Tagged: Liam Garrigan

Summary: A deadly threat from Earth’s history reappears, and a hunt for a lost artifact takes place between Autobots and Decepticons, while Optimus Prime encounters his creator in space.

Year: 2017

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st June 2017

Australian DVD Release Date: 4th October 2017

Country: United States, China, Canada

Director: Michael Bay

Screenwriter: Matt Holloway, Art Marcum, Ken Nolan, Akiva Goldsman (story)

Cast: Erik Adahl (Bumblebee voice)), Daniel Adegboyega (Saebert), Gil Birmingham (Chief Sherman), Steve Buscemi (Daytrader voice)), Santiago Cabrera (Santos), Jerrod Carmichael (Jimmy), Jim Carter (Cogman voice)), Gemma Chan (Quintessa), Peter Cullen (Optimus Prime (voice)), John DiMaggio (Nitro Zeus/Crosshairs voice)), Josh Duhamel (Colonel William Lennox), Dino Fazzini (Alden), Marcus Fraser (Gawain), Rebecca Front (Aunt Marie), Liam Garrigan (Arthur), John Goodman (Hound voice)), Minti Gorne (Young Viviane), Laura Haddock (Vivian Wembley), Jess Harnell (Barricade voice)), Richard Hills Jnr. (Cheldric), John Hollingworth (Tristan), Sir Anthony Hopkins (Sir Edmund Barton), Tom Kenny (Wheels voice)), Jason Matthewson (Spenser), Martin McCreadie (Lancelot), Isabela Moner (Izabella), Glenn Morshower (General Morshower), Phoebe Nicholls (Aunt Helen), Allen Phoenix (Luke Reynolds), Jade Quon (Cogman), Trent Seven (Hengist), Omar Sy (Hot Rod voice)),  Stanley Tucci (Merlin), John Turturro (Agent Simmons), Mark Wahlberg (Cade Yaeger), Ken Watanabe (Drift voice)), Frank Welker (Megatron voice)), Reno Wilson (Mohawk/Sqweeks voice)), Rob Witcomb (Percival)

Runtime: 154 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Kyle McGrath’s Transformers: The Last Knight Review:

Despite his negative reputation as a filmmaker I consider myself to be a fan of a lot of Michael Bay’s films. Bad Boys, Pain & Gain, The Rock, 13 Hours and even Armageddon are all films I have enjoyed. He’s drawn the ire of some film fans however with films like Pearl Harbour (which I’ve not seen) and the incredibly popular Transformers franchise.

Transformers The Last Knight is the fifth film in the live action Transformers film series. Continuing on with new series protagonist from the previous film, Cade Yeager (Mark Wahlberg), this film sees the good autobots still lumped together with the villainous decepticons and outlawed by mankind in the wake of collateral damage which they seem to have brought to earth. Leader of the autobots, Optimus Prime, upon completing his long journey back to the Transformer’s home planet of Cybertron is captured by a new enemy with plans to use him in her plan to destroy earth.

The film proceeds more or less as anyone who has seen any the previous 4 films might expect. Having not fully enjoyed the series up til now I found myself once again disappointed in the development of the story, characters and the comedic relief which still comes off as inappropriate either in timing or in content (although perhaps not quite as bad this time as cutaway shots to dogs humping or John Turturro talking about robot testicles as we saw in the franchise’s second instalment).

The over the top action which Bay and this series are both known for of course returns as well. I must say that the mixing of CGI and live action which has always been impressive still excels if you stop to appreciate the movie on such a technical level.

That is if you can actually keep track of what is going on. I’m not sure if this has something to do with the film having 6 different editors but I felt like I was inside the head of a schizophrenic at times with how the movie is shot, edited and jumps from one plot thread to another.

Something I’ve noticed with the story of each of these films is that every single one of them presents a new revelation on how long Transformers have actually been on earth. They were here building the pyramids, they were the true reason for man walking on the moon, they were here with the dinosaurs and now they were instrumental in the legend of King Arthur. I believe these revelations are to make the audience not think that the world would be a much better place, and avoid periodical catastrophic events killing thousands, if the Transformers would simply leave. Each film needs a new reason for them to be here and after a while they’re starting to pile up on each other and conflict.

On top of that it means every film feels too heavy with exposition as this new reason needs to be explained though in such a way which won’t completely bore the fans who are there for the action. This is where the inappropriate timing of humour comes in as the movie can’t go too long without the equivalent of a pie in the face gag.

Characters both human and robotic are introduced and dropped frequently. Rather than focusing more on key players we’re aquatinted with more supporting characters who don’t appear to serve much of a purpose and disappear from the film before they do. John Turturro & Josh Duhamel both series regulars who were absent from the previous film round out the cast but again don’t do much.

This wouldn’t be too much of an issue but as a result the role of major characters like Vivian Wembley (Laura Haddock) seem rushed or are flat out absent from most of the film in the case of Optimus Prime or the leader of the decepticons, Megatron.

Optimus in particular whom I’ve never thought was handled well in any of the films barely makes an appearance til past the halfway mark then 10 minutes later he’s back to making these forced rallying speeches to motivate the troops to go into the final battle when he hasn’t earned the right to take on that leader role.

I think a problem with the Transformers film franchise for a lot of people has been the lack of genuine passion for what was going on. The films are visually stunning and often exhausting to watch as the staggering amount of man hours which have gone into creating them is clear to see. But at the same time they can feel hollow and boring.

When the recent Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles live action films, themselves produced by Michael Bay, were announced the details of changes to the established ideas of the property caused an uproar. In time this led to the decision to shift gears and so the sequel from the ground up was crafted with die hard fans of TMNT in mind. Familiar villains, heroes, monsters and even the theme song which any fan would know off by heart were included and I believe this made a much more enjoyable film in the process.

The Transformers films have never had this reinvention because they never really needed to being the franchise was always so popular despite negativity from some audiences. This sums up my thoughts on Transformers The Last Knight. If you have enjoyed the franchise up till now then you will definitely enjoy this latest addition. However, unlike with Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows, I can’t think of a reason to recommend this sequel to anyone who has felt let down by the series up till now.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:  

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Transformers: The Last Knight (2017) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Transformers: The Last Knight Reviews: N/A

 

Trailer:

The Legend Of Hercules

Summary: The origin story of the the mythical Greek hero. Betrayed by his stepfather, the King, and exiled and sold into slavery because of a forbidden love, Hercules must use his formidable powers to fight his way back to his rightful kingdom.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 20th February, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Renny Harlin

Screenwriter: Sean Hood, Renny Harlin, Daniel Giat, Giulio Steve

Cast: Scott Adkins (King Amphitryon), Kenneth Cranham (Lucius), Dimiter Doichinov (King Galenus/Champion #1), Mariah Gale (Kakia), Saria Givaty (Saphirra), Liam Garrigan (Iphicles), Mihail Georgiev (Hercules), Boris Ivanov (Hercules (Alcides) (New Born)/Hercules’ Son (New Born), Kellan Lutz (Hercules), Liam McIntyre (Sotiris), Roxanne McKee (Queen Alcmene), Luke Newberry (Agamemnon), Radoslav Parvanov (Half Face), Nikolay Petkov (Iphicles – 2 Years Old), Johnathon Schaech (Tarak), Rade Serbedzija (Chiron), Nikolai Sotirov (King Tallas), Dena Stoyanova (Hercules (Alcides) (New Born)), Gaia Weiss (Hebe), Spencer Wilding (Humbaba)

Runtime: 99 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR THE LEGEND OF HERCULES REVIEWS & RATINGS

David Griffiths:

Sometimes after you watch a film you just have to shake your head. With The Legend Of Hercules it was obvious that there was some good intentions when the filmmakers started out, but along the way some fundamental mistakes were made. It’s just really strange that no one associated to the film ever seemed to notice that those mistakes were about to make it up onto the big screen.

Directed by Renny Harlin (the man who has delivered films such as Cliffhanger, The Long Kiss Goodnight and Die Hard 2) The Legend Of Hercules goes back to the beginning of the mythological legend and sees Hercules (Kellan Lutz) as a young warrior that is an outcast from both his father, King Amphitryon (Scott Adkins) and his brother Iphicles (Liam Garrigan) whom both know that his mother Queen Alcmene (Roxanne McKee) was unfaithful. What they don’t realise is that Hercules has actually been fathered by Zeus the God of all Gods.

When Iphicles and Amphitryon see that Hercules is developing a relationship with the young princess Hebe (Gaia Weiss) they conspire to send him to a battle that will result in his death. But when Hercules and Sotiris (Liam McIntyre) miraculously live the pair find themselves sold into the gladiator market and try to find a way to get back to Greece to rescue Hebe before she is forced to marry Iphicles and to free the people from the reign of King Amphitryon.

So just how bad is The Legend Of Hercules? Well to be honest there is so much wrong with the film that it becomes laughable. At time the special effects look like somebody left the work experience student have a go at creating them while at times shots have been included that crazily mix up the continuity in a way seldom seen on the screen before. To the naked eye it appears that some hastily put together re-shoots may have been done, but sadly they were pieces that just didn’t fit into this jigsaw at all.

The strange thing is though at times the film’s story does actually capture the imagination of the audience but then that illusion is shattered by an inconsistent script that at times seems like the screenwriter was trying to capture the language of Shakespeare while at other times seems to be lifted straight from dialogue spoken on television shows such as Days Of Our Lives or The Young And The Restless. Something that also seems to shatter the imagination of the audience is the fact that Renny Harlin seems to stoop the very low filmmaking technique of turning to slow-motion whenever a blow is delivered in battle… it happens so often it becomes nauseating.

Last but not least there is the acting. The choice of leading man is a bizarre one. Before this film Kellan Lutz was mainly known as playing ‘the big blonde vampire’ in the The Twilight Saga series of films and now he has been thrust into this film and the new Tarzan film as an action hero. While Lutz may carry of the physicality of Hercules his acting isn’t exactly top notch, but even he looks like an Oscar winner alongside some of the other performances in this film. It soon becomes painfully obvious to the audience that Gaia Weiss was only cast in her role because of her looks while Roxanne McKee’s accent seems to change every time she is on the screen. Then there’s Scott Adkins and Liam Garrigan who badly play token bad guys. At least Aussie actor Liam McIntyre actually tries as he portrays Hercules’ trusty side-kick.

The Legend Of Hercules will no doubt go down as one of the worst films of 2014, but the scary thing about this film is that nobody at the studio seemed to realise what a dog they were releasing.

Stars(2)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2)

IMDB Rating: The Legend of Hercules (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Legend Of Hercules′: Nil.

Trailer: