Tagged: Kate Hudson

Deepwater Horizon

Summary: A story set on the offshore drilling rig Deepwater Horizon, which exploded during April 2010 and created the worst oil spill in U.S. history.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 6th October 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Peter Berg

Screenwriter: Matthew Michael Carnahan, Matthew Sand

Cast: Joel Allen (Old Man Carl), Stella Allen (Sydney), Jonathan Angel (Gordon Jones), Peter Berg (Mr. Skip), Robert Walker Branchaud (Doug Brown), Anthony Centonze (Dan Barron/Roughneck #1), Joe Chrest (Sims), James DuMont (O’Bryan), J.D. Evermore (Dewey A. Revette), Henry Frost (Shane M. Roshto), Douglas M. Griffin (Landry), Garrett Hines (Wyman Wheeler), Michael Howell (Roy Wyatt Kemp), Kate Hudson (Felicia), Jason Kirkpatrick (Aaron Dale Burkeen), Garrett Kruithof (Karl Kleppinger Jnr.), Brad Leland (Kaluza), David Maldonado (Kuchta), John Malkovich (Vidrine), Terry Milam (Keith Blair Manuel), Dylan O’Brien (Caleb Holloway), Mayla Parker (Natlie (voice)), Jason Pine (Stephen Ray Curtis), Gina Rodriguez (Andrea Fleytas), Kurt Russell (Jimmy Harrell), Jeremy Sande (Adam Weise), Juston Street (Anthony Gervasio), Ethan Suplee (Jason Anderson), Deneen Tyler (Paula Walker), Mark Wahlberg (Mike Williams), Ronald Weaver (Donald Clark)

Runtime: 107 mins

Classification: M



David Griffiths:

Peter Berg (Friday Night Lights) has to be one of the most underrated film directors going around. Barring the ill-fated Battleship Berg has created always created films and television shows that felt as natural as can be. Lone Survivor made the audience feel that they were right there on the battlefield while many made the mistake of watching Friday Night Lights and thought they were watching a reality television show about a High School football team. Now Berg has taken that natural style of film-making and introduced it to the disaster film genre.

Deepwater Horizon tells the true story of electrician Mike Williams (Mark Wahlberg – Lone Survivor) who in 2010 left his wife, Felicia (Kate Hudson – Almost Famous), and once again went to work on the oil rig named ‘Deepwater Horizon’ in the Gulf Of Mexico. What he didn’t know was that on that fateful day due to poor work safety practices by BP an accident would occur that would cause the rig to erupt into flames. Suddenly Mike and his colleagues including his boss Mr. Jimmy (Kurt Russell – The Thing), radio operator Andrea Fleytas (Gina Rodriguez – Filly Brown), hard worker Caleb Holloway (Dylan O’BrienThe Maze Runner) and BP representative Vidrine (John Malkovich – Red 2) all find themselves fighting for their lives.

As a filmmaker Berg should be congratulated for his work with Deepwater Horizon. It was no secret that some of the survivors of the real Deepwater Horizon disaster were hesitant in wanting this film to be made, but they need not of worried. Berg certainly doesn’t ‘trivialize’ the memory of the men who died on that fateful day by making this a popcorn action film. Instead he makes this a character drama about not only the men who died on that day but also shows the world the valiant actions of people like Mike Williams whose brave acts saved many of the workers. To his credit Berg also doesn’t hide the facts of exactly what happened that day – no he points the finger firmly at BP without any hesitation even though he wouldn’t have known how the huge corporation would have reacted to it.

Many films these days claim to be suspenseful but few filmmakers have the skills to make the audience feel as part of the action and suspense as Berg does here. While with Lone Survivor the audience felt they were there on the side of the hill during the battle here Berg’s realistic style of directing makes the audience feel you are right there on the rig with Mike… you even at times feel like you can feel the heat of the flames against your skin.

Berg’s filmmaking is also well supported by his screen writers who don’t waste time making this film too scientific. The audience is given bite-sized pieces of information about what an oil rig does and what has gone wrong here but they never forget that at the heart of this film it is a character drama. So instead of focusing on the ins and outs of the rig they concentrate the suspense around a man trying to get home to his daughter and wife and a scared woman trying to survive in order to see her partner again. The fact that little things like a dinosaur tooth for show-and-tell and car problems back home are so seamlessly inserted into the script just go even further into humanizing this story. Having said that though it is also important to point out the Berg and his cinematographer, Enrique Chediak (The 5th Wave), also create some amazing action sequences as the rig burns against a night sky.

As a director Berg also brings the best out in his cast. Here Mark Wahlberg delivers the best of both worlds as he plays the action hero extremely well but also has the dramatic acting ability to pull off the character driven elements of the screenplay as well. Kurt Russell also benefits from one of the more meatier roles he has been given over the years and he is well matched by John Malkovich who is technically this film’s ‘bad guy.’ Despite her limited screen time Kate Hudson is also one of the standouts of the film.

Deepwater Horizon is proof that a modern day disaster film can actually find the right mix of action and character drama. Brilliant directing by Peter Berg makes this one of the must see films of 2016.





Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)


IMDB Rating:  Deepwater Horizon (2016) on IMDb


Other Subculture Entertainment Deepwater Horizon Reviews: Nil


Mother's Day

Summary: As Mother’s Day rapidly approaches various people find themselves going through different stages of life. Sandy (Jennifer Aniston) finds that her ex-husband’s suprise is nothing like she expected, Miranda (Julia Roberts) decides to keep impressing her fans and ignore the fact the day is near, Jesse (Kate Hudson) and Gabi (Sarah Chalke) find themselves having to hide their lives from their parents, Bradley (Jason Sudeikis) prepares to help his daughters through their first Mother’s Day after the death of their mother while Kristin (Britt Robertson) finds it impossible to accept Zack’s (Jack Whitehall) marriage proposal as she heads into her first Mother’s Day.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th April 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Garry Marshall

Screenwriter: Tom Hines, Lily Hollander, Anya Kochoff, Matthew Walker

Cast: Jennifer Aniston (Sandy), Ella Anderson (Vicky), Brittany Belt (Beth Anne), Ayden Bivek (Tanner), Charly Briggs (Baby Katie Zim), Remy Briggs (Baby Katie Zim), Caleb Brown (Mikey), Joseph Leo Bwarie (Principal Bobby Lee), Jesse Case (Rachel), Sarah Chalke (Gabi), Hector Elizondo (Lance Wallace), Cameron Esposito (Max), Adam Freeman (HSN Host Adam Freeman), Gary Friedkin (Shorty), Jennifer Garner (2nd Lt. Dana Barton), Lisa Roberts Gillian (Assistant Betty), Adreana Gonzalez (Publicist Inez), Suzanne Haring (Bella the Balloon Lady), Tom Hines (Brady), Kate Hudson (Jesse), Mia Jackson (herself), Genevieve Joy (herself), Beth Kennedy (Gwenda), Siena LaGambina (Paige), Kate Linder (Dog Walker Gigi), Loni Love (Kimberly), Jon Lovitz (Wally Burn), Natalie Machado (Soccer Referee Lisa), Aasif Mandvi (Russell), Penny Marshall (Narrator), Sam Marshall (Sam), Margo Martindale (Flo), Drew Matthews (Beanzie), Shay Mitchell (Tina), Ariana Neal (Evette), Anoush NeVart (Sonia), Timothy Olyphant (Henry), Robert Pine (Earl), Julia Roberts (Miranda), Britt Robertson (Kristin), Graydon Russell (Tommy), Gianna Simone (Val), Brandon Spink (Peter), Jason Sudeikis (Bradley), Sandra Taylor (Lexy), Owen Vaccaro (Charlie), Paul Vogt (Tiny), Matthew Walker (Randy The Clown), Lucy Walsh (Jody), David Wedil (Dog Walker Leah), Jack Whitehall (Zack)

Runtime: 118 mins

Classification: M




David Griffiths:

Over the past few years Garry Marshall’s movies haven’t always been easy to watch. The man who once brought as classic television shows like Happy Days and The Odd Couple has turned to a lazy style of filmmaking which has seen him use the quantity of stars to get people into the cinema rather than the quality of the film. The result has been films like New Year’s Eve and Valentine’s Day which while have had star power but haven’t exactly been the most captivating films to watch.

It was because of that style of filmmaking that has meant that Mother’s Day has virtually been released in Australia with very little fanfare at all, a surprise when you realise that it stars three regular box office winners – Jennifer Aniston (We’re The Millers), Julia Roberts (Pretty Woman) and Kate Hudson (Almost Famous). If you are one of those people that have been a little bit worried about going to see Mother’s Day you can relax because this is one of Marshall’s better modern day films.

The film centres around a number of characters as Mother’s Day rapidly approaches. There is Jesse (Kate Hudson) and her sister Gabi (Sarah Chalke – Scrubs) who haven’t seen their parents in years because of their secret lives they know that their parents would not approve them. There is also Sandy (Jennifer Aniston) who is left reeling after she discovers that her ex-husband (Timothy Olyphant – Hitman) has just re-married the much younger Tina (Shay Mitchell – Pretty Little Liars) which means her children know have a second mother. Then there is Bradley (Jason Sudeikis – Horrible Bosses) who has been left trying to bring up his daughters after the death of his mother while Zack (Jack Whitehall – Fresh Meat) struggles to comprehend why the mother of his daughter, Kristin (Britt Robertson – The Longest Ride) refuses to marry him. Last but not least there is Miranda (Julia Roberts), the television show host that brings the ensemble all together.

After watching Mother’s Day i found myself sitting down and going over the film like a crime scene. Why did Mother’s Day work so well when Marshall’s previous films have been such lame ducks. The first thing I realised was the fact that Mother’s Day seems to flow a lot smoother than the previously mentioned films. Some of the links between characters in the other films have been pretty lame where as in Mother’s Day the relationships are not only believable but help the film’s storyline to move along rather than get in the way of it.

There also seems to be a lot more heart and humor in the film this time around which in the end makes the whole film seem a whole lot more realistic. While the story revolving around Bradley might not be as well presented as the similar story in Steve Carrell’s Dan In Real Life Sudeikis does manage to mix comedy with some truly emotional scenes. Likewise Sarah Chalke and Kate Hudson brilliantly portray two sisters sadly forced to live secret lives despite the fact they live in modern times. Like Sudeikis the two manage to amazingly combine comedy with some scenes that are powerful enough to really upset anybody who has had similar things happen in their lives.

Perhaps the biggest breath of fresh air in Mother’s Day are the acting performances of Britt Robertson and Jack Whitehall. Whitehall largely comes from a comedy background and while he plays a stand-up comedian in Mother’s Day he shows a new side to his talents by also expertly portraying a lot of the more emotional scenes that he shares with Britt Robertson who is almost unrecognisable compared to the roles that she has recently played in Tomorrowland and The Longest Ride.

Marshall really does find the right mix of comedy and drama and manages to make Mother’s Day a credible film that is a joy to watch. This is a film that you can easily become emotionally involved with and with great acting performances from the likes of Aniston, Hudson and Sarah Chalke this is actually a film that you won’t groan at if someone in your family decides that want to watch it every Mother’s Day. Garry Marshall take a bow you have finally learnt how to make a good ensemble film.





Greg King:

Mother’s Day is the third film in director Garry Marshall’s unofficial trilogy based around Hallmark-like “special events” holidays, and it follows the bland template established by the romcom Valentine’s Day and New Year’s Eve. All three films are multi-character narratives with interwoven storylines and a star studded ensemble cast in which a bevy of A-listers vie for screen time. In terms of quality thoughMother’s Day falls somewhere between the superior Valentine’s Day and the lacklustre New Year’s Eve, which seem a little contrived by comparison.

Given the title it’s not surprising that all of the narrative strands here revolve around different concepts of motherhood, maternal responsibilities, complex mother and child relationships, and the daily struggles of motherhood. The formulaic script has been written by four writers including Anya Kochoff Romano (Monster-in-Law) and three first time screenwriters in actor turned writer Tom Hines (a regular in many of Marshall’s films), Lily Hollander, and Matthew Walker, which accounts for a slight unevenness in tone at times.

The film is set in Atlanta and centres around a number of middle class women during the days leading up to the titular celebration day.

Jesse (Kate Hudson) and her sister Gabi (Sarah Chalke, from Scrubs, etc) live next to each other, and they haven’t seen their parents for a couple of years, mainly because they fear that their judgemental mother (Margot Martindale) will disapprove of their lifestyle choices. Jesse has married Russell (Aasif Mandvi), a doctor of Indian descent with whom she has a young son, while Gabi is gay and married to her girlfriend Max (Cameron Esposito). But when their parents unexpectedly stop by for a surprise visit the scene is set for some emotional upheavals and broad racist humour before a reconciliation can be affected.

Sandy (Jennifer Aniston) is divorced from her husband Henry (Timothy Olyphant, from tv’s Justified, etc), but they seem to share a good relationship. But then Sandy is shocked to learn that he has married the much younger Tina (Shay Mitchell, from Pretty Little Liars, etc). She is a little jealous and even bitter at having to share her two sons with their new stepmother who is barely out of puberty herself.

Bradley (Jason Sudeikis) is a physical trainer still recovering from the death of his wife (a cameo from Jennifer Garner), a soldier who was killed in action in Afghanistan a year ago. He is something of a mister mum, trying to raise his two daughters, but struggling to keep it all together. Several of the women at the gym where he works are trying to fix him up with a suitable partner. But as Mother’s Day approaches, Bradley is not sure how to handle his emotions.

Zack (Jack Whitehall) works in a bar but is also an aspiring stand up comic. He wants to marry his girlfriend Kristin (Britt Robertson, from The Last Ride, etc), who is the mother of his young daughter. But Kristin was adopted as a child and is still suffering from some abandonment issues. She is reluctant to marry him until she can come to terms with who she is.

The link that draws all these various characters together is Miranda (Julia Roberts), the popular host of a television home shopping network program and celebrity author.

The cast do what they can with their at times cliched characters. Aniston is a familiar figure in romcoms, and fittingly most of the best moments and best lines are given to her character. She manages to bring the material alive whenever she is on screen. Hector Elizondo, who has appeared in all of Marshall’s films, has a small role here as Miranda’s increasingly exasperated manager.

This is surprisingly lazy filmmaking from veteran Marshall, who of course gave us such classic television sitcoms as Happy Days, Mork And Mindy and The Odd Couple, and big screen romantic comedies like the classic Pretty WomanMother’s Day is suffused with his trademark mix of humour and warmth. Here he juggles his large cast and multi story lines deftly enough, and gives us a mix of slapstick humour mixed with sentimentality that sometimes slips into mawkishness.





Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)


IMDB Rating: Mother's Day (2016) on IMDb


Other Subculture Entertainment Mother’s Day reviews: You can also listen to our full Mother’s Day review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #174.


The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘A Month Of Sundays,’ ‘Captain America: Civil War,’ and ‘Mother’s Day’. This episode also contains interviews with Robert Downey Jnr., Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson, Jennifer Aniston, Kate Hudson and Britt Robertson.

Also make sure you are listening this week for your chance to win a The Man Who Knew Infinity  pack thanks to our good friends from Icon. The pack contains a double pass for you to go and see The Man Who Knew Infinity and copies of Slumdog Millionaire, The World’s Fastest Indian, The Motorcycle Diaries, Nowhere Boy, Love & Mercy and I’m Not There on DVD. The pack is worth $140. To win just listen to this week’s episode of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show, and tell us how many stars Adam gives Captain America: Civil War and then private message us your answers on either our Facebook or Twitter pages.

You can listen to the show or download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Kung Fu Panda 3

Summary: Continuing his “legendary adventures of awesomeness”, Po must face two hugely epic, but different threats: one supernatural and the other a little closer to his home.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd March 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, China

Director: Alessandro Carloni, Jennifer Yuh Nelson

Screenwriter: Jonathan Aibel, Glenn Berger

Cast: Jack Black (Po (voice)), Jackie Chan (Monkey (voice)), Radzi Chinyanganya (Mi (voice)), Bryan Cranston (Li (voice)), David Cross (Crane (voice)), Barbara Dirickson (Grandma Panda (voice)), Steele Gagnon (Bao (voice)), Willie Geist (Dim (voice)), Dustin Hoffman (Shifu (voice)), April Hong (Mrs. Chow (voice)),  James Hong (Mr. Ping (voice)), Kate Hudson (Mei Mei (voice)), Angelina Jolie (Tigress (voice)), Knox Jolie-Pitt (Ku Ku (voice)), Pax Jolie-Pitt (Yoo (voice)), Shiloh Jolie-Pitt (Shuai Shuai (voice)), Zahara Jolie-Pitt (Meng Meng (voice)), Randall Duk Kim (Oogway (voice)), Liam Knight (Lei Lei (voice)), Wayne Knight (Big Fun/Hom-Lee (voice)), Lucy Liu (Viper (voice)), Seth Rogen (Mantis (voice)), Al Roker (Sum (voice)), Lindsey Russell (Peony (voice)), J.K. Simmons (Kai (voice)), Fred Tatasciore (Master Bear (voice)), Ming Tsai (Ming (voice)), Jean-Claude Van Damme (Mast Croc (voice))

Runtime: 95 mins

Classification: PG




John Noonan:

Five years since he last skiddooed onto the scene, Po the Panda is back and this time, for fear of sounding like a movie poster, he’s bringing the whole family. Yes, a chance encounter at his adoptive father’s restaurant leads  Po (Jack Black) to meeting up with his long lost Dad, Li Shan (Bryan Cranston). Meanwhile, the vengeful spirit of a great warrior known as Kai (JK Simmons) has returned to the mortal realm and is seeking to steal Po’s chi.

This is the second sequel to DreamWorks’s 2008 hit and it’s amazing to see the difference between this and their previous flagship series, Shrek. By the time Shrek coughed and spluttered into his third sequel, the franchise was nothing more than weak storylines on which to pin dated pop culture references and Eel songs.

Conversely, Kung Fu Panda 3 allows Po and his pals to grow organically. Despite being declared Dragon Warrior in the previous film, there’s still much for the young panda to learn. Including it seems, that of how to be a panda. With his newly found father, Po ventures to their secret village in the hills to understand panda nature (tips include that they don’t do stairs and they don’t get up before midday) and potentially learn something that can defeat Kai.

Yes, this ‘just be yourself’ through line is a tried and tested formula, but it’s yet to feel derivate in the Panda universe. Po, despite his prowess, is a still a student. He has questions about his place in the universe that he hopes to answer. Meanwhile, there is only so many ways to you teach an ogre that’s okay to be an ogre, as long as you change yourself a bit.

Kung Fu Panda 3, as has become expected, is beautiful with traditional animation – admittedly done by computers – used for line drawn flashbacks. It’s a simple trick, but one that is used to great and emotional effect. Elsewhere the vocal talent is uniformly brilliant, with JK Simmons sounding like he’s channelling the angriest of angry John Goodmans, whilst James Hong steals every scene as Po’s adoptive father, Mr Ping; who doesn’t take kindly to others cutting his grass.

Rumours are that DreamWorks’s have at least another three chapters in the story of Po, and whilst that is a tempting offer, should they never surface, rest assured Kung Fu Panda 3 is a wonderful and joyous ending to a truly enjoyable series of films.




Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)


IMDB Rating: Kung Fu Panda 3 (2016) on IMDb


Other Subculture Entertainment Kung Fu Panda 3 reviews: Nil


The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Jodorowsky’s Dune’, ”Wish I Was Here,’ ‘The Immigrant,’ ‘The Maze Runner,’ ‘Sin City: A Dame To Kill For,’ ‘The Boxtrolls,’ ‘Planes: Fire & Rescue,’ ‘We Are The Best’ and ‘The Infinite Man′ . This episode also contains an interview with Zach Braff, Kate Hudson, Dylan O’Brien, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Bruce Willis and Hugh Sullivan.

Also make sure you take a listen to see what you need to do to win a copy of Romeo + Juliet on DVD thanks to Icon Distribution.

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here

Abigail Breslin

It is always an interesting moment for film lovers when an actress they have watched grow up on the screen suddenly makes their first ‘grown-up film’. That recently happened for fans of young star Abigail Breslin, whether she was cracking gags in “Little Miss Sunshine” or fighting zombies in “Zombieland” there has always been an air of innocence around the characters that Breslin has portrayed. It was therefore a shock to many when they sat down to watch crime thriller “The Call” and saw a very grown-up Breslin appear in her underwear while being menaced by a serial killer.
Abigail Kathleen Breslin was born on the 14th April, 1996 in New York City. She is the daughter of Michael and Kim Breslin, her mother is a housewife and her father is a computer programmer who works in the telecommunications field. It has also been revealed that Abigail was named after former First Lady of The United States Abigail Adams.
The acting bug really did bite Abigail Breslin at a very early age – not surprising when you consider that her brothers Ryan and Spencer are also actors. Abigail made her first acting appearance at the age of three when she appeared in a ‘Toys ‘R’ Us’ commercial, and it obviously made a huge impact because soon she was being cast by director M. Night Shyamalen to appear in his 2002 alien suspense film “Signs” alongside Mel Gibson. The film not only made $408 million at the box office but also saw Breslin receive praise for her performance from film critics and journalists right around the world.
Despite early success in the feature film world Breslin then decided to appear in television shows such as “Hack”, “What I Like About You”, “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” and “NCIS” before again returning to the big screen in “Raising Helen” (with Kate Hudson), “Keane” and “The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement”, the latter film introducing her to a much younger film base and also making her one of the most popular younger Hollywood stars.
After more television appearances, this time on “Ghost Whisperer” and “Grey’s Anatomy” Breslin then once again impressed critics with her portrayal of a young Olive Hoover in the surprise hit “Little Miss Sunshine”. Her role in “Little Miss Sunshine” also saw her receive an Academy Award nomination. Now with the world at her feet Breslin appeared in lesser known movies “The Ultimate Gift” and “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” before playing ‘adopted daughter’ to Catherine Zeta-Jones in “No Reservations” and then starring alongside Ryan Reynolds in “Definitely, Maybe”.
In 2008 Breslin again got in touch with her younger fans when she played Eco-warrior Nim in the well received “Nim’s Island” and since then has appeared in a string of hits including “My Sister’s Keeper”, “Zombieland”, “New Year’s Eve” and of course recent release “The Call”. Over the years Breslin has also showed that she is a talented voice artist and has lent her voice to films such as “Air Buddies”, “Quantum Quest: A Cassini Space Odyssey”, “Rango” and also the underrated “Zambezia”.
Outside of acting Breslin has shown a real love for animals and it is understood that she is wanting to study to become a veterinarian although she has also gone on the record saying that if she wasn’t an actress she would also be interested in becoming a fashion designer. Breslin has also revealed that she is a talented musician and performs in a band called CABB with her best friend Cassidy Reiff.
Fans of Abigail Breslin better get used to her playing more grown-up characters from now on. She will soon be seen on the big screen in another thriller called “Final Girl” before appearing alongside Harrison Ford in action science fiction “Ender’s Game” and then with Juliette Lewis, Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts in comedy drama “August: Osage County”. She is also currently working on Mark Young’s “Wicked Blood” and is also set to star with Arnold Schwarznegger in “Maggie” and the apocalyptic “Peste”. Yes, if you’re an Abigail Breslin fan you’ll be buying a lot of cinema tickets over the next twelve months.

The Reluctant Fundamentalist

Summary: Set in the years following 9/11, The Reluctant Fundamentalist follows a young Pakistani man, Changez, chasing corporate success on Wall Street. Living in the suspicious, terrorism-altered Western world, he ultimately finds himself embroiled in a conflict between his American Dream, a hostage crisis, and the enduring call of his family’s homeland.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd May, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA/UK/Qatar

Director: Mira Nair

Screenwriter: Ami Boghani, Mohsin Hamid, Rutvik Oza, William Wheeler

Cast: Riz Ahmed (Changez), Shabana Azmi (Ammi), Ashwath Bhatt (Junaid), Haluk Bilginer (Nazmi Kemal), Vince Canlas (Kenzaburo), Deepti Datt (Amreh), Martin Donovan (Ludlow Cooper), Nelsan Ellis (Wainwright), Rohan Gupta (Rahim), Kate Hudson (Erica), Adil Hussain (Mustafa Fazil), Liam Ireson (Chris), Sonya Jehan (Nadia),  Clayton Landey (Agent Jackson), Om Puri (Abu), Claire Roberts Lamont (June Davis), Rory McCreray (Agent Ford), Cody W. Parker (Herman), Sarah Quinn (Clea), Gary Richardson (Anse Rainier), Liev Schreiber (Bobby Lincoln), Ali Sethi (Ahmed), Meesha Shafi (Bina), Imaad Shah (Sameer), Victor Slezak (Maxwell Underwood), Chris Smith (Mike Rizzo), Kiefer Sutherland (Jim Cross)

Runtime: 126 mins



Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2012) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist′: Check Episode #33 (available late on 23rd May) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist’.