Tagged: Max Bennett

 

Summary: A British drug lord tries to sell off his highly profitable empire to a dynasty of Oklahoma billionaires.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 1st January 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 30th January 2020

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Guy Ritchie

Screenwriter: Guy Ritchie, Ivan Atkinson (story), Marn Davies (story)

Cast: Childi Ajufo (Bunny), Brittany Ashworth (Ruby), George Asprey (Lord Snowball), Russell Balogh (Russell), Max Bennett (Brown), Bruce Chong (Npuc), Michelle Dockery (Rosalind Pearson), Gershwyn Eustache Jnr. (Roger), Christopher Evangelou (Primetime), Colin Farrell (Coach), Henry Golding (Dry Eye), Hugh Grant (Fletcher), Tom Rhys Harries (Power Noel), Charlie Hunnam (Ray), Togo Igawa (Wang Yong), Jack Jones (Nick), Eugenia Kuzmina (Misha), Matthew McConaughey (Mickey Pearson), Lyne Renee (Jackie), Jeremy Strong (Matthew), Eliot Sumner (Laura Pressfield), James Warren (Iron Chin), Samuel West (Lord Pressfield), Jason Wong (Phuc), Tom Wu (George), Jon Xue Zhang (Fat Tony)

Running Time: 113 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR THE GENTLEMEN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

Nobody quite does gangster film the way Guy Ritchie does. Ritchie basically made the genre his own after re-inventing it with modern day classics like Lock, Stock And Two Smoking Barrells and Snatch. And while cinema goers have enjoyed Ritichie’s take on Sherlock Holmes and The Man From U.N.C.L.E. nothing he has done in recent years has ever captured that true magic of his early films… that was until now. Yes The Gentlemen sees Ritchie return to the gangster genre but also sees him return to form with his creativity and stunning scriptwriting.

The film centres around Mickey Pearson (Matthew McConaughey – Dallas Buyers Club) a gangster who has built a budding marijuana business across England. However when Mickey is shot in a bar a private investigator turned wannaba screenwriter named Fletcher (Hugh Grant – Love Actually) is employed by a newspaper to investigate the case. Not happy with his fee though Fletcher decides to cash-in and try to blackmail Mickey’s right-hand man Ray (Charlie Hunnam – Pacific Rim) with a meandering tale that also involves other crime figures like Dry Eye (Henry Golding – Last Christmas) and Coach (Colin Farrell – The Lobster).

The Gentlemen screams creativity from the get go. Ritchie doesn’t make the film an easy watch for the audience. The story doesn’t play in order instead the audience is fed bits and pieces of information from a myriad of sources and at times it is up to them to work out what his truth or lie. Of course Ritchie also throws in the odd red herring to try and put you off the scent and the result is a heightened sense of suspense as you are never really sure what is true, right down to character’s deaths, until it is spelled out for you in actual black and white.

In true Ritchie style the way the plot is presented is also a stroke of genius. Having Fletcher recount the story for Ray not only gives the filmmaker a way to show the different variations of the truth in a creative way but also allows Grant and Hunnam to have an amazing screen presence that both actors seem to embrace with two hands. Grant is truly sensational and despite a long career to date this is easily his best ever role. While the film is not a comedy Grant uses his comedic timing to further enhance the character of Fletcher and make him someone truly memorable. Nearly all of the scenes that the two actors share together feel like an intense theatre production and there is no sign of weak acting anywhere to be seen.

Of course with the all the theatrics and creativity that Ritchie shows with this film he could probably be excused if it were being used to cover up a weak storyline but that certainly isn’t the case here. The story is an absolute gem, made up of unique characters who seem out to only aid their business dealings while not really caring what they do or who they have to crush to get what they want. And while there seems to be a never-ending amount of characters being included in the story you never seem to lose track of who is who and more importantly who works with who.

Anyone planning on going to see The Gentlemen should be warned though that while we have entered into a time of political correctness Ritchie seems to ignore that with this film. The language is perhaps the most extreme we have seen in cinema for awhile (but it does fit with the storyline) and of course this wouldn’t be a Ritchie gangster film if there wasn’t a couple of very violent on-screen deaths as well.

We mentioned earlier the brilliant performances of Grant and Hunnam but really there are a number of other actors who deserve credit for their work as well. Once again Matthew McConaughey shows why he is one of the best character actors going around at the moment while the big surprise here might be the performance of Henry Golding who breaks the shackles of his normal nice-guy persona by playing the very untrustworthy Dry Eye. Then of course there is Hollywood’s forgotten man Colin Farrell who seems to be having a ball playing the slimy Coach.

As far as gangster films go there are none better than The Gentlemen. This is a true cinema tour de force that delivers a headbutt to the face of its audience. It leaves in shock, it leaves you in awe but beyond all else this is a film that you will want to watch over and over again. Guy Ritchie is a true magician of a filmmaker and with The Gentlemen he delivers some good old-fashioned creative magic.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating: The Gentlemen (2020) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment The Gentlemen Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

Anna Karenina

Summary: The third collaboration of Academy Award nominee Keira Knightley with acclaimed director Joe Wright, following the award-winning boxoffice successes Pride & Prejudice and Atonement, is a bold, theatrical new vision of the epic story of love, adapted from Leo Tolstoy’s timeless novel by Academy Award winner Tom Stoppard (Shakespeare in Love). The story powerfully explores the capacity for love that surges through the human heart.

Set in late-19th-century Russia high-society, the aristocrat Anna Karenina (Knightley) enters into a life-changing affair with the affluent Count Vronsky (Johnson). As Anna questions her happiness and marriage to Alexei Karenin (Law), change comes to all around her.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Joe Wright

Screenwriter: Tom Stoppard, Leo Tolstoy (novel)

Cast: Marine Battier (Mlle. Roland), Max Bennett (Petritsky), Bodil Blain (Princess Sorokina Senior), Nicholas Blatt (Major Domo), Antony Byrne (Colonel Demin), Tannishtha Chatterjee (Masha), Kenneth Collard (Prince Tverskoy), Sam Cox (Kapitonich), Buffy Davis (Agafia), Cara Delevingne (Princess Sorokina), Michelle Dockery (Princess Myagkaya), Steve Evets (Theodore), Emerald Fennell (Princess Merkalova), Aruhan Galieva (Aruhan), Freya Galpin (Masha Oblonsky), Domhnall Gleeson (Levin), Tillie-Bett Grant (Baby Anya), Carl Grose (Korney), Holliday Grainger (Baroness), Paul Ham (Michael), Byran Hands (Mikhail Slyudin), Hera Hilmar (Varya), Thomas Howes (Yashvin), Giles King (Stemov), Keira Knightley (Anna Karenina), Jude Law (Karenin), Henry Lloyd-Jones (Burisov), Susanne Lothar (Princess Scherbatsky), Kelly Macdonald (Dolly), Matthew Macfadyen (Oblonsky), Eric MacLennan (Matey), Jude Monk McGowan (Tuskevitch), Oskar McNamara (Serhoza), Beatrice Morrissey (Vasya Oblonsky), Cecily Morrissey (Lili Oblonsky), Octavia Morrissey (Tanya Oblonsky), Theo Morrissey (Grisha Oblonsky), Luke Newberry (Vasily Lukich), Raphael Personnaz (Alexander Vronsky), Alexandra Roach (Countess Nordston), Guro Nagelhus Schia (Annushka), Bill Skarsgard (Makhotin), Kyle Soller (Korrsunsky), Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Vronsky), Pip Torrens (Prince Shcherbatsky), Alicia Vikander (Kitty), Eros Vlahos (Boris), Emily Watson (Countess Lydia Ivanova), Olivia Williams (Countess Vronsky), David Wilmot (Nikolai), Ruth Wilson (Princess Betsy Tverskoy)

Runtime: 130 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Anna Karenina’ Review: 

Yet another classic masterpiece of literature finds its way onto the big screen with the ambitious project from director Joe Wright (‘Hanna’, ‘The Soloist’) and screenwriter Tom Stoppard (‘Enigma’, TV’S ‘Parade’s End’), a project that has seen them turn Leo Tolstoy’s epic novel ‘Anna Karenina’ into a two-hour film.

For those who have never been forced to read the novel at school the story Based on the classic novel by Leo Tolstoy the film sees Anna Karenina (Keira Knightley – ‘Stars In Shorts’, ‘Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World’) become involved in an intense love triangle with her wealthy husband, Karenin (Jude Law – ‘Side Effects’, ‘Rise Of The Guardians’) and a young soldier, Vronsky (Aaron Taylor-Johnson – ‘Savages’, ‘Albert Nobbs’). While her relationship with Karenin seems steady, Anna must face potential status ruin if she wants to pursue this new exciting love.

Meanwhile Levin (Domhnall Gleeson – ‘Dredd’, ‘Shadow Dancer’) finally plucks up the courage to ask the beautiful Kitty (Alicia Vikander – ‘A Royal Affair’, ‘The Crown Jewels’) to marry him, but because she is also wrapped up in Vronsky she says no, which in turn shatters Levin and has him sadly wasting away.

To his credit Joe Wright doesn’t exactly rest on his laurels and produce yet another period film, no he instead decides to be a little creative and film most of ‘Anna Karenina’ inside a theatre, the end result is a film in the vein of ‘Moulin Rouge!’ that seems to suggest that this is a very public love affair that needs an audience. This inventive style, which includes sets changing in front of the audience’s eyes, does take a little while to get used to but once you feel that you are in line with the flow it actually ends up looking pretty sensational.

Still Wright is let down a little by Stoppard’s work. The original ‘Anna Karenina’ meanders through a lot of characters lives and sadly it seems that Stoppard seems to include too many of these characters in this film version. The main emphasis needs to on Anna/Karenin/Vronsky love triangle, but while the Levin and Kitty romance is entertaining to watch it seems that throughout the film it gets in the way of the main story, especially when those characters are geographically removed from being anywhere near Anna.

The big plus side to ‘Anna Karenina’ is the acting. Keira Knightley puts in one of her best performances in years and she well supported by Aaron Taylor-Johnson who although very removed from the role that made him famous, in ‘Kick-Ass’) puts in a wonderful performance… as does Alicia Vikander who on the back of her performance in ‘A Royal Affair’ indicates that she has a very big future ahead of her.

Sadly these performances are dragged down by Jude Law who surprisingly puts in one of his few poor performances. It seems as though he feels that the character of Karenin should never show emotion on his face, which seems like a poor choice seeing Karenin shows emotion in the film a lot – whether it be sadness or anger.

As far as modern blockbusters go ‘Anna Karenina’ is well worth a look. Wright’s interesting and inventive visual styling certainly brings something to the film, although there are a couple of lulls in the film that have been known to put audience members to sleep.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Anna Karenina′: Check Episode #20 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Anna Karenina’. Dave Griffiths also has another review of ‘Anna Karenina’ available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating:Anna Karenina (2012) on IMDb