Tagged: Nicole Kidman

With New York Comic-Con currently on we are starting to get a look at some of the big films to come out over the next twelve months. Now Warner Bros. has given us an extended look at Aquaman.

The film is directed by Australian director James Wan (Saw, The Conjuring) and stars Jason Momoa (Justice League, Game Of Thrones), Amber Heard (Machete Kills, Drive Angry), Nicole Kidman (Cold Mountain, The Others), Dolph Lundgren (Universal Soldier, The Expendables 2) and Willem Dafoe (Spider-Man, The Florida Project).

 

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Transmission Films invites Australian audiences on a personal journey through Australian cinema with David Stratton, our most revered film critic, when DAVID STRATTON: A CINEMATIC LIFE releases in cinemas this year.
DAVID STRATTON: A CINEMATIC LIFE is an intimate journey with David Stratton, from his first boyhood cinema experience in England, to his migration to Australia as a ‘ten pound pom’ in 1963 and onto his present day reflections on the iconic themes that run through our cinematic legacy.
While David turned his passion for cinema into a profession, a growing band of courageous Australians turned their enthusiasm for storytelling into an extraordinary body of work. Alongside David, this absorbing documentary includes commentary from some of the most recognisable names in Australian cinema including Gillian Armstrong, Eric Bana, Bryan Brown, Russell Crowe, Judy Davis, Nicole Kidman, George Miller, Sam Neill, Geoffrey Rush, Fred Schepisi, Warwick Thornton, Jacki Weaver and Hugo Weaving.
“David Stratton is a true champion of Australian cinema. The opportunity to share his unique personal story on the big screen is a privilege,” said Transmission Films Joint Managing Director Andrew Mackie.
DAVID STRATTON: A CINEMATIC LIFE is written and directed by Sally Aitken (Getting Frank Gehry, Streets of Your Town) and produced by Jo-anne McGowan and executive produced by Jennifer Peedom (Sherpa).
DAVID STRATTON: A CINEMATIC LIFE will open in cinemas nationally on March 9th. David Stratton will be in attendance at select Q&A screenings across the country from late February, with more details coming soon.

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Spectre,’ ‘The Crow’s Egg,’ ‘5 To 7,’ 99 Homes,’ ‘Secret In Their Eyes,’ ‘Now Add Honey’ and ‘The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2’. This episode also contains interviews with Daniel Craig, Monica Bellucci, Lea Seydoux, Andrew Garfield, Nicole Kidman, Julia Roberts, Josh Hutcherson, Jennifer Lawrence, Liam Hemsworth Dave Jackson (Cat Sick Blues), Dee Wallace (Monster Fest), Ivan Malekin (Made In Melbourne Film Festival), Cameron Cairnes (Scare Campaign), Colin Cairnes (Scare Campaign), Ursula Dabrowsky (Inner Demon), Joe Bauer (Australiens) and Rita Artmann (Australiens).

Also  take a listen as the boys launch a brand new giveaway thanks to Ursula Dabrowsky. Take a listen to our interview with Ursula to see how you could win a signed copy of her new film Inner Demon.

To listen to the show or can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Django Unchained

Well the sun has set on another year in cinema land. Films came, films went. Some exceeded expectations, others went away quickly never to be watched again. But if you are looking for the cream of the crop in 2013, then these are this writer’s favorite ten films.

“Django Unchained” – This is a borderline film for most people’s Top Ten lists this year. In some countries it opened in 2012, in other countries it opened in January 2013, so let’s call it a 2013 film. “Django Unchained” was director/screenwriter Quentin Tarantino at his absolute best. The script sizzled with great one liners and brilliant characterization and while the film did lapse a little (incidentally at about the time that Tarantino himself appeared on the screen), the film did more than enough to be one of this year’s best films. As if the script wasn’t enough to win you over, you then have some marvellous performances by Leonardo DiCaprio and Samuel L. Jackson that make this film a must see.

“The Way Way Back” – Every now and then a coming-of-age film comes along that reminds you just how good this genre can be when it is done the right way. Directors Nat Faxon and Jim Rash certainly go the formula right when they put together “The Way Way Back.” The film saw Steve Carell play one of the best against-type roles of all time as he played the emotional abusive father of Duncan (Liam James) while Sam Rockwell put in one of the finest performances of his career as he played the fun-loving owner of a water theme park. If you didn’t get to see “The Way Way Back” when it hit cinemas make sure you check it out when it reaches shelves on DVD.

“Mud” – There was a time when actor Matthew McConaughey was considered a joke. He acted in poorly written romantic comedies that used him more for his looks rather than acting ability. As a result people started to believe that McConaughey was a poor actor, but he turned that around with some great performances in “Bernie” and “Magic Mike.” 2013 saw McConaughey deliver another powerful performance in “Mud,” a small-time drama in which he plays an escaped convict using an island as a hideaway who uses two local boys Ellis (Tye Sheridan) and Neckbone (Jacob Lofland) to help him escape. Director, Jeff Nichols, manages to make this drama an intense thriller by drawing the audience in and making them wonder exactly what Mud is hiding or willing to do in his escape.

“Rust And Bone” – When people talk about some of the acting performances of 2013, it is surprising how many people seem to skip right over Marion Cotillard’s performance in French film “Rust And Bone.” In what is at times a harrowing film Cotillard plays Stephanie, a young woman who loses her legs in an accident involving a killer whale at the marine park at which she works. In an extraordinary piece of screenwriting, Stephanie’s life is completely turned upside down when she meets Alain (Matthias Schoenaerts), an out-of-luck guy who loves to get involved in backyard fights. “Rust And Bone” may have been a gritty drama, but it is also one of the most intense romances to have surfaced in 2013, making it one of the most underrated films of the year.

“Prisoners” – One of the biggest surprises of this year has been the fact that when all the talk of Oscar nominations has been circulating, the film “Prisoners” hasn’t been getting more love. To be blunt “Prisoners” is one of the best crime thrillers to have surfaced since “Silence Of The Lambs.” Director, Denis Villeneuve makes this an intense thriller that sees Australian Hugh Jackman play Keller Dover a father who is pushed to the absolute extreme when his daughter goes missing along with her friend. Out-acting Jackman, just, is Jake Gyllenhaal who plays one of the most intriguing script cops of all time in Detective Loki. This is one crime thriller that will keep you guessing until the very end.

“Flight” – With “Flight,” cinema goers walked into the cinema expecting to see another disaster film. Denzel Washington would play a pilot who had to save a plane load of people as something went wrong … it would be a simple film right? Director, Robert Zameckis surprised everyone by delivering a film that opened with pilot, Whip Whitaker (Washington) snorting cocaine and drinking before boarding a flight. The film then became a well-written thriller after the plane crashes and the investigation tries to work out whether Whip is a hero or a villain. Sensational writing and a great performance by Washington makes for one hell of a film.

“The Paperboy” – One of the other big surprises of 2013 was the film “The Paperboy.” Zac Efron doesn’t normally spell one of the films of the year but this time the young actor really delivered. Efron plays Jack Jansen, a young boy that works at his father’s local newspaper who teams up with his older brother Ward (Matthew McConaughey) who is a journalist working on a racial murder case. Director, Lee Daniels, gets the absolute best out of his cast. Efron and McConaughey are sensational and are well supported by Nicole Kidman and John Cusack, who both act against type remarkably well.

“Broken” – Just when it looked like it was going to be a lean year for British films along came “Broken.” Directed by Rufus Norris “Broken” was a nasty little film that showed British society at its absolute worst. Told through the eyes of a young girl named Skunk (Eloise Laurence), “Broken” tells the story of the violent events that occur at the end of what should be quite English street. From a man who accused of being a sexual monster, to a broken marriage that is affecting some young children and a father who simply cannot cope any more, this is a film where the audience is left wondering who (if anyone) is going to be left emotionally okay (or even alive) by the final credits. “Broken” is British drama at its best.

“What Maisie Knew” – Another surprisingly good film for 2013. On the surface “What Maisie Knew” looked like it would be a film that should be on the Hallmark channel. Instead it became a gritty drama told through the eyes of a young girl named Maisie (Onata Aprile). This young girl becomes the victim of a bitter custody battle between her washed up rock star mother, Susanna (Julianne Moore), and her proud art-dealing Dad, Beale (Steve Coogan). The film had the power to emotionally affect anybody watching it as it soon becomes painfully plain that neither parents want the girl; they just don’t want their ex-partner to have her. “What Maisie Knew” delivers one of the most emotional scripts of the year.

“The Railway Man” – Rounding out the top ten is a late contender with the Australian/British co-production “The Railway Man.” Over the years a lot of filmmakers have told the story of how men cope when they return from war. Few, however, have focused on a story where a victim returns and faces the man who tortured them. Based on a hit novel, “The Railway Man” centers around Eric Lomax (Colin Firth), a man whose war demons come to the surface after he has married Patricia Wallace (Nicole Kidman). As the ghosts who have haunted him since he was a POW forced to work on the Thai Burma Railway come to the fore, Patricia inspires him to return to the scene of the crime, unaware that it will result in a tense standoff with Nagase (Hiroyuki Sanada). The scenes of the two men confronting each other made for some of the best cinematic moments of 2013.

It would be neglectful not to also mention the following films when talking about the best films of 2013. Also worth a look is “Thanks For Sharing” (with a surprisingly good performance by Pink), “Lygon Street: Si Parla Italiano,” “West Memphis Three,” “Trance,” “A Place Beyond The Pines,” “Performance (A Late Quartet),” “Silver Linings Playbook,” “Compliance,” “The Impossible,” “Warm Bodies” and “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints.”

Now that 2013 is out of the way, it is time to wait and see what new gems film lovers can uncover in 2014. Bring it on!

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

The boys from ‘The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show’ take a look at the best films performances when an actor has gone against type.

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Jim Carrey Eternal

  • Morgan Freeman – ‘Now You See Me’
  • Morgan Freeman – ‘Nurse Betty’
  • Jennifer Aniston – ‘Horrible Bosses
  • Jennifer Aniston – ‘We’re The Millers
  • Leonardo DiCaprio – ‘Django Unchained
  • Don Johnson – ‘Django Unchained
  • Vanessa Hudgens – ‘Spring Breakers’
  • Charlize Theron – ‘Monster’
  • Kisten Dunst – ‘Melancholia’
  • Cameron Diaz – ‘Being John Malkovich
  • John Wayne – ‘The Conqueror’
  • Robin Williams – ‘One Hour Photo’
  • Robert De Niro – ‘Meet The Parents’
  • Christopher Walken – ‘Hairspray’
  • Tom Cruise – ‘Collateral’
  • James Stewart – ‘Vertigo’
  • Michael Keaton – ‘Desperate Measures’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘Kick-Ass 2’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘The Truman Show’
  • Vince Vaughn – ‘Domestic Disturbance’
  • Adam Sandler – ‘Punch Drunk Love’

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Tom Crusie Interview With

  • Ben Kingsley – ‘Sexy Beast’
  • Edward Norton – ‘American History X’
  • Jack Nicholson – ‘About Schmidt’
  • Sean Penn – ‘Milk’
  • Michael Douglas – ‘Behind The Candelabra’
  • Charlize Theron – ‘Monster’
  • Harrison Ford – ‘What Lies Beneath’
  • Tom Cruise – ‘Tropic Thunder’
  • Tom Cruise – ‘Interview With The Vampire’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘The Truman Show’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘Kick-Ass 2’
  • Robin Williams – ‘One Hour Photo’
  • Robin Williams – ‘Insomnia’
  • John Travolta – ‘Pulp Fiction’
  • Russell Crowe – ‘A Beautiful Mind’
  • Pierce Brosnan – ‘The Matador’
  • Halle Berry – ‘Cloud Atlas’
  • Hugh Grant – ‘Cloud Atlas’
  • Tom Hanks – ‘Cloud Atlas’
  • Hugo Weaving – ‘Cloud Atlas’
  • Nicole Kidman – ‘To Die For’

GREG KING’S LIST

Henry Fonda

  • Morgan Freeman – ‘Hard Rain
  • Vince Vaughm – ‘Psycho’
  • Gary Oldman – ‘Prick Up Your Ears’
  • Gregory Peck – ‘The Big Country’
  • Gregory Peck – ‘The Boys From Brazil’
  • Gregory Peck – ‘The Omen’
  • Steve Carell – ‘The Way Way Back’
  • Ashton Kutcher – ‘Jobs’
  • David Koencher – ‘Cheap Thrills’
  • John Travolta – ‘The Punisher’
  • John Travolta – ‘Broken Arrow’
  • Nicole Kidman – ‘The Paperboy’
  • Nicole Kidman – ‘Stoker’
  • Michael Keaton – ‘Batman’
  • Henry Fonda – ‘Once Upon A Time In The West’
  • Frank McMurray – ‘Double Indemnity’
  • Frank McMurray – ‘The Apartment’
  • Elijah Wood – ‘Maniac’
  • Elijah Wood – ‘Sin City’
  • Jack Palance – ‘City Slickers’
  • Michael Cera – ‘Youth In Revolt’
  • Brad Pitt – ‘Inglorious Basterds’
  • Ernest Borgnine – ‘Marty’
  • Albert Brooks – ‘Drive’
  • Matthew McConaughey – ‘Killer Joe’

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Leonardo DiCaprio Django Unchained

  • Steve Carell – ‘The Way Way Back’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘Man On The Moon’
  • Henry Fonda – ‘Once Upon A Time In The West’
  • Robin Williams – ‘Insomnia’
  • Robin Williams – ‘One Hour Photo’
  • Bill Murray – ‘Get Low’
  • John Stamos – ‘Captive’
  • Leonardo DiCaprio – ‘Django Unchained’
  • Ewan McGregor – ‘Moulin Rouge!’
  • Russell Crowe – ‘Les Miserables’
  • Michael Cera – ‘This Is The End’
  • Ben Affleck – ‘Jay + Silent Bob Strike Back’
  • Matt Damon – ‘Jay + Silent Bob Strike Back’
  • Melissa Gilbert – ‘Ice House’
  • Matthew McConaughey – ‘Mud’
  • Matthew McConaughey – ‘Magic Mike’
  • Matthew McConaughey – ‘Bernie’
  • Tom Cruise – ‘Rock Of Ages’
  • Tom Cruise – ‘Tropic Thunder’
  • Seth Rogen – ‘Take This Waltz’
  • Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight
  • Liam Neeson – ‘Batman Begins’
  • Robert De Niro ‘Stardust’

Stoker

Summary: When India loses her father in a car accident on her 18th birthday, her mother Evie invites India’s long-lost Uncle Charlie to stay with them. Charlie is a mysterious, charming and possibly dangerous figure, and as India’s suspicion of him grows, she finds herself drawn towards him..

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 29th August, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK

Director: Chan-wook Park

Screenwriter: Wentworth Miller

Cast: Thomas A. Covert (Young Charles Stoker), Alden Ehrenreich (Whip), Judith Godreche (Doctor Jacquin), Matthew Goode (Charles Stoker), Jaxon Johnson (Jonathan Stoker), Paxton Johnson (Jonathan Stoker), Nicole Kidman (Evelyn Stoker), Harmony Korine (Mr. Feldman), Dermot Mulroney (Richard Stoker), Phyllis Somerville (Mrs. McGarrick), Lucas Till (Pitts),  Tyler von Tagen (Young Richard Stoker), Mia Wasikowska (India Stoker), Jacki Weaver (Gwendolyn Stoker)

Runtime: 99 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘STOKER’:

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s review of You’re Next’ that is available on www.filmreviews.com.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(3.5)

Please check Adam’s review of ‘You’re Nexdt’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 47

Adam Ross: Stars(4)

Please check Adam’s review of ‘You’re Nexdt’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 47

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:  Stoker (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Stoker′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 47 for our in-depth review of ‘Stoker.’

Trailer:

The Paperboy

Summary: Jack Jansen (Zach Efron) welcomes his brother Ward (Matthew McConaughey) home after a long absence. Accompanied by his British writing partner Yardley (David Oyelowo), Ward is intrigued by the plight of Charlotte Bless (Nicole Kidman in her wild Golden Globe nominated role) and a prisoner she swears is innocent: Hilary Van Wetter (John Cusack). Hoping to uncover a miscarriage of justice, Ward and Yardley become tangled in the sweaty, sun-drenched web spun by their subjects while Jack finds himself increasingly obsessed with the flirtatious Charlotte.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Lee Daniels

Screenwriter: Lee Daniels, Peter Dexter

Cast: Camille Balsamo (Pam), Ned Bellamy (Tyree Van Wetter), Ava Bogle (Renee), Johnny Carson (himself), Gary Clarke (Weldon Pine), John Cusack (Hillary Van Wetter), Zac Efron (Jack Jansen), John P. Fertitta (Sam Ellison), Scott Glenn (W.W. Jansen), Nealla Gordon (Ellen Guthrie), Macy Gray (Anita Chester), Danny Hanemann (Sheriff Thurmond Call), Leslie Hippensteel (Kim), Nicole Kidman (Charlotte Bless), Corrina Lyons (Cousin Alice), Matthew McConaughey (Ward Jansen), Nikolette Noel (Nancy), Jay Oliver (Mr. Guthrie), David Oyelowo (Yardley Acheman), Adam Sibley (Eugene), Robyn Sprehe (Miss Betty), Katarzyna Wolejinio (Jennifer)

Runtime: 108 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Paperboy’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘The Paperboy’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Paperboy′: Check Episode #22 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘The Paperboy’.

Rating: 4.5/5

IMDB Rating:The Paperboy (2012) on IMDb

The Sapphires

The winners of the 2nd annual Australian Academy of Cinema and Televsion Arts Awards were last night announced at a star studded ceremony in Sydney last night. The night was hosted by Russell Crowe and the Awards were announced by the likes of Cate Blanchett, Geoffrey Rush, Nicole Kidman, Stephen Curry and Ricky Ponting.

Here is the full list of winners.

FILM

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
• Iron Sky. Samuli Torssonen, Jussi Lehtiniemi, Juuso Kaari, Kelly Myers.

AACTA RAYMOND LONGFORD AWARD
• Al Clark

TELEVISION
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CHILDREN’S TELEVISION SERIES
• The Adventures of Figaro Pho. Dan Fill, Frank Verheggen, David Webster. ABC3

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION COMEDY SERIES
• Lowdown – Season 2. Nicole Minchin, Amanda Brotchie, Adam Zwar. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION SERIES
• Agony Aunts. Adam Zwar, Nicole Minchin. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE IN A TELEVISION COMEDY
• Patrick Brammall. A Moody Christmas. ABC1

SHORT FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT ANIMATION
• The Hunter. Marieka Walsh.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT FICTION FILM
• Julian. Robert Jago, Matthew Moore.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN A SHORT FILM
• Transmission. Zak Hilditch.

DOCUMENTARY

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FEATURE LENGTH DOCUMENTARY
• Storm Surfers 3D. Ellenor Cox, Marcus Gillezeau.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY UNDER ONE HOUR
• Then The Wind Changed. Jeni McMahon, Celeste Geer. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY SERIES
• Go Back To Where You Came From. Rick McPhee, Ivan O’Mahoney. SBS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Fighting Fear. Macario De Souza. FOXTEL – Movie Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Fighting Fear. Tim Bonython, Chris Bryan, Macario De Souza, Lee Kelly. FOXTEL – Movie Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Once Upon A Time In Cabramatta – Episode 1. Sam Wilson. SBS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Dr Sarmast’s Music School. Dale Cornelius, Livia Ruzic, Keith Thomas. ABC1

FEATURE FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
• The Sapphires. Warwick Thornton.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING
• The Sapphires. Dany Cooper ASE.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND
• The Sapphires. Andrew Plain, Bry Jones, Pete Smith, Ben Osmo, John Simpson.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE
• Not Suitable For Children. Matteo Zingales, Jono Ma.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
• The Sapphires. Melinda Doring.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN
• The Sapphires. Tess Schofield.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST YOUNG ACTOR
• Saskia Rosendahl. Lore.

NEWS.COM.AU AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD FOR MOST MEMORABLE SCREEN MOMENT
• The Sapphires.

BYRON KENNEDY AWARD
• Sarah Watt

TELEVISION
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST REALITY TELEVISION SERIES
• The Amazing Race Australia. Michael McKay, Trent Chapman, David Gardner, Matthew Kowald. Seven Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES
• Puberty Blues. John Edwards, Imogen Banks. Network Ten

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEFEATURE OR MINI SERIES
• Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War. John Edwards, Mimi Butler. Nine Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN TELEVISION
• Jack Irish: Bad Debts. Jeffrey Walker. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN TELEVISION
• Redfern Now – Episode 6 ‘Pretty Boy Blue’. Steven McGregor. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Richard Roxburgh. Rake – Season 2. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Leah Purcell. Redfern Now – Episode 1 ‘Family’. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Aaron Jeffery. Underbelly Badness – Episode 3 ‘The Loaded Dog’. Nine Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Mandy McElhinney. Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War – Part 2. Nine Network

FEATURE FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FILM
• The Sapphires. Rosemary Blight, Kylie du Fresne.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
• The Sapphires. Wayne Blair.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
• Wish You Were Here. Kieran Darcy-Smith, Felicity Price.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
• The Sapphires. Keith Thompson, Tony Briggs.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR
• Chris O’Dowd. The Sapphires.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS
• Deborah Mailman. The Sapphires.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
• Antony Starr. Wish You Were Here.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
• Jessica Mauboy. The Sapphires.
2nd AACTA Awards_Winners and Nominees_Luncheon, Ceremony & International Page 10 of 10

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY
• Django Unchained. Quentin Tarantino.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
• Silver Linings Playbook. David O. Russell.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST ACTOR
• Daniel Day-Lewis Lincoln.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST ACTRESS
• Jennifer Lawrence. Silver Linings Playbook.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST FILM
• Silver Linings Playbook. Donna Gigliotti, Bruce Cohen, Jonathan Gordon.

Argo

And the nominees are:

Best Motion Picture, Drama

Argo
Django Unchained
Life of Pi
Lincoln
Zero Dark Thirty

Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
Les Misérables
Moonrise Kingdom
Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Silver Linings Playbook

Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama

Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln
Richard Gere, Arbitrage
John Hawkes, The Sessions
Joaquin Phoenix, The Master
Denzel Washington, Flight

Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

Jack Black, Bernie
Bradley Cooper, Silver Linings Playbook
Hugh Jackman, Les Misérables
Ewan McGregor, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Bill Murray, Hyde Park on the Hudson

Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama

Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard, Rust and Bone
Helen Mirren, Hitchcock
Naomi Watts, The Impossible
Rachel Weisz, The Deep Blue Sea

Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

Emily Blunt, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Judi Dench, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook
Maggie Smith, Quartet
Meryl Streep, Hope Springs

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture

Alan Arkin, Argo
Leonardo DiCaprio, Django Unchained
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master
Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln
Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained

Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

Amy Adams, The Master
Sally Field, Lincoln
Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables
Helen Hunt, The Sessions
Nicole Kidman, The Paperboy

Best Director

Ben Affleck, Argo
Kathryn Bigelow, Zero Dark Thirty
Ang Lee, Life of Pi
Steven Spielberg, Lincoln
Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture

Mark Boal, Zero Dark Thirty
Tony Kushner, Lincoln
David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook
Quentin Taratino, Django Unchained
Chris Terrio, Argo

Best Foreign-Language Film

Amour (Austria)
A Royal Affair (Denmark)
The Intouchables (France
Kon-Tiki (Norway)
Rust and Bone  (France)

Best Animated Feature Film

Brave
Frankenweenie
Hotel Transylvania
Rise of the Guardians
Wreck-It Ralph

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

“For You,” Act of Valor, Monty Powell & Keith Urban
“Not Running Anymore,” Stand Up Guys, Jon Bon Jovi
“Safe and Sound,” The Hunger Games, Taylor Swift. John Paul White, Joy Williams & T Bone Burnett
“Skyfall,” Skyfall, Adele & Paul Epworth
“Suddenly,” Les Misérables, Claude-Michel Schonberg & Alain Boublil

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

Mychael Danna, Life of Pi
Alexandre Desplat, Argo
Dario Marianelli, Anna Karenina
Tom Tykwer, Johnny Klimek, Reinhold Heil, Cloud Atlas
John Williams, Lincoln

Best TV Movie or Miniseries

Game Change
The Girl
Hatfields & McCoys
The Hour
Political Animals

Best TV Series, Drama

Boardwalk Empire
Breaking Bad
Downton Abbey
Homeland
The Newsroom

Best TV Series, Comedy

The Big Bang Theory
Episodes
Girls
Modern Family
Smash

Best Actor in a TV Series, Drama

Steve Buscemi, Boardwalk Empire
Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad
Jeff Daniels, The Newsroom
Jon Hamm, Mad Men
Damian Lewis, Homeland

Best Actor, TV Series Comedy

Alec Baldwin, 30 Rock
Don Cheadle, House of Lies
Louis C.K., Louie
Matt LeBlanc, Episodes
Jim Parsons, The Big Bang Theory

Best Actress in a TV Series, Drama

Connie Britton, Nashville
Glenn Close, Damages
Claire Danes, Homeland
Michelle Dockery, Downton Abbey
Julianna Marguiles, The Good Wife

Best Actress in a TV Series, Comedy

Zooey Deschanel, New Girl
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep
Lena Dunham, Girls
Tina Fey, 30 Rock
Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation

Best Actor in a Miniseries or TV Movie

Kevin Costner, Hatfields & McCoys
Benedict Cumberbatch, Sherlock
Woody Harrelson, Game Change
Toby Jones, The Girl
Clive Owen, Hemingway & Gellhorn

Best Actress in a Miniseries or TV Movie

Julianne Moore, Game Change
Nicole Kidman, Hemingway & Gellhorn
Jessica Lange, American Horror Story: Asylum
Sienna Miller, The Girl
Sigourney Weaver, Political Animals

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Mini-Series or TV Movie

Max Greenfield, New Girl
Ed Harris, Game Change
Danny Huston, Magic City
Mandy Patinkin, Homeland
Eric Stonestreet, Modern Family

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Miniseries, or TV Movie

Hayden Panettiere, Nashville
Archie Panjabi, The Good Wife
Sarah Paulson, Game Change
Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey
Sofia Vergara, Modern Family

Cecile B. DeMille Award

Jodie Foster