Tagged: Karl Urban

Riddick

Summary: Left for dead on a sun-scorched planet, Riddick finds himself up against an alien race of predators.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 12th September, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK

Director: David Twohy

Screenwriter: David Twohy, Jim Wheat (characters), Ken Wheat (characters)

Cast: Andreas Apergis (Krone), Dave Bautista (Diaz), Noah Danby (Nunez), Vin Diesel (Riddick), Nolan Gerard Funk (Luna), Danny Blanco Hall (Falco), Lani Minella (Aereon VO), Jordi Molla (Santana), Matt Nable (Boss Johns), Neil Napier (Rubio), Conrad Pla (Vargas), Kate Sackhoff (Dahl), Raoul Trujillo (Lockspur), Karl Urban (Vaako), Bokeem Woodbine (Moss)

Runtime: 118 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘RIDDICK’:

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Riddick’ that is available on www.filmreviews.com.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(2)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Riddick’ that is available on the Southern FM website.

Adam Ross: Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Riddick (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Riddick′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 49 for our in-depth review of ‘Riddick.’

Trailer:

Star Trek Into Darkness

Summary:  When the crew of the Enterprise is called back home, they find an unstoppable force of terror from within their own organization has detonated the fleet and everything it stands for, leaving our world in a state of crisis. With a personal score to settle, Captain Kirk leads a manhunt to a war-zone world to capture a one man weapon of mass destruction. As our heroes are propelled into an epic chess game of life and death, love will be challenged, friendships will be torn apart, and sacrifices must be made for the only family Kirk has left: his crew.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 9th May, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: J.J. Abrams

Screenwriter: Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman, Damon Lindelof, Gene Roddenberry (original ‘Star Trek’ concept)

Cast: Chloe Act (Nikicha Tomser), Beau Billingslea (Captain Abbott), John Cho (Hikaru Sulu), Noel Clarke (Thomas Harewood), Benedict Cumberbatch (Khan), Alice Eve (Dr. Carol Marcus), Leni Ford (Cosmoe), Bruce Greenwood (Christopher Pike), Chris Hemsworth (George Kirk), Leonard Nimoy (Spock Prime), Simon Pegg (Scotty), Chris Pine (James T. Kirk), Zachary Quinto (Spock), Zoe Saldana (Nyota Uhura), Karl Urban (Bones), Peter Weller (Admiral Marcus), Anton Yelchin (Pavel Chekov)

Runtime: 132 mins

Classification:M

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS’:

David Griffiths: Stars(4)

Please check Dave’s review of ‘Star Trek Into Darkness’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Star Trek Into Darkness’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out 0f 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating: Star Trek Into Darkness (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Star Trek Into Darkness′: Check Episode #31 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Star Trek Into Darkness’.

Trailer:

Star Trek

 

Summary: The brash James T. Kirk tries to live up to his father’s legacy with Commander Spock keeping him in check as a vengeful, time-traveling Romulan creates black holes to destroy the Federation one planet at a time.

Year: 2009

Australian Cinema Release Date: 7th May 2009

Australian DVD Release Date: October 2009

Country: United States, Germany

Director: J.J. Abrams

Screenwriter: Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman, Gene Roddenberry (television series)

Cast: Rico E. Anderson (Captain Kelley Bogel), Eric Bana (Nero), Jimmy Bennett (Young James T. Kirk), Ben Binswagner (Admiral James Komack), John Cho (Sulu), Clifton Collins Jnr. (Ayel), Ben Cross (Sarek), Spencer Daniels (Johnny), Calvin Dean (Security Officer Daniels), Tony Elias (Officer Pitts), Amanda Foreman (Hannity), Bruce Greenwood (Pike), Tony Guma (Lew The Bartender), Chris Hemsworth (George Kirk), Brad William Henke (Uncle Frank), Jacob Kogan (Young Spock), Jennifer Morrison (Winona Kirk), Leonard Nemoy (Spock Prime), Rachel Nichols (Gaila), Jim Nieb (Sal), Simon Pegg (Scotty), Tyler Perry (Admiral Richard Barnett), Chris Pine (Kirk), Zachary Quinto (Spock), Jonny Rees (Chief Engineer Olson), Winona Ryder (Amanda Grayson), Zoe Saldana (Ulhara), Faran Tahir (Captain Robau), Karl Urban (Bones), Jenna Vaughn (Baby Spock), Anton Yelchin (Chekov)

Runtime: 127 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR STAR TREK REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Despite the fact I’m a huge sci-fi fan I’ve never really been able to get into ‘Star Trek’ so it was with much trepidation that I went to see the new film. But I need not have worried as once again J.J. Abrams shows that he can make anything a great watch, and this time he makes ‘Star Trek’ accessible to those who have never seen one of the films or TV Shows… no mean feat.

This ‘Star Trek’ goes right back to the beginning as we see the birth of James T. Kirk (Chris Pine) as the Star Fleet battles against a ruthless enemy, Nero (Eric Bana). While Kirk travels through troubled teenage years Nero continues on a mission of revenge.  This continues as Kirk is introduced to Spock (Zachary Quinto), Dr. Leonard ‘Bones’ McCoy (Karl Urban), Hikaru Sulu (John Cho), Nyota Uhura (Zoe Saldana) and Pavel Chekov (Anton Yelchin), and even though most of them don’t know what to make of him they are forced to trust him hen Nero comes across technology that allows him to destroy planets one by one.

Taking ‘Star Trek’ right back to the beginning is perhaps one of the smartest things J.J Abrams could do. By doing this even people who know nothing about the ‘Star Trek’ universe can get into the story and this could in turn breathe new life into the franchise. And while this seems to have ruffled a few feathers with older ‘Star Trek’ fans it works remarkably well in my eyes.

Story wise, like any Abrams film (and even Kurtzman scripts) ‘Star Trek’ works as it gives great emotional access to it’s characters while mixing drama with all the elements of a true big-budget action blockbuster. Characters like Kirk and Spock become well-rounded characters that genuinely draw emotion out of the audience… now how many sci-fi films can you say that about. The only weakness that can leave you a little disappointed is the fact that even though Bana is brilliant as Nero he just doesn’t get the screen time (or lines) that an actor of this caliber warrants. It does seem a waste of his talents.

If you are afraid of the ‘Star Trek’ brand don’t be… Abrams has done a wonderful job separating this from the past films and TV shows and you can watch this as an action sci-fi film that stands on it’s own two feet. This is a new beginning for ‘Star Trek’… a film that will keep any cinema lover in awe… and on the edge of their seat. This is ‘Star Trek’ for the new generation

 

Helium Review:

‘Star Wars’ fans don’t be too worried… you aren’t alone. See only a few years ago it was ‘Star Trek’ fans who heard that news that J.J. Abrams was going to bring life back into a franchise that was supposedly ‘stale’. The good news for ‘Star Wars’ fans is that Abrams didn’t exactly do some a bad job on ‘Star Trek’.

The best thing about Abrams’ ‘Star Trek’ was he made it accessible for people that had never watched any of the previous films or television shows…. not only did Abrams breathe new life into the series but he also opened it up for a new legion of fans.

Abrams makes sure that ‘Star Trek’ goes right back to the beginning so far back that the audience actually sees the birth of James T Kirk (Chris Pine – Rise Of The Guardians, People Like Us) as the Star Fleet battles against a ruthless enemy, Nero (Eric Bana – Deadfall, Hanna).

While Kirk travels through is troubled teenage years (with a little bit of difficulty) Nero continues on a mission of revenge. This continues as Kirk is introduced to Spock (Zachary Quinto – Periods, Dog Eat Dog), Dr. Leonard ‘Bones’ McCoy (Karl Urban – Dredd, Priest), Hikaru Sulu (John Cho – Identity Thief, Total Recall), Nyota Uhura (Zoe Saldana – The Words, Colombiana) and Pavel Chekov (Anton Yelchin – The Pirates! Band Of Misfits, Fright Night) and even though most of them don’t know what to make of him they are forced to trust him when Nero comes across technology that allows him to destroy every planet one-by-one.

Many may have scoffed when they heard that Abrams was going to tackle ‘Star Trek’, it was like people had forgotten that he is no slouch when it comes to science-fiction… anybody remember ‘Cloverfield’ or even some of the better elements of ‘Lost’? Like he does whenever he tackles a project he takes the basic story and turns it into an action blockbuster.

Together with Alan Kurtzman (who also proved he can be creative with science-fiction with ‘Transformers’ and ‘The Island’) Abrams remembered to infuse some drama and suspense into ‘Star Trek’ but more importantly he turns characters like Kirk and Spock into well rounded three-dimensional characters… something that a lot of science-fiction writers and directors seem to forget to do.

It also seems like Abrams got the casting right with ‘Star Trek’. Chris Pine used the role of Kirk to reinvent his career and it certainly seemed to impress producers as not long later he was playing Captain America firstly in his own film and then in ‘The Avengers’. In fact the whole cast step up and while Simon Pegg gets to show off some style without going into full comedy mode, but you do have to feel sorry for Eric Bana, while he puts in a good effort he just isn’t given the screen time or lines to show what he is truly capable of. An actor of his calibre was simply wasted in the role of Nemo.

When it came to ‘Star Trek’ Abrams really opened up the franchise to a whole new generation (pun intended) and as a blockbuster it works amazingly well. If ‘Star Trek’ is anything to go by then maybe ‘Star Wars’ is in safe hands after all.

Buzz Magazine Review:

J.J. Abrams once again shows that he can make anything a great watch, and this time he makes ‘Star Trek’ accessible to those who have never seen one of the films or TV Shows… no mean feat.

This ‘Star Trek’ goes right back to the beginning as we see the birth of James T. Kirk (Chris Pine) as the Star Fleet battles against a ruthless enemy, Nero (Eric Bana). While Kirk travels through troubled teenage years Nero continues on a mission of revenge.  This continues as Kirk is introduced to Spock (Zachary Quinto) and the rest of the Enterprise crew, although they don’t trust him. Will they trust him when they really need to?

Story wise, like any Abrams film ‘Star Trek’ works as it gives great emotional access to it’s characters while mixing drama with all the elements of a true big-budget action blockbuster. Characters like Kirk and Spock become well-rounded characters that genuinely draw emotion out of the audience… now how many sci-fi films can you say that about. The only weakness that can leave you a little disappointed is the fact that even though Bana is brilliant as Nero he just doesn’t get the screen time (or lines) that an actor of this caliber warrants. It does seem a waste of his talents.

This is a new beginning for ‘Star Trek’… a film that will keep any cinema lover in awe… and on the edge of their seat. This is ‘Star Trek’ for the new generation.

 

Stars(4)

 

 

 

Adam Ross:

Firstly, let me get my Star Trek credentials out of the way. I have never been invested in any incarnations of this franchise. I have only ever watched a handful of episodes of Next Generation and have seen one of the feature films (Star Trek 2: the Wrath of Khan), but I have seen the porn spoof Sex Trek: the Next Penetration if that counts for anything. So it pleases me to report that the new film from Director J.J. Abrams pulled me (a newbie) in like a Romulan tractor beam.

The film starts off with a with a hair-raising space battle and never loses momentum. It is immediately clear: this film has an epic scale.More surprising is the almost instant inclusion of heartfelt emotion. This is a movie that doesn’t sacrifice character for action.

Rebooting the franchise for a new generation has given Abrams’ the chance to populate his film with an exceptional cast. The two brightest lights are Chris Pine as Captain James T. Kirk and Zachary Quinto as Spock. Their natural chemistry injects the film with real heart, the rarest quality in the modern blockbuster. The rest of the cast is decorated with stars: Eric Bana, Zoe Saldana, Simon Pegg and Karl Urban. Like all good team-based films, each member gets their chance to shine.  Screenwriters Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci keep the film moving at a fast pace and manage to establish real motivations for their characters. Their script is so good I almost forgive them for Transformers. Nah, those films are unforgivable.

As good as the cast is, the greatest aspect of this film is not its human element, but its representation of space. The visual effects are staggering, enveloping the audience in the vastness of the film’s universe. Abrams manages to achieve more with this one film than George-nobody-likes-me-Lucas could with his entire ‘Prequel Trilogy’. Disregard any prejudice you may have for the ‘Trek’ and jump on board, you will not regret it.

 

Stars(4)

 

 

Luke Marten:

 I have to admit, I was a bit hesitant about J.J. Abrams reboot of this franchise as i am a fairly hardcore Trekkie having watched all seasons of the tv shows and the previous films and have a big opinion on what a Star Trek film should be. Now that this is the highest grossing Star Trek film by a big margin, obviously it’s a big crowd pleaser, not like the previous installment Nemesis.

Straight away this film grabs the attention with an opening scene featuring a ship in peril and the birth of Kirk in space, without bringing a groan to the audience with once again, a time travel story. Nero (Bana), an angry Romulan from the distant future comes back through time to prevent the destruction of his homeworld. Upon arrival, he immediately destroys the ship containing Kirk’s parents, his father sacrificing himself to save his just born son. With this setup, Abrams has licence to give this Star Trek universe an alternate future to the one already established, thereby not completely trashing the memory of Gene Roddenberry’s vision. This Trek is darker, grittier, more intense and more action based.

The recasting of the original crew is inspired, especially Zachary Quinto as Spock. Chris Pine does an excellent job playing a different kind of Kirk. All major original cast have their moments to shine in this film Uhura, Chekov, Sulu, McCoy and Scotty.

 Because of the urgency placed on the mission to stop Nero in this film, there is a big rushed action feel. The big themes of Roddenberry’s Trek: Equality, Ethics, Evolution of Humanity, a character’s growth to be more human is completely missing from this film. It is just a big entertaining action explosion fest with the original crew characters thrown together on the same ship. It is missing all the elements that make Star Trek the important vision of the future that it is. An entertaining thrill ride it is, and a sequel is now inevitable, but it’s not the same Trek that Roddenberry strived for. While you go to see a movie primarily to be entertained, Star Trek should always make you think about what could be, and what humanity can achieve if it work’s together. I don’t think I want the direction of this new franchise to exclude this.

 Otherwise, anybody not seeing this just cause it’s Star Trek are missing out on a great film. It has a great plot, great characters and is thoroughly enjoyable to everyone as it doesn’t get bogged down in any technical jargon that would alienate the anti-scifi people. And you don’t need to know anything about any previous Trek as it is a reboot.

Stars(4)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating:  Star Trek (2009) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Star Trek reviews: The Buzz Magazine Star Trek review first appeared in Buzz Magazine – October 2009.

Trailer: