Tagged: Marcia Gay Harden

featureAfter Words

A brand new After Words trailer has just been released. The romance which is set in Costa Rica is directed by Juan Feldman and stars Marcia Gay Harden and Oscar Jaenada. It is set for release in late 2015.

You can view the After Words trailer below.

Fifty Shades Of Grey

Summary:  Based on the popular series of novels by E.L. James Fifty Shades Of Grey is told by the perspective of Anastasia Steele (Dakota Johnson) a young college student whose life is changed forever when her housemate, Kate (Eloise Mumford) asks her to fill in for her and do an interview with the mysterious Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan).

To her surprise the virginal Anastasia feels a connection with Christian and while at first it seems they are about to enter a seemingly normal relationship things seem to be held by Christian refusing to give in to his feelings. Soon Anastasia discovers that Christian has a hidden side of his life, a side that excites her but a side that isn’t sure whether she wants to be part of or not.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 12th February, 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Sam Taylor-Johnson

Screenwriter: Kelly Marcel, E.L. James (novel)

Cast: Andrew Airlie (Mr. Grey), Elliat Albrecht (Olivia), Bruce Dawson (Mr. Clayton), Anne Marie DeLuise (Dr. Greene), Jamie Dornan (Christian Grey), Jennifer Ehle (Carla), Emily Fonda (Martina), Luke Grimes (Elliott Grey), Marcia Gay Harden (Mrs. Grey), Dakota Johnson (Anastasia Steele), Anthony Konechny (Paul Clayton), Max Martini (Taylor), Eloise Mumford (Kate), Dylan Neal (Bob), Rita Ora (Mia Grey), Victor Rasuk (Jose), Callum Keith Rennie (Ray), Rachel Skarsten (Andrea)

Runtime: 125 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR FIFTY SHADES OF GREY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Worst nightmare or most eagerly anticipated film of the year? There seems to be no middle ground with Fifty Shades Of Grey and that in turn has become a dangerous thing. Some movie markets around the world decided that this movie was so critic proof that they wouldn’t even run any Media Screenings of the film something that you can only wonder has led to some critics scratching their claws and belting this film into submission as only Christian Grey could. But this is a film that also raises another pretty serious question as well. Did critics go into the film wanting to bash it, because there is no way that this film has deserved the one and half star reviews that it has been picking up.

Let’s be honest Fifty Shades Of Grey is not a brilliant film, but it is an interesting film and director Sam Taylor-Johnson and screenwriter Kelly Marcel (who also wrote the brilliant Saving Mr. Banks) have done all they can to turn what is pretty much a trashy novel into something worthy of watching on the big screen.

Credit does need to be paid to Taylor-Johnson and Marcel as this could have very easily turned into the kind of film that would be frequented by men wearing rain-coats instead of becoming what it has – an intriguing film that although billed to be a sex romp has enough storyline with it to become a Notebook-esque film with whips and chains. The fact is though that Marcel realises early on that this film wouldn’t work if it were simply just bondage sex scene after bondage sex scene so she does something you feel that many screenwriters wouldn’t and brings a great deal of characterization into the film. In turn the audience find themselves embedded in this strange relationship and certainly wants to know what is going to happen next.

Marcel’s screenplay also takes this film into some dark areas, but not the ones that many have decided to throw at this film before they haven’t seen it. Fifty Shades Of Grey is never a film that glorifies rape, sexual abuse or domestic violence, instead it becomes the character study of a man damaged by sexual abuse himself and the impact that it has on his adult relationships. It also becomes a film that explores the sexual awakening of a young woman in a way that has been previously glimpsed at in films such as The Story Of O and Secretary. This character driven storyline and the strong almost suspense feeling generated by the ‘will they, won’t they’ aspect of the film certainly lifts the film above what many thought it would turn out to be.

The knives have also been out for Jamie Dornan whom many believe doesn’t really fit the role of Christian Grey. But really he isn’t as bad as many has said he has been. Sure he may not have the charisma of someone like a Ryan Gosling but watching this film soon makes you realise that neither does Grey. Grey isn’t a flamboyant Bruce Wayne like millionaire he’s more your brooding David Boreanaz style wealth monger and Dornan pulls that off fairly well.

The star here though is Dakota Johnson. The star on the rise who has previously had smaller roles in films like Need For Speed, The Social Network and 21 Jump Street really announces herself in a role that does actually test her as an actress. Johnson is called upon to deliver most of the nudity and she doesn’t flinch once while also delivering a performance that most young actresses in a romantic role would be more than happy with.

Strangely while Fifty Shades Of Grey has been savaged you get an eerie feeling after watching it that had this been a French film with subtitles and not based on books that have been labeled ‘Mummy porn’ than this would have been a film that many critics may have warned to for it’s risqué content. As a film though Fifty Shades Of Grey is serviceable, the characters are likable and the storyline intriguing. Plus the best way to show how is does work is that if you stick to the end there is a good chance you’ll want to know where the story ends up… so hopefully that make a sequel and don’t leave us dangling… from Grey’s roof.

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Fifty Shades of Grey (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Fifty Shades Of Grey reviews: You can also read our Fifty Shades of Grey review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Magic In The Moonlight

Summary: An uptight English magician (Firth), who prides himself on knowing the detail behind every popular illusion, reconnects with an old colleague while on tour in Europe. Intrigued by the story of a young spirit medium (Stone) who claims to be able to speak with the dead husband of a wealthy widow (Weaver), the pair travel to the sun-dappled coastal villa of the family to assist in unmasking this possible swindle. Set during the 1920s against a backdrop of the Côte d’Azur, glorious provincial mansions, garden parties and fashionable jazz joints,

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th August, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Woody Allen

Screenwriter: Woody Allen

Cast: Eileen Atkins (Aunt Vanessa), Colin Firth (Stanley), Marcia Gay Harden (Mrs. Baker), Erica Leerhsen (Caroline), Hamish Linklater (Brice), Simon McBurney (Howard Burkan), Catherine McCormack (Olivia), Jeremy Shamos (George), Emma Stone (Sophie), Jacki Weaver (Grace)

Runtime: 97 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Magic In The Moonlight review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #94

Stars(3.5)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Magic In The Moonlight review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #94

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

It seems like talented actor/director Woody Allen really is Mr. Teflon. The scandals that have plagued his personal life over the years would have been enough to bring other filmmaker’s careers crashing down around them. They would have become box office poison and eventually been shunned by film studios right around the world.

That certainly hasn’t happened with Allen though who has instead just merrily gone about his business churning out at least one film a year for as long as I can remember. The good thing about that though is that even with age the level of greatness he has managed to bring to each of his films has never dropped. Over recent years he has proved that with films such as To Rome With Love, Midnight In Paris and Vicky Cristina Barcelona which have all been absolute gems.

Now comes Magic In The Moonlight a film that sees Allen drag his audience make into the roaring 1920s as he tells the story of the talented yet seemingly perennially grumpy Stanley (Colin Firth) who is brought in to investigate the claims by a young girl named Sophie (Emma Stone) who says that she is able to predict people’s futures with her connection to the ‘universe.’

With a rich family, including young Brice (Hamish Linklater), believing every word that Sophie says and now giving her money for her services Stanley’s good friend Howard (Simon McBurney) demands that he investigates her.

Not only does Allen make sure the set design for this period is absolutely spot on but he has also delivered a film that almost feels like it was made back in these times as well. A time when filmmakers knew that a good script and some great acting were far more important to the audience then special effects or the like. In fact if Allen had filmed Magic In The Moonlight in the black-and-white you could have been excused for thinking the film was a re-born classic. Yes, this isn’t the kind of film that you want to watch in the latest multiplex cinema, to get the true beauty of this film you really need to hunt down the oldest theatre in your city and go watch it there.

Having praised Mr. Allen to high heaven though it is worth pointing out that Magic In The Moonlight is not one of his finest films, but then even an ordinary Woody Allen film is usually better than most films out at the time. Still Magic In The Moonlight does have all the things that a true Allen fan looks for his films – the witty dialogue, the big twist and an air of mystery that only the masters of old can manage to create.

But there is one big weakness with Magic In The Moonlight, and that is the romance element. It does work and despite some fears that whole idea of Colin Firth and Emma Stone coming together isn’t as gag worthy as what we had to sit through with Zeta-Jones and Connery in Entrapment, but the romantic element of the film seems to be the only reason that the last quarter of the film has been tacked on. Once the big reveal happens the romance seems unnecessary and as a result the ending of the film drags a little as all the suspense has already dissipated.

Just like all of Allen’s films though, he gets the best out of his cast. As usual Colin Firth is smooth and seems to enjoy the opportunity of delivering some of the catty lines that Allen’s script contains. At times it does feel like the screenplay has called upon Firth to almost parody the a 1920s gentlemen and he seems to do that well. He is also well supported by Emma Stone who seems to keep being able to silence her critics who cruelly suggest that she has better looks than talent. While she doesn’t exactly steal the show like she did in Easy A she again shows that she can move between comedy and drama in a heartbeat with ease.

Magic In The Moonlight is far from one of Woody Allen’s best films. The romance coming to the fore towards the end does let it down a little, but for the most part it does work. Just be warned that the film is aimed for an older demographic so if you are a little on the younger side this may not be the film for you.

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Magic in the Moonlight (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Magic In The Moonlight′: For our full Magic In The Moonlight review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #94. You can also read Dave’s Magic In The Moonlight review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

During The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Episode 43 the boys took a look at the most unlikable characters in cinema history – here are their lists.

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Dolores Umbridge

  • Darth Vader (David Prowse) – ‘Star Wars’ (1977)
  • Steve Stifler (Seann William Scott) – ‘American Pie’ (1999)
  • Cal Hockley (Billy Zane) – ‘Titanic’ (1997)
  • Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon) – ‘The Departed’ (2006)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Dolores Umbrige (Imelda Staunton) – ‘Harry Potter & The Order Of The Phoenix’ (2007)
  • Peter (Frank Giering) + Paul (Arno Frisch) – ‘Funny Games’ (1997)
  • Peter (Brady Corbet) + Paul (Michael Pitt) – ‘Funny Games’ (2007)
  • Mr. Harvey (Stanley Tucci) – ‘The Lovely Bones’ (2009)
  • Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson) – ‘Django Unchained’ (2012)
  • Begbie (Robert Carlyle) – ‘Trainspotting’ (1996)
  • Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale) ‘American Psycho’ (2000)
  • Sean Bateman (James Van Der Beek) ‘The Rules Of Attraction’ (2002)
  • Bill Sikes (Oliver Reed) – ‘Oliver!’ (1968)
  • Randall Boggs (Steve Buscemi) – ‘Monsters Inc.’ (2001)
  • Amon Goeth (Ralph Fiennes) – ‘Schindlers’ List’ (1993)
  • Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) – ‘Harry Potter Franchise’
  • Dennis Nedry (Wayne Knight) – Jurassic Park’ (1993)
  • Scar (Jeremy Irons) – ‘The Lion King’ (1994)
  • Kev (Hugo Weaving) – ‘Last Ride’ (2009)
  • Lou Ford (Casey Affleck) – ‘The Killer Inside Me’ (2010)

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Jeremy Renner - The Hurt Locker

  • Kev (Hugo Weaving) – ‘Last Ride’ (2009)
  • Begbie (Robert Carlyle) – ‘Trainspotting’ (1997)
  • Johnny Lawrence (William Zabka) – ‘The Karate Kid’ (1984)
  • Fred O’Bannon (Ben Affleck) – ‘Dazed And Confused’ (1993)
  • John Quincy Adams (Anthony Hopkins) – Amistad’ (1997)
  • Detective Sergeant Johnson (Sean Connery) – ‘The Offence’ (1972)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) – ‘The Social Network’ (2010)
  • Judd Raike (Karl Malen) – ‘Parrish’ (1961)
  • Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum) – ‘Jurassic Park’ (1993)
  • Shia LeBouf – Any movie he has made.
  • Sergeant First Class William James (Jeremy Renner) – ‘The Hurt Locker’ (2008)
  • John Bender (Judd Nelson) – ‘The Breakfast Club’ (1985)
  • Major Benson Payne (Damon Wayans) – ‘Major Payne’ (1995)
  • Happy Gilmore (Adam Sandler) – ‘Happy Gilmore’ (1996)
  • Johnny Quid (Toby Kebbell) – ‘RocknRolla’ (2008)
  • Juno (Ellen Page) – ‘Juno’ (2007)
  • Cereal (Matthew Lillard) – ‘Hackers’ (1995)
  • Leigh Anne Tuohy (Sandra Bullock) – ‘The Blind Side’ (2009)

 

GREG KING’S LIST

Jar Jar Binks

  • Col Nathan R. Jessup (Jack Nicholson) – ‘A Few Good Men’ (1992)
  • Trent (Steve Carell) – ‘The Way Way Back’ (2013)
  • Danny McBride (Danny McBride) – ‘This Is The End’ (2013)
  • Gny. Sgt. Hartman (R. Lee Ermey) – ‘Full Metal Jacket’ (1987)
  • Mr. Martin (R. Lee Ermey) – ‘Willard’ (2003)
  • Sgt. Fatso Judson (Ernst Borgnine) – ‘From Here To Eternity’ (1953)
  • Jar Jar Binks (Ahmed Best) – ‘Star Wars: Episode 1: The Phantom Menace’ (1999)
  • Ricky Bobby (Will Ferrell) – ‘Taladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby’ (2006)
  • Adam Sandler – Any movie he is in.
  • Ruby Rhod (Chris Tucker) – ‘The Fifth Element’ (1997)
  • Derek Zoolander (Ben Stiller) – ‘Zoolander’ (2001)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (Joaquin Phoenix) – ‘I’m Still Here’ (2010)
  • Napoleon Dynamite (Jon Heder) – ‘Napoleon Dynamite’ (2004)
  • Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman) – Rushmore’ (1998)
  • Steve Stifler (Seann William Scott) – ‘American Pie’ (1999)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Gary King (Simon Pegg) – ‘The World’s End’) (2013)
  • Mr. Yunioshi (Mickey Rooney) – ‘Breakfast At Tiffany’s’ (1961)
  • Gilbert Gottfried – any character
  • Kitai Raige (Jaden Smith) – ‘After Earth’ (2013)
  • Champ Kind (David Koechner) – ‘Anchorman: The Legend Of Ron Burgundy’ (2004)
  • Joe (Matthew McConnaughey) – ‘Killer Joe’ (2011)
  • Biff Tannen (Thomas F. Wilson) – ‘Back To The Future’ (1985)
  • Bob Oswald (Rory Kinnear) – ‘Broken’ (2012)

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Nurse Ratched

  • Jack Black – Everything he did early in his career
  • Begbie (Robert Carlyle) – ‘Trainspotting’ (1997)
  • Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) – ‘One Flew Of The Cuckoo’s Nest’ (1975)
  • Bogs Diamond (Mark Rolston) – ‘The Shawshank Redemption’ (1994)
  • Mrs. Carmody (Marcia Gay Harden) – The Mist’ (2007)
  • Percy Wetmore (Doug Hutchison) – ‘The Green Mile’ (1999)
  • Mick (Johnny Harris) – ‘This Is England ’86’ (2010)
  • James (Eddie Marsan) – ‘Tyrannosaur’ (2011)
  • Ace (Kiefer Sutherland) – ‘Stand By Me’ (1986)
  • Derek (Adam Scott) – ‘Step Brothers’ (2008)
  • Earline Fitzgerald (Margo Martindale) – ‘Million Dollar Baby’ (2004)
  • Dick Jones (Ronny Cox) – ‘RoboCop’ (1987)
  • Brad Wesley (Ben Gazzara) – Road House’ (1989)