project.  It details her mind-set and artistic vision throughout the making of BEYONCÉ.  By embracing an ever-evolving digital landscape, she creates an innovative, fully immersive, multiplatform experience for the first visual album of her career, completely changing the way her fans will consume music.

Not one to stand on past achievements, this is an artist who thrives on evolving, challenging herself and raising the bar. This creative process gave Beyoncé power over her music and provided an opportunity to control how the music is heard.  She is not playing by the rules and breaking what is expected, preferring to put music out as an entire body of work.

Beyoncé, wearing multiple hats as writer, producer and director, put together a genius team of artists, songwriters, producers and video directors for her visual album that include JAY Z, Timbaland, Justin Timberlake, Pharrell Williams, Drake, The Dream, Sia, Ryan Tedder, Miguel, Frank Ocean, Hit Boy, Ammo, Boots, Detail, Jake Nava, Hype Williams, Terry Richardson, Melina Matsoukas, Jonas Åkerlund, Ricky Saiz, Pierre Debusschere, @lilinternet, Noah “40” Shebib, Francesco Carrozzini, Caroline Polachek,  Ed Burke, Bill Kirstein and Todd Tourso.

She recorded all over the world for a year and a half but the initial recording started after the writers and producers gathered under one roof in The Hamptons, New York’s beach enclave, in the summer of 2012 to live together, work together and to immerse themselves into her world and into her head.   The fans that have grown up with the performer, mature and seasoned enough to relate to the content and the shared experiences, inspire the music, with themes that explore love, loss, fear, anger, honesty, happiness, sexuality and confidence.

For the videos, some of which she co-directed, she preferred to work with a more care-free formula.  Shot primarily during her successful “Mrs. Carter Show World Tour,” the videos were veiled in secrecy, even though they were filmed in open places, including a beach in Brazil, the streets of NYC, on the famed Cyclone Rollercoaster in Coney Island, New York, downtown Los Angeles, a chateau in Paris, a roller skating rink in Houston, Texas where she skated as a child, and a beautiful church in South America.  She mixed up the creative, going for big and small and set out on shoots eager to capture the spontaneity and honesty in every moment.  The videos are visually stimulating, charged with visionary cinematography and clever storytelling. They capture every side of who she is, complete with vulnerability and imperfections.

BEYONCÉ is an explosive sonic and visual communiqué to music fans from an artist who has earned the right to do things on her terms.  “I just want to give my album to the people I love and respect and hope that they feel the same thing I felt when I made the music,” said Beyoncé.

You can hear the interview with Beyonce talking about her new album here.

Runner Runner

Summary: A businessman who owns an offshore gambling operation finds his relationship with his protege reaching a boiling point.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th September, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Brad Furman

Screenwriter: Brian Koppelman, David Levien

Cast: Ben Affleck (Ivan Block), Gemma Arterton (Rebecca Shafran), Jordan Beder (Paul Arnaud), Oliver Cooper (Andrew Cronin), Randall M. Corsi (Robe), David Costabile (Professor Horstein), Michael Esper (Billy ‘Pet’ Petricoff), Christina George (Wilson), Bob Gunton (Dean Alex Monroe), John Heard (Harry Furst), Jeannine Kaspar (Ashley), Vincent Laresca (Sergeant Barrancas), Louis Lombardi (Archie), Anthony Mackie (Agent Shavers), Christopher McLinden (Lico), James Molina (Esteban), Clifford Myatt (Towel), Dayo Okeniyi (Lionel), Sam Palladio (Shecky), Mekaila Ray (Jane), Ben Schwartz (Craig), Justin Timberlake (Richie Furst), Sam Upton (Agent Poole), Yul Vazquez (Delegate Herrera), Steven Weisz (Doorman John)

Runtime: 91 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘RUNNER RUNNER’:

David Griffiths: Stars(2.5)

Please check Dave’s review of ‘Runner Runner’ that is available on The Helium Entertainment Channel

Adam Ross: Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Runner Runner (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Runner Runner′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Ep 51 for a more in depth review of ‘Runner Runner’.

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

In Episode #46 of ‘The Good The Bad Ugly Film Show’ the boys took a look at who they thought were the best ever child actors, let’s have a look at their selections.

GREG KING’S LIST

Jonathan Taylor Thomas

  • Elizabeth Taylor
  • Mickey Rooney
  • Judy Garland
  • Kurt Russell
  • Jodie Foster
  • Brooke Shields
  • Anna Paquin
  • Macaulay Culkin
  • Frankie Muniz
  • Dakota Fanning
  • Chloe Grace Moretz
  • Roddy McDowall
  • Brady Bunch Cast (Eve Plumb)
  • Christina Ricci
  • Natalie Portman
  • Haley Joel Osment
  • Ron Howard
  • Tatum O’Neil
  • Nicholas Hoult
  • Christian Bale
  • Drew Barrymore
  • Ben Oxenbould
  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt
  • Jonathan Taylor Thomas
  • The Olson Twins
  • Devon Sawa
  • Kodi Smit-McPhee
  • Angourie Rice
  • Garry Pankhurst
  • Henry Thomas
  • Jake Lloyd
  • Freddie Highmore
  • Leonardo DiCpario

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Photographed by John Tass-Parker

  • Natalie Portman
  • Jodie Foster
  • Haley Joel Osment
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Linda Blair
  • Kodi Smit-McPhee
  • Josh Peck
  • Rufus Read
  • Jacob Kogan
  • Isabelle Fuhrman
  • Eloise Laurence
  • Pierce Gagnon
  • Asa Butterfield

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Hanna Mangan lawrence

  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Drew Barrymore
  • Sebastian Gregory
  • Hannah Mangan-Lawrence
  • Bailee Madison
  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt
  • Mila Kunis
  • Christian Bale
  • Abigail Breslin
  • Rachel Miner
  • Bijou Phillips
  • Kristen Stewart
  • Joshua Jackson
  • Daniel Radcliffe
  • Rupert Grint
  • Emma Watson
  • Tom Felton
  • Tom Holland
  • Tom Russell
  • Kodi Smit-McPhee
  • James McKenna
  • Michelle Williams
  • Robert Capron
  • Matthew Krok
  • Leonardo DiCaprio
  • WORST LIST – Macaulay Culkin
  • WORST LIST – Jaden Smith

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Michelle Williams

  • Different Strokes Cast
  • Macuarly Culkin
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Jonathan Lipnicki
  • Michelle Williams
  • Justin Timberlake
  • Danica McKellar
  • Jack Wilde
  • David Faustino
  • Christina Ricci
  • Henry Stevens
  • Jaleel White

 

Runner Runner

Watch the official Runner Runner trailer, starring Ben Affleck and Justin Timberlake. In cinemas September 27th 2013.

Richie (Justin Timberlake), a Princeton college student who pays for school with online gambling, bottoms out and travels to Costa Rica to confront the mastermind, Ivan (Ben Affleck), whom he believes has swindled him. Ivan sees a kindred spirit in Richie and brings the younger man into his operation. When Richie comes to fully understand the deviousness of his new boss, he tries to turn the tables on him.

The Good The Bad The UglyIn Episode 38 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Dave, Nick and Greg took at look at what they feel are the best acting performances in films made after the year 2000.

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Joaquin Phoenix

Viggo Mortensen – ‘A Dangerous Method

Christoph Waltz – ‘Inglorious Basterds

Kirsten Dunst – ‘Melancholia

Charlotte Gainsbourg – ‘Melancholia’

Russell Crowe – ‘A Beautiful Mind’

Tom Hardy – ‘Bronson’

Javier Bardem – ‘No Country For Old Men’

Will Ferrell – ‘Zoolander’

George Clooney – ‘The American’

Robert Downey Jnr – ‘Iron Man’

Daniel Day Lewis – ‘There Will Be Blood’, ‘Lincoln’

Paul Giamatti – ‘Sideways’

Anna Paquin – ‘Margaret’

Michael Fassbender – ‘Shame’, ‘X-Men: First Class’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Naomi Watts – ‘Mullholland Drive’

Joaquin Phoenix – ‘The Master’

 

GREG KING’S LIST

Heath Ledger

Matthew McConaughey – ‘Mud’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Anne Hathaway – “Les Miserables’

Sean Penn – ‘Mystic River’

Daniel Day Lewis – ‘Lincoln’

Christoph Waltz – ‘Inglorious Basterds’, ‘Django Unchained’

Carey Mulligan – ‘Shame’

Joseph Gordon-Levitt – ‘Mysterious Skin’, ’50/50′

Ryan Gosling – ‘Blue Valentine’, ‘The Place Beyond The Pines’, ‘Drive’

Matt Damon – ‘The Bourne Franchise’, ‘Promised Land’

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Leonardo DiCaprio

Joaquin Phoenix – ‘The Master’

Michael Shannon – ‘Take Shelter’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Anne Hathaway – ‘Rachel Getting Married’

Mickey Rourke – ‘The Wrestler’

Forrest Whitaker – ‘The Last King Of Scotland’

Alan Rickman – ‘Harry Potter Franchise’

Emma Stone – ‘Easy A’

Noomi Rapace – ‘The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo’

Joseph Gordon-Levitt – ‘Mysterious Skin’, ‘Brick’

Hugo Weaving – ‘Last Ride’

Ellen Page – ‘Juno’

Christoph Waltz – ‘Django Unchained’

Leonardo DiCaprio – ‘Shutter Island’, ‘Django Unchained’, ‘The Departed’

Michelle Williams – ‘Wendy & Lucy’, ‘Blue Valentine’

Kate Winslet – ‘Little Children’, ‘The Reader’

Penelope Cruz – ‘Vicky Cristina Barcelona’

Sam Rockwell – ‘Moon’

Jessie Eisenberg – ‘The Social Network’

Justin Timberlake – ‘The Social Network’

Nicolas Cage – ‘Lord Of War’

George Clooney – ‘The Descendants’

Michael Fassbender – ‘Shame’

Jennifer Lawrence – ‘Winter’s Bone’

Matthew McConaughey – ‘Mud’

Ryan Gosling – ‘Drive’

Robert Pattinson – ‘Remember Me’

Tom Holland – ‘The Impossible’

Naomi Watts – ‘The Impossible’

Summary: Gus Lobel (Clint Eastwood) has been one of the best scouts in baseball for decades, but, despite his efforts to hide it, age is starting to catch up with him. Nevertheless, Gus—who can tell a pitch just by the crack of the bat—refuses to be benched for what could be the final innings of his career.

He may not have a choice. The front office of the Atlanta Braves is starting to question his judgment, especially with the country’s hottest batting phenom on deck for the draft. The one person who might be able to help is also the one person Gus would never ask: his daughter, Mickey (Amy Adams), an associate at a high-powered Atlanta law firm whose drive and ambition has put her on the fast track to becoming partner. Mickey has never been close to her father, who was ill-equipped to be a single parent after the death of his wife. Even now, in the rare moments they share, he is too easily distracted by what Mickey assumes is his first love: the game.

Against her better judgment, and over Gus’s objections, Mickey joins him on his latest scouting trip to North Carolina, jeopardizing her own career to save his. Forced to spend time together for the first time in years, each makes new discoveries—revealing long-held truths about their past and present that could change their future.

Timberlake is Johnny Flanagan, a rival scout who has his sights on a career in the announcer’s booth…and has eyes for Mickey.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 6th December, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: N/A

Country: United States

Director: Robert Lorenz

Screenwriter: Randy Brown

Cast: Amy Adams (Mickey), Norma Alvarez (Grace Sanchez), Rus Blackwell ((Rick), Matt Bush (Danny), Karen Ceesay (Carol), Tom Dreeson (Rock), Brian F. Durkin (Matt Nelson), Clint Eastwood (Gus), Scott Eastwood (Billy Clark), Louis Fox (Lloyd), James Patrick Freetly (Todd), Jay Galloway (Ringo Sanchez), Jack Gilpin (Schwartz), John Goodman (Pete Klein), Bob Gunton (Watson), Clifton Guterman (Neil), Kevin Harrison (Young Gus), Peter Hermann (Greg), Ed Lauter (Max), Matthew Lillard (Phillip Sanderson), Joe Massingill (Bo Gentry), Seth Meriwether (Wilson), Ricky Muse (Jimmy), Robert Patrick (Vince), Chelcie Ross (Smitty), Bud Selig (himself), Tyler Silva (Carlos Sanchez), Raymond Anthony Thomas (Lucious), Justin Timberlake (Johnny), Julia Walters (Young Mickey), George Wyner (Rosenbloom)

Runtime: 111 mins

Classification: CTC

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Trouble With The Curve’ Review:

‘Trouble With The Curve’ desperately wants to be as good as ‘Moneyball’, yet at the same time wants to take a swipe at its main belief… that modern day baseball scouts can now be replaced by a computer. Sadly though the writer of ‘Trouble With The Curve’ hasn’t developed a script just as good, despite that though the film remains a good watch.

Gus Lobel (Clint Eastwood – Gran Torino, Million Dollar Baby) is one of the finest baseball scouts that America has ever had. His track record speaks for himself and he feels that he is safe in his job with the Atlanta Braves despite the fact that he is keeping a big secret – the fact that he is slowly losing his eyesight.

But when the likes of Phillip Sanderson (Matthew Lillard – Deep Dark Canyon, TV’S Criminal Minds) begin to put pressure on Gus’ immediate boss, Pete Klein (John Goodman – Flight, Argo) it seems that Gus’ days in his job may be numbered. Phillip keeps on saying that computers can now determine whether a player should be drafted or not and when Gus’ ideas on a rumoured number one picks seems to be different to everyone else’s it looks like Phillip may be right.

Despite the fact that Gus’ daughter, Mickey (Amy Adams – The Master, On The Road) feels that her father has neglected her over the years she travels to be with him when she learns about his failing eyesight. While the two scope the new recruit they are surprised to find help in the form of Johnny Flanagan (Justin Timberlake – In Time, Friends With Benefits), a player that Gus once scouted but was injured thanks to a mistake by team management.

The major weakness with ‘Trouble With The Curve’ is that screenwriter, Randy Brown has just made too many of the major storylines in the film too obvious to pick where they are going and then in similar fashion made the so called ‘evil’ characters such as Phillip so one dimensional that they just become the token bad guy… almost unbelievable.

But then on the other hand Brown gets a lot of things right. The secret that has caused tension between Gus and Mickey for so many years is brilliant (and certainly can’t be picked early on) while the fact that Brown has also written the scenes between Mickey and Johnny in such a way that the film has a romantic drama storyline rather than making it a stock standard romantic comedy also shows great skill.

Anyone expecting a huge acting effort from veteran Clint Eastwood shouldn’t get their hopes up, he simply plays the grumpy old man role that he has been doing so well over the past few years. Instead the winners here are Amy Adams and Justin Timberlake. Timberlake again shows why he deserves respect as an actor while Adams puts the past sin (known as ‘The Muppets’) behind her with a serviceable performance.

‘Trouble With The Curve’ is nowhere near as good as ‘Moneyball’ but is still a good watch and will be enjoyed my males and females alike even if they know nothing about baseball.

Other ‘Trouble With The Curve’ Reviews By Dave Griffiths: http://www.helium.com/items/2397762-trouble-with-the-curve-review

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: Trouble with the Curve (2012) on IMDb