Tagged: Patrick Stewart

Logan2

Over the past twenty years comic book fans have had the immense pleasure of being able to watch nine films set in the X-Men universe (if you include the stand-alone Wolverine and Deadpool movies). For a generation of film goers now Australian actor Hugh Jackman is Wolverine while acclaimed actor Patrick Stewart has shared the role of Professor Charles Xavier with James McAvoy, who has played the younger version of the fearless leader in the newer films.

Now as the curtain falls on this world of mutants and heroes for Jackman and Stewart they team up with director James Mangold (who dipped into the franchise in 2013 with The Wolverine). The film has a much darker tone and this time is more graphic than its predecessors… something that has earned it an R-Rating from the classification board.

That ‘different’ tone is something that the man himself Hugh Jackman is only too happy to talk about. “I think the whole film feels different,” he says shifting his chair. ‘Tone, character wise it’s different to any of the others. And that was our goal, I didn’t want it to feel like the final chapter of a saga I wanted it to feel like a whole new, fresh thing. I wanted to stake some new ground. Logan in this film is more human… hence the title… he’s sick, his powers are dwindlering, he’s vulnerable, he’s also looking after an aging father-figure in Charles Xavier and hiding him out. He’s also under stress, he doesn’t have money – he’s a limo driver trying to earn enough bucks to get by and to buy the meds that Charles needs and he’s got a lot of very mundane, everyday stuff going on. But clearly he has checked out, he is at the bottom and so want James Mangold and James Frank did was kind of create a world for a character whose biggest fear is love and intimacy, because that only brings pain, but now he is surrounded by a family that is forced upon him.”

The new story brings about a whole new relationship between Logan (Wolverine) and Charles Xavier with Jackman explains precisely. “Charles has dementia,” he explains. “Charles Xavier has been a father figure and mentor and probably understands him the best because Logan is a closed book. He quips and he is tough and all that but Charles knows where he comes from and knows his background – he knows the demons that he is fighting. So he knows him and but in this one the tables are turned a little bit because he has dementia, so he is confused and he is vulnerable and he’s angry and he is many, many, many different things. At times he is child-like and then at other times he is abusive and Logan is just in that carer role, that role of taking care day and night day in and day out, he also has to keep him hidden from authorities so it is a great dynamic and it was a lot of fun to play. And it was even better because it was with a great friend and one of the greatest actors I have ever met.

But then a quick look at the poster and of course trailer and fans of the series will notice that there is another potential relationship for Logan in this film as well. “Yes, then there is a young girl that has been created from DNA,” Jackman says almost teasingly. “And that DNA may very well resemble my own, and that was stolen so it wasn’t like he chose to have a daughter, which she may be, but he is confronted with genetics that are very similar to his own and a task to rescue/protect/save her. He doesn’t want that task and he pushes it away for as long as he can but that relationship between those two characters, that father/daughter relationship, is very strong, and this young girl Daphne that plays that part is absolutely astonishing.”

So what does Jackman hope that fans will take away from this film? “My hope for fans with this film and I talk to them every day, maybe every second day, over the last seventeen years is that they say that this is ‘the Wolverine movie that they have always wanted to see,” he says smiling. “That is my hope and dream and that was my guiding star while making this movie.”

The other actor also farewelling the series here is Patrick Stewart and he says audiences will also see a very different side to his character, Charles Xavier. “Not only will you see a different side to Charles you will see a transformed Charles,” he explains. “The controlled, intelligent, sensitive intellectual has been replaced with a scatter-brained, crazy, physically-fragile and highly dangerous individual. No one could ever imagine that Charles Xavier could become a dangerous being in society, it’s unthinkable, but here he is putting the world at risk.”

He to explains how this changes his relationship with Logan. “From the very beginning Charles has had a very caring relationship with him. He knew everything about Logan – his past, how he came about, what had been done to him, the misery and agony of that. He always felt a protectiveness towards him. Logan has always been a difficult personality – independent, sometimes aggressive, sometimes mean-spirited, hostile even, but essentially he has always had his heart in the right place. Now there has been a turnaround and the carer is Logan and the vulnerable, weak, fragile one is Charles. And as I said not only vulnerable but also very dangerous.”

“Our primary duty is to entertain,” says Stewart talking about his hopes for the film with fans. “But entertaining can have very different aspects to it. There are themes within this film which some people have already identified as being a contemporary commentary on present day society, particularly in Europe and the United States. I don’t think that was the overt intention of the producers and the writers of this movie but I think that has unfortunately come about that way. But yes there is some instruction in this movie. There are warning contained within this movie and if they are listened to in any way whatsoever then not only have we entertained then perhaps we have also been a benefit.”

Of course fans have also been very excited to see director James Mangold return to the franchise so what was it like for Stewart to work with him and the rest of the cast. “I had only ever done one days work with James previously,” explains Stewart. “Ian McKellan and I shot a one day short movie scenes as a fill-in for the first Wolverine movie, but I met with James very early on in the process and I enjoyed that two/three hour conversation that we had about the screenplay and about the character of Charles and particularly about his disintegration. I love working with James, he is a craftsman and he knows filmmaking so well. He knows on the one hand exactly what he wants, but I have never before worked with a director that is so open to other possibilities and to input from his cast, even bringing up the unexpected and at times even inviting us to improvise which is something that always appeals to me and some of those little improvisations even made it into the movie. With the cast – well the X-Men are reduced down to two in this film and to have such a close relationship with Logan being Hugh Jackman has been a delight as it always has been for seventeen years.”

So it seems that both cast and fans alike are sad to see Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart leaving the franchise, but at least they all have one last film to savour before the curtain-call.

Logan is out in cinemas right now.

Summary: In a future where mutants are nearly extinct, an elderly and weary Logan leads a quiet life. But when Laura, a mutant child pursued by scientists, comes to him for help, he must get her to safety.

Year: 2017

Australian Cinema Release Date: 3rd March 2017

Australian DVD Release Date: 7th June 2017

Country: United States

Director: James Mangold

Screenwriter: Scott Frank, Michael Green, James Mangold, John Ramita Sr. (characters), Ray Thomas (characters), Herb Trimpe (characters), Len Wein (characters), Steven McNiven (novel), Mark Millar (novel)

Cast: Daniel Bernhardt (Bone Breaker), Ashlyn Casalegno (Charlotte), Salif Celiz (Jonah), Stephen Dunlevy (Macon), Alison Fernandez (Delilah), Quincy Fouse (Nate Munson), Rey Gallegos (Rey), Jason Genao (Rictor), Richard E. Grant (Dr. Rice), Boyd Holbrook (Pierce), Hugh Jackman (Logan/X-24), David Kallaway (Rhodes), Dafne Keen (Laura), Eriq La Selle (Will Munson), Lennie Loftin (Jackson), Parker Lovein (Lizard Boy), Stephen Merchant (Caliban), Doris Morgado (Maria), Elise Neal (Kathryn Munson), Elizabeth Rodriguez (Gabriela), Krystof Soszynski (Mohawk), Patrick Stewart (Charles), Ryan Sturz (Pretty Boy), Bryant Tardy (Bobby), Hannah Westerfield (Rebecca)

Running Time: 137 mins

Classification: R

 

OUR LOGAN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths’s Logan Review:

Sometimes the worst thing a film lover can do is believe the hype surrounding a film before it arrives in cinemas. In the months leading up to Logan we had heard that it was stand-alone Wolverine film different to any other X-Men movie, it would be R-Rated and aimed for adults and then just to make sure that our excitement levels were at their peak the rumours started coming out of the States was that Logan was going to be the best comic book movie since The Dark Knight. Then of course came the trailer which made the film appear like it was going to have amazing similarities to The Wrestler. All of the things that I was expecting from the pre-hype went out the window just twenty minutes into the film though.

Set in the not too distant future the film finds Logan (Hugh Jackman – Eddie The Eagle) hiding just over the Mexican border. All of the other mutants are now gone – dead – and Logan is left hiding out with Caliban (Stephen MerchantThe Office) while he looks after an ailing Professor Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart – Star Trek: Next Generation) who is suffering from dementia. Logan is a mess himself – unshaven, alcoholic and making ends meet by doing a mundane job as a chauffer.

Logan’s life is turned around though when a distraught woman, Gabriela (Elizabeth RodriguezOrange Is The New Black), turns to him saying that a young girl, Laura (Dafne Keen – The Refugees), needs his help. He refuses to but that all that changes when Pierce (Boyd Holbrook – Gone Girl) shows up trying to hunt down Laura.

The premise was there to set up an almost post-apocalyptic Wolverine film, and if the film had kept to the tone of the trailer it would have done just that, but instead director James Mangold (The Wolverine) falls into the same traps that a lot of the early X-Men movies did. In fact perhaps the most frustrating part of Logan is the screenplay. At times the film threatens to become something brilliant but then it is let down by some really lazy writing. Like so often in the Marvel universe the ‘bad guys’ are walking clichés, so much so that Boyd Holbrook is wasted playing a character that pretty much has zero characterisation. Then there are simple frustrating things like those same one-dimensional baddies pulling out ‘secret weapons’ that are never referenced to earlier. They also seem dumb enough to keep trying the same tricks to bring down Logan, normally running at him and firing wildly, despite the fact he has already created a body count mowing down the last twenty or so guys that have tried the same tactic. Then there are things such as Logan and Xavier stupidly putting innocent people in danger when they should be able to predict what is going to happen and mutants seemingly forgetting their special abilities and choosing to run from those who are pursuing them. Perhaps the biggest shock though is the screenplay treating one of the franchise’s most loved characters in a really disrespectful way that is sure to infuriate those who have grown up with the franchise.

It really does feel weird that Mangold didn’t have a better handle on the subjects at hand. The director of a film like Girl, Interrupted should have had a better grasp on how to handle Xavier’s mental decay while films like Walk The Line and 3:10 To Yuma should have a better handle on dramatic storylines that serve their characters better. Mangold is normally a good director but here he seems to too easily fall into some of the traps that Bryan Singer fell into early on in the franchise.

The shame here is that Mangold wastes the skills of two men that turned up on their set with their A-Game ready to go. Patrick Stewart delivers one of the performances of his career as he plays Charles as a man that is not only struggling with his memory but also struggling with ghosts of the past. Likewise Jackman decides to go out with a bang.  His performance as the aged and disgruntled Logan is one of his performances in the franchise and as usual his action scenes are sublime.

Logan is one of those films that any fan of the franchise has to watch. The film is a finale to two of the actors that have made this series so special and while it is arguable that the story doesn’t do their characters justice Jackman and Stewart do both step up to plate and deliver memorable performances. It’s not very often that I like to see actors go back on their word and return to a role after a finale I would find it pretty easy to forgive these two men if a better script came along for their characters.

 

 

 

Harley Woods’s Logan Review:

Purportedly the final outing of Hugh Jackman as Wolverine in this latest X-Men-related movie, Logan delivers a brutal, action-intense, highly emotional conclusion to the hugely famous hero.

The unrestrained action starts right at the beginning, setting up the nature of the feral hero we’ve all come to love. Immediately, we see a darker world at a point in the future where mutants (the next stage of human evolution) have died out and Logan is scraping by on a meager existence, all so he can save for a boat and medicine for his aged and dying friend – and former mentor – Professor Charles Xavier.

We are introduced to a hopeless world where everyone Logan has known and loved have died and he’s passing time taking care of his last surviving tie to the world before he can finally die himself; his mutant healing-factor finally losing the fight to keep his body functioning while suffering heavy-metal-poisoning due to the Adamantium bonded to his skeleton and claws many decades ago.

Hugh Jackman’s performance is gripping, firmly settling into the personality of a sick, disheartened and wold-weary Logan. Having lost everything he’s cared about, the effort to take care of Charles is taking its toll, but it’s also all he has to keep him going.

The medication Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) need to keep his seizures at bay has the side-effect of keeping him in a maddened state. Failure to keep on the medication causes his mutant powers to go into overdrive when he seizures – an event which could potentially hurt and kill anyone in his vicinity.

Patrick Stewart’s performance as an older incarnation of Professor X, struggling with his own sense of self during his failing health, is perfect as the grounding and conscience for Logan. He adds life and heart and hope where Logan only sees hopelessness and is a driving force in convincing Logan to take on a final mission – to take a young mutant girl across the border to a supposed ‘mutant Eden’.

The girl in question is Laura – AKA ‘X-23’ (the last of the purpose-bred mutant children intended to be used as weapons) – whose powers are identical to Logan’s. This turns Logan’s whole view of life and apparent disconnection on its head. Dafne Keen delivers an intense performance as the desperate young Laura who distrust all around her as she fights to survive. Her skills throughout the action sequences and her ability to hold her own alongside the incredible performances of her seasoned co-stars do her great credit. She is someone whose career will definitely be worth watching.

It was great to see a live-action version of Donald Pierce and his cybernetically-enhanced Reavers, even if a little understated. Further threat comes later in the film in the form of “X-24” – the ultimate weapon who is made interesting by the fact he has an almost familial connection to his creator, Doctor Rice (Richard E Grant), whose father was responsible for bonding the Adamantium metal to Logan’s bones many years ago (and was subsequently killed by those claws).

Based loosely on the Marvel Comics’ story “Old Man Logan”, this cinematic interpretation pares back a lot of the cameo- and continuity-laden comic and injects more X-men and Wolverine-specific elements while keeping the plot very ‘tight’ and personal for our protagonist. The great strength of this film is that it is so self-contained that it could stand quite well as a movie in its own right without ever referencing Marvel’s X-Men licences, with a quality of story and palpability of its emotional content.

The production team on all levels deserve a huge applaud for their work, succeeding raising the bar from the amazing previous instalment, The Wolverine (2013). Emotionally and physically brutal, this is a piece of drama recommended for serious film lovers; equally appealing to someone looking for a dark drama or an action film.

Having exceeded my expectations, it took a day or two of thought to figure out what didn’t sit right with me. The only criticism I have is that some elements or story elements could have been expanded further, including a little backstory on how some of the characters got to where they are, or taking a glimpse into the past at the fall of the mutants; maybe even seeing a little more of Charles in his ‘demented’ state. But, the

truth is that this would have distracted from the contained story and probably would have ruined the pace of the film. To be honest, I think I just want more of a great thing!

 

 

 

Kyle McGrath’s Logan Review:

Being largely seen as the superhero film franchise which began the current age of comic book movies the X-Men series has seen its ups and downs over the last almost 2 decades. Sequels, Prequels, soft-reboots, spin offs and with the recent success of Deadpool it became clear there was an audience for adult themed comic-book films. Makes sense, anybody born when the series began would be almost old enough to drink now. With the release of Logan after fan disappointment some 3 or 4 years back after learning The Wolverine wouldn’t be receiving an adult rating after rumours to the contrary fans are joyous at the prospect of finally getting the adult Wolverine film they have wanted for a long time.
Logan tells the story of an aging and weary Wolverine (High Jackman) in the not too distant future. The mutants of the world are mostly dead and the x-men are a thing of the past, their former leader and powerful telepath Professor X (Patrick Stewart) suffers from the slow onset of dementia and must be cared for and kept medicated by Logan. Working as a chauffeur he is approached by a woman asking for his help in transporting herself and a young girl across the country. Initially hesitant Logan soon discovers the girl has powers similar to his own and is being pursued by dark forces. He must decide whether to continue on his current path or to protect the girl in a world where there kind seem to have no future.
Logan the film is a very different movie to the other films in the x-men franchise. Much more brooding and down to earth than previous instalments the film’s smaller scale and deeper focus on the title character allows for a fitting send off to the character of Wolverine (or at least this incarnation of it) in what is to be Hugh Jackman’s final performance in his career making role.
The film’s adult rating too allows for a degree of fan service which was lacking in the other portrayals of Wolverine on the big screen up till now. I still recall that while the family friendly film X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009) is looked at as the single lowest point of the franchise, the tie-in video game which had much more bloody chaotic violent action was generally well received as what “might have been”. Logan is much more fitting with that vision of the character.
While the graphic depiction of bloody violence, though different, still ties in well with the other films I believe the liberal use of vulgar dialogue does not. It seems a bit like the writers decided “well it’s an adult film now so everyone should swear, a lot”. It makes sense for Logan to use an F-word now and then but when his use of the word gets more and more frequent it begins to feel a bit off. But when Professor X drops like 3 F-qbombs in the first scene he’s in its very jarring with how his character has always talked previous. It’s the only way I think the mature nature of the film hurts the movie.
The story of Logan and the details leading up to it feel a little underdeveloped. Right off the bat we’re told that most of the world’s mutants are dead or gone which is depressing enough considering canonically-wise the last film was about successfully preventing exactly that from happening. It’s a bit of a downer that a time travelling Wolverine in “X-Men: Days of Future Past” managed to save all mutant kind only for them to be wiped out again anyway.
However to make it worse we’re never given much of an explanation as to how things got this way outside of quite vague handwaves. This may be on purpose as to allow the filmmakers to focus on this point of the “X-Men Saga” more but the cynic in me thinks it also was to allow future films room in the timeline to breathe.
An issue I believe plagues the film is that for how much punch there is to the violence and how much more biting the course language is ironically many of the points in the film that were supposed to have punch to them I felt lacked impact. The main antagonist showing up halfway through the film and then being underdeveloped, the death of beloved characters happening off screen without explanation, even Logan’s story of redemption felt weak  with me because I feel like I’ve seen Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine character go through this arc several times already. There’s only so many times I can see a disenfranchised character find a sense of belonging and family only to be reverted for the sake of doing the same thing in a sequel but no THIS time it’s different for some reason.
Logan is something very different to what we’re used to seeing in comic book movies and in X-Men movies as well. For that alone it deserve credit. It’s sad to see Hugh Jackman retiring from the character, but all good things come to an end and despite the issues I believe the film had this is still a respectable way to say farewell to the portrayal of a character many of us have grown up with.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:  

 

 

IMDB Rating: 
Logan (2017) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Logan Reviews: N/A

 

Trailer:

Journey To Space 3D

Summary: Journey To Space is a brand new IMAX documentary that tells the history of space travel while also taking a look at the machinery and people that will carry on the future of space expedition as humanity plans to walk on Mars.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th March, 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Mark Krenzien

Screenwriter: Mark Krenzien

Cast: Patrick Stewart (narrator)

Runtime: 45 mins

Classification: CTC

 

OUR JOURNEY TO SPACE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

For most of us we fell in love with space by watching some pretty badly put together documentaries that were forced upon us in school science classrooms. Normally they contained dull and boring voiceovers that had the potential to make you lapse into some kind of coma, while the footage was so grainy you basically had to take the narrator’s word for it that you were actually seeing a star system in outer space. Well that is a thing of the past because now comes Journey To Space, one of the best space documentaries that you are ever likely to see.

It probably sounds like a bit of cliché but Journey To Space is a ground-breaking documentary. Seeing a documentary on one of the world’s biggest screens in IMAX is always a brilliant experience but seeing outer space in this format takes the whole documentary experience to a completely different level. As the film shows some spectacularly clear footage captured over the years it really feels like you are laying down on the grass looking up into a night sky that has been magnified a million times over.

Experience documentary director Mark Krenzien has put Journey To Space together in such a way that there simply no part of the docco that will make its audience lose interest. The brief look at the history of space travel is brilliantly put together and manages to capture the highs, such as the first moon landing, and the lows, such as the Challenger disaster, equally well. Even the footage of various space shuttles being retired and taken to their final resting places becomes fascinating as the gives the audience a chance to get really close to these fascinating piece of equipment.

And if that footage isn’t engaging enough the second half of the documentary takes a further step forward as narrator Patrick Stewart steps aside for astronauts to talk about their own personal journeys into space and to talk about what equipment is currently being developed to take humans to Mars over the next decade. This is also the best format to view the currently available footage of Mars because presented here in this docco it really blows you away.

Journey To Space is the kind of documentary that has the power to even floor those people who say that doccos are boring and uninteresting. The only way to see Journey To Space is in 3D and in IMAX because the visuals are designed in such a way to blow you away as they are presented on the biggest screen possible. To be honest I probably learned more about space travel in this docco than I did in any science class, and the visuals completely blew me away. This is a docco that really shows just how powerful IMAX can be… a must see.

 

Stars(5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(5)

 

IMDB Rating: Journey to Space (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Journey To Space reviews: Nil

Trailer:

A Million Ways To Die InThe West 2

Summary: As a cowardly farmer begins to fall for the mysterious new woman in town, he must put his new-found courage to the test when her husband, a notorious gun-slinger, announces his arrival.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 29th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Seth MacFarlane

Screenwriter: Seth MacFarlane, Alec Sulkin, Wellesley Wild

Cast: John Aylward (Pastor Wilson), Preston Bailey (Young Albert), Johnny Bautista (Carl), Alex Borstein (Millie), Amick Byram (Marcus Thornton), Ardy Brent Carlson (Cowboy Ardy), Jean Effron (Elsie Stark), Jamie Foxx (Django), Ralph Garman (Dan), Gilbert Gottfried (Abraham Lincoln), Christopher Hagen (George Stark), Neil Patrick Harris (Foy), Evan Jones (Lewis), Rex Linn (Sheriff/Narrator), Christopher Lloyd (Doc Brown), Seth MacFarlane (Albert), Ewan McGregor (Cowboy At Fair), Aaron McPherson (Ben), Liam Neeson (Clinch), Jay Patterson (Doctor Harper), Ryan Reynolds (Man Killed By Clinch In Bar), Giovanni Ribisi (Edward), Brett Rickaby (Charlie Blanche), Mike A. Salazar (6-Year-Old-Albert), Amanda Seyfried (Louise), Sarah Silverman (Ruth), Patrick Stewart (Dream Voice), Wes Studi (Cochise), Charlize Theron (Anna), Debbie Waters (Mother Of James Addison)

Runtime: 116 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s A Million Ways To Die In The West review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #81

Stars(3)

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s A Million Ways To Die In The West review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

Television fans worldwide had always known that Seth MacFarlane was a comedy genius. His show-pony, the hilarious Family Guy had revealed a dark sense of humor that wasn’t always politically correct but was always worth a laugh or two. Then came Ted, a film that centered around a foul-mouthed, alcoholic, drug abusing bear, a film that also proved that Mr MacFarlane’s comedic talents could also transfer to the big screen.

Now comes MacFarlane’s real test, that difficult second film… very often the film that will make or break a filmmaker. Just to raise the bar even higher MacFarlane has decided the tough task of making a comedy western, a genre that works well in the shape of Blazing Saddles but has also delivered some severe duds along the way. Besides that he has also decided to star, direct, write and produce the whole shebang. The good news for his fans though is he delivers the goods.

MacFarlane (Movie 43, Ted) plays Albert, a kind-hearted sheep farmer who is a bit of a loser when it comes to life. He spends most of his time concerned at the million or so ways that the old west can kill you while also seemingly fail at being a sheep farmer considering his sheep are normally found wondering all around the town he calls home.

To add to his loser status he suddenly finds himself dumped by his girlfriend, Louise (Amanda Seyfried – Epic, The Big Wedding) who decides that she is better suited the much more successful and moustached Foy (Neil Patrick Harris – Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2, The Smurfs 2). Worse still is the fact that Foy has challenged Albert to a gun duel and despite his surroundings he has never fired a gun before in his life.

Enter Anna (Charlize Theron – Prometheus, Snow White And The Huntsman) the attractive gun-slinger who rides into town and takes an interest liking to Albert. She is more than happy to train him for the gun fight and along the way they learn that they also share the same interests… and sense of the humor. The one thing that she fails to tell him though is that she is married to, Clinch (Liam Neeson – The Lego Movie, Non-Stop), a tough, violent outlaw who is not impressed when he finds about Anna and Albert.

While A Million Ways To Die In The West does ultimately work it is on occasions hit and miss… although the hits do outweigh the misses. The typical MacFarlane humour is there that his fans have come to know and love, the cheap shots at everyday life and the occasional black humour moment that makes you laugh despite the fact that you feel it is not a topic that you should be laughing at. To his credit this type of humour works throughout the film but at times it also feels that MacFarlane works too hard to get his comedic point across. For example do we really need to see Foy kick over a hat full of diarrhoea to get the joke, or do we need a close-up of a sheep penis to find the fact the sheep relieves itself on Albert hilarious?

Then there are the parts of the film that work amazingly well. Albert is set up as a character that you are going to like and while some of the characters, such as Clinch, could be described as clichés there are interesting peripheral characters such as Edward (Giovanni Ribisi – Gangster Squad, Ted) and Ruth (Sarah Silverman – Gravy, TV’S Louie), a Christian couple that don’t have sex before marriage despite the fact that she works as a prostitute. It’s these kinds of side stories that certainly keeps the audience focussed on the film and laughing throughout.

When it comes to the acting side of A Million Ways To Die In The West a few of the cast get really smooth runs. Liam Neeson plays Clinch well but it feels like he is in cruise control while at times it almost feels like Charlize Theron is playing herself. Sarah Silverman, Giovanni Ribisi and Neil Patrick Harris all nail their comedic timing, while MacFarlane has shown that he is a good actor when he steps in front of the camera. Hopefully we see him do more of that in the future and not just concentrate on voice work.

A Million Ways To Die In The West is not the kind of comedy that will appeal to everybody, some of the jokes may go into some people’s ‘too crass’ pile, but for others this is going to be the kind of film that you will get laughs at throughout. Maybe not as good as Blazing Saddles but still a worthwhile comedy with a good romantic subplot.

Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: A Million Ways to Die in the West (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘A Million Ways To Die In The West′: For our full A Million Ways To Die In The West review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #81

Trailer:

x-men Days Of Future Past

Summary: The X-Men send Wolverine to the past in a desperate effort to change history and prevent an event that results in doom for both humans and mutants.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 22nd May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK

Director: Bryan Singer

Screenwriter: Simon Kinberg, Jane Goldman (story), Matthew Vaughn (story)

Cast: Andreas Apergis (Col. Sanders), Shawn Ashmore (Bobby/Iceman), Halle Berry (Storm), Mark Camacho (President Nixon), Massimo Cannistraro (Ramone), Adan Canto (Sunspot), Chris Claremont (Congressman Parker), Daniel Cudmore (Colossus), Larry Day (General Caris), Peter Dinklage (Dr. Bolivar Trask), Bingbing Fan (Blink), Michael Fassbender (Erik Lehnsherr), Jan Gerste (Gwen), Josh Helman (Maj. Bill Stryker), Gregor Hlady (General Petrov), Nicholas Hoult (Hank/Beast), Hugh Jackman (Logan/Wolverine), Famke Janssen (Jean Grey), Evan Jonigkeit (Toad), Jennifer Lawrence (Raven/Mystique), Thai-Hoa Le (General Nhuan), Michael Lerner (Senator Brickman), Zehra Leverman (Ms. Maximoff), Morgan Lily (Young Raven), Gregg Lowe (Ink), James Marsden (Scott Summers), James McAvoy (Charles Xavier), Ian McKellan (Magneto), Francois Paquette (Congressman McCarter), Ellen Page (Kitty Pryde), Anna Paquin (Rogue), Evan Peters (Peter/Quicksilver), Booboo Stewart (Warpath), Patrick Stewart (Professor X), Omar Sy (Bishop). Lucas Till (Havok), Len Wein (Congressman Davis)

Runtime: 131 mins

Classification: CTC

OUR X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s X-Men: Days Of Future Past review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Stars(4)

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s X-Men: Days Of Future Past review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3.5)

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s X-Men: Days Of Future Past review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Stars(3.5)

David Griffiths:

It’s not exaggerating to suggest that X-Men: Days Of Future Past is one of the biggest projects ever attempted by Marvel. The idea of bringing together the casts of the original X-Men franchise and X-Men: First Class is enough to make comic book fan begin drooling, actually delivering it to the screen though was something that could have gone horribly wrong. Luckily though director Bryan Singer (Jack The Giant Slayer, Valkyrie) was up to the task and what has been delivered is a visually spectacular comic book film that doesn’t forget about the fact that characterization is something that shouldn’t be left out of a screenplay.

Like most of the films in the X-Men series X-Men: Days OF Future Past is set in the not too distant future. But the world is a very different place. Large robotic creatures known as Sentinels have scoured the Earth killing off any mutants that they have come across while doing the same to any human they find that has the potential of passing down the Mutant X gene to other generations.

A small group of mutants made up of Kitty Pryde (Ellen Page – The East, Touchy Feely), Iceman (Shawn Ashmore – Breaking The Girls, The Barrens) plus others have managed to use Kitty’s time travel skills to escape the Sentinels but even that means living on the run. When they are found by Professor Xavier (Patrick Stewart – Match, Hunting Elephants), Magneto (Sir Ian McKellan – Miss In Her Teens, The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug), Storm (Halle Berry – The Call, Movie 43) and Wolverine (Hugh Jackman – Prisoners, The Wolverine) it is quickly decided that something must be done or soon they will soon be facing their deaths as well.

When it is realised that the whole Sentinel program got off the ground when the world panicked after Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence – American Hustle, The Devil You Know) killed a leading scientist named Dr. Bolivar Trask (Peter Dinklage – Low Down, The Angriest Man In Brooklyn) it is decided that Kitty must pull off the dangerous procedure of shifting the modern day Logan back into his 1970s body so he can stop Mystique in her tracks.

The task doesn’t only pose physical risks to Logan but also means that he is going to have to convince the younger Charles Xavier (James McAvoy –  Muppets Most Wanted, Her), Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender – The Counselor, 12 Years A Slave) and Hank (Nicholas Hoult – Young Ones, Jack The Giant Slayer) that he is who he says he is and that he needs there help.

The massive amount of characters from the X-Men universe that feature in this film could have really caused some problems in the script. But luckily the screenwriting team was up to the task. It doesn’t feel like any character gets left out of the action and to that team’s credit there are some seriously touching moments throughout the film and that all comes down to the characterization of the characters and the relationships between them.

One of the things that will shock fans this time around though is the way  that Singer establishes early on that nobody is safe in this film. An early mutant massacre seems some franchise favorites get killed and as a result of that the audience sits on the edge of their seat throughout wondering who may not actually make it to the end credits. By the time Magneto is picking up a whole sports stadium and dumping it down where Hank, Wolverine and Xavier are you can only wonder if any of them will make it out of there alive.

The well written screenplay also means that some of the actors can really bring their A-Game to this film. James McAvoy is a standout as he portrays the young Charles Xavier as a battling ‘drug addict’ who must either choose between his mutant abilities or being able to walk again. Nicholas Hault again takes a massive step in his career and carries on his good work from Warm Bodies while it seems that the likes of Jackman, Page, Lawrence and co are simply in cruise control but still deliver good performances.

With X-Men: Days Of Future Past is seems that Bryan Singer has brought everything, a great screenplay and amazing special effects to create one of the best films of this franchise. The film also closes with a finale that would have been the perfect way to close off this franchise but the after credit teaser suggests that it will continue on. Still this is a great film that certainly won’t leave fans of the series disappointed. At last one of the blockbusters of 2014 lives up to its hype.

 

Stars(4)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘X-Men: Days Of Future Past′: For our full X-Men: Days Of Future Past review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Recently the hosts of ‘The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show’ came up with their favourite actors here’s who is made their lists.

 

GREG KING’S LIST

Jodie Foster

  • Matt Damon
  • Michael Caine
  • Charles Bronson
  • John Wayne
  • Leonardo DiCaprio
  • Denzel Washington
  • Jack Nicholson
  • Michael Douglas
  • Sean Connery
  • Harrison Ford
  • Tom Cruise
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger
  • Robert De Niro
  • Tom Hanks
  • Jodie Foster

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Russell Crowe

  • Tom Cruise
  • Mickey Rourke
  • Liam Neeson
  • Edward Norton
  • Christian Bale
  • Jack Nicholson
  • Naomi Watts
  • Jean-Claude Van Damme
  • Al Pacino
  • Dustin Hoffman
  • Arnold Schwarznegger
  • Russell Crowe

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Leonardo DiCaprio

  • Russell Crowe
  • Bruce Willis
  • Woody Harrelson
  • Nicolas Cage
  • Emma Watson
  • Steve Carell
  • Michael Cera
  • Jesse Eisenberg
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Emma Stone
  • Ryan Gosling
  • Tom Cruise
  • Brit Marling
  • Ben Affleck
  • Matt Damon
  • Michelle Williams
  • Christian Bale
  • Heath Ledger
  • Stanley Tucci
  • Matthew McConaughey
  • Leonardo DiCaprio

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Humphrey Bogart

  • Will Ferrell
  • Larry David
  • John Cleese
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Leonardo DiCaprio
  • Bruno Ganz
  • Edward G. Robinson
  • John Hurt
  • Viggo Mortensen
  • Chips Rafferty
  • Anthony Hopkins
  • Sean Connery
  • James Gandolfini
  • Sidney Poitiner
  • Robert Duvall
  • Michael Caine
  • Patrick Stewart
  • Michael Fassbender
  • Samuel L. Jackson
  • John Meillion
  • Meryl Streep
  • Harvey Keitel
  • Morgan Freeman
  • Robert De Niro
  • Humphrey Bogart

The Wolverine

Summary: Based on the celebrated comic book arc, this epic action-adventure takes Wolverine (Hugh Jackman), the most iconic character of the X-Men universe, to modern-day Japan. Out of his depth in an unknown world, he will face a host of unexpected and deadly opponents in a life-or-death battle that will leave him forever changed. Vulnerable for the first time and pushed to his physical and emotional limits, he confronts not only lethal samurai steel but also his inner struggle against his own immortality.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 25th July, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, Australia

Director: James Mangold

Screenwriter: Mark Bomback, Scott Frank

Cast: Rila Fukushimia (Yukio), Hugh Jackman (Logan/Wolverine), Famke Janssen (Dr. Jean Grey), Svetlana Khodchenkova (Viper), Kimi (Saki), Qyoko Kudo (Aya), Ryuta Kimura (Hitoshi), Yaeko Kimura (Mieko), Will Yun Lee (Harada), Keiki Matsumoto (Shizu), Ian McKellan (Magneto), Tao Okamoto (Mariko), Hiroyuki Sanada (Shingen), Patrick Stewart (Charles Xavier), Brian Tee (Noburo), Hal Yamamura (Yashida), Ken Yamamura (Young Yashida)

Runtime: 126 mins

Classification:M

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘THE WOLVERINE’’:

David Griffiths:Stars(3) 

Please check Dave’s review of ‘The Wolverine’ that is available on The Helium Entertainment Channel

Greg King: Stars(3)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘The Wolverine’ that is available on Episode 42 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Nick Gardener: Stars(2.5)

Please check Nicks’s review of ‘The Wolverine’ that is available on Episode 42 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  The Wolverine (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Wolverine′: Please check Episode #42 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show for more reviews of ‘The Wolverine’.

Trailer:

Summary: Scrats nutty pursuit of the cursed acorn, which hes been after since the dawn of time, has world-changing consequences a continental cataclysm that triggers the greatest adventure of all for Manny, Diego and Sid. In the wake of these upheavals, Sid reunites with his cantankerous Granny, and the herd encounters a ragtag menagerie of seafaring pirates determined to stop them from returning home.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th June, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 28th November, 2012

Country: United States

Director: Steve Martino, Mike Thurmeier

Screenwriter: Michael Berg, Lori Forte, Jason Fuchs

Cast: Aziz Ansari (Squint (voice)), Joy Behar (Eunice (voice)), Alain Chabat (Silas (voice)), Peter Dinklage (Captain Gutt (voice)), Karen Disher (Scratte (voice)), Aubrey Graham (Ethan (voice)), Nick Frost (Flynn (voice)), Josh Gad (Louis (voice)), Ben Gleib (Marshall (voice)), George Jacobs (Beaver (voice)), Alexa Kahn (Hyrax (voice)), Queen Latifah (Ellie (voice)), Denis Leary (Diego (voice)), John Leguizamo (Sid (voice)), Jennifer Lopez (Shira (voice)), Nicki Minaj (Steffie (voice)), Heather Morris (Katie (voice)), Kunal Nayyar (Gupta (voice)), Keke Palmer (Peaches (voice)), Josh Peck (Eddie (voice)), Simon Pegg (Buck (voice)), Ally Romano (Meaghan (voice)), Ray Romano (Manny (voice)), Seann William Scott (Crash (voice)), Eddie ‘Piolin’ Sotelo (Uncle Fungus (voice)), Patrick Stewart (Ariscratle (voice)), Wanda Sykes (Granny (voice)), Alan Tudyk (Milton (voice)), Chris Wedge (Scrat (voice)), Rebel Wilson (Raz (voice))

Runtime: 88 mins

Classification: PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Ice Age 4: Continental Drift’ Review:

While at times during Ice Age: Continental Drift it seems like the filmmakers behind the series have lost control of their storyline this still ends up being an enjoyable watch that will be loved by both kids and adults alike.

This time around sees Manny (voiced by Ray Romano – Sack’s West, TV’S The Middle) and Ellie (Queen Latifah – Joyful Noise, TV’S Let’s Stay Together) having some parental problems with their daughter, Peaches (Keke Palmer – Rags, TV’S Winx Club). Peaches feels she is old enough to her own thing while Manny still feels that she needs her parents around.

Meanwhile poor old Sid (John Leguizamo – One For The Money, Lincoln Lawyer) is having family issues of his own when his family stop by and dump him with the ‘burden’ that is Granny (Wanda Sykes – The Muppets, TV’S Futurama).

All those problems however seem petty when Scrat’s (Chris Wedge – Ice Age 3: Dawn Of The Dinosaurs, TV’S Family Guy) love for acorns starts a catastrophic shift of Earth that soon sees Manny, Sid, Granny and Diego (Denis Leary – The Amazing Spider-Man, TV’S Rescue Me) stranded on an iceberg while Ellie is left to the save the lives of all the other creatures.

To add to the drama Manny, Sid, Granny and Diego soon find themselves upsetting Captain Gutt (Peter Dinklage – A Little Bit Of Heaven, TV’S Game Of Thrones) and his crew which includes Flynn (Nick Frost – Snow White & The Huntsmen, The Adventure Of Tintin), Shira (Jennifer Lopez – What To Expect When You’re Expecting, The Back-Up Plan) and Raz (Rebel Wilson – What To Expect When You’re Expecting, Struck By Lightning)

At times it feels like screenwriters Michael Berg (Ice Age 3: Dawn Of The Dinosaurs, Ice Age) and Jason Fuchs (Rags, Pitch) have lost their senses by bringing pirates into the Ice Age franchise. The story doesn’t fit comfortable with fans of the franchise yet the duo put so much heart into the script, and a healthy dose of thrills that at the end of the day it doesn’t seem to really matter.

These screenwriters are so talented they also infuse some great lessons centered at teaching children to respect their parents in such a way that the message gets across loud and clear but never once seems preachy.

Ice Age: Continental Drift certainly isn’t the best film in this franchise but it is still an enjoyable watch.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Ice Age 4: Continental Drift: http://www.helium.com/items/2342952-movie-reviews-ice-age-continental-drift-2012.

Rating: 3/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) on IMDb

Summary: As the result of a childhood wish, John Bennett s teddy bear, Ted, came to life and has been by John s side ever since – a friendship that s tested when Lori, John s girlfriend of four years, wants more from their relationship.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th July, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 21st November, 2012

Country: United States

Director: Seth MacFarlane

Screenwriter: Seth MacFarlane, Alec Sulkin, Wellesley Wild

Cast: Jessica Barth (Tami-Lynn), Ryan Butcher (Callum Oldfield), Ted Danson (himself), Kristina Ellery (Heavenly), Sarah Fischer (Sauvignon Blanc), Ginger Gonzaga (Gina), Lydia Hannibal (Ellen), Norah Jones (herself), Sam J. Jones (himself), Tm Kenny (SpongeBob SquarePants (voice)), Mila Kunis (Lori Collins), Katelyn Lorren (Cherene), Seth MacFarlane (Ted (voice)), Bretton Manley (Young John), Joel McHale (Rex), Ed McMahon (himself), Aedin Mincks (Robert), Melissa Ordway (Michelle), Ryan Reynolds (Jared), Ray Romano (himself), Giovanni Ribisi (Donny), Colton Shires (Teenage John), Tom Skerritt (himself), Bill Smitrovich (Frank), Chanty Sok (Angelique), Patrick Stewart (Narrator), Jessica Stroup (Tracy), Mark Wahlberg (John Bennett), Matt Walsh (Thomas), Laura Vandervoort (Tanya), John Viener (Alix), Patrick Warburton (Guy), Robert Wu (Ming)

Runtime: 106 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Ted’ Review:

When a film has the power to have a whole audience in stitches, reduce three to have asthma attacks and have others laughing so much that they are almost falling into the aisles in stitches you know that you are onto a comedy that achieves its aim. That is exactly what happened at the first screening of Ted in Melbourne.

From the pen of Family Guy creator Seth MacFarlane comes Ted the story of John Bennett (Mark Wahlberg – Contraband, The Fighter) a man who as a boy wished that his teddy bear, Ted (voiced by Seth MacFarlane – TV’S Family Guy & The Cleveland Show) could talk.

In a Christmas miracle Ted to begin talk and soon became a celebrity but as the years went by his star begin to fade and he turned into a foul-mouthed, bad tempered teddy bear. Now John is faced with a challenge get rid of his life-long buddy or risk losing his beautiful girlfriend, Lori (Mila Kunis – Friends With Benefits, Black Swan).

Meanwhile Lori’s boss Rex (Joel McHale – TV’S Community, The Big Year) is making a play for Lori while Donny (Giovanni Ribisi – Contraband, The Rum Diary) is hell-bent on stealing Ted for his creepy son.

MacFarlane’s pen takes Ted into all kinds of areas of ‘wrong’ humor yet you can’t help but laughing at all of them – he certainly takes hold of the old saying ‘if you’re going to offend someone, offend everyone’. To be blunt MacFarlane has actually created one of the funniest scripts of all time… it’s crass but still high brow.

Lots of filmmakers have promised that their romantic comedy is going to be a ‘rom com with a difference’ but they nearly always end up following the same formula as all the ones before it, but Ted is the one that bucks that trend. Yes it has a foul-mouthed teddy bear but at the end the day this is a romance that is basically a girlfriend asking a boyfriend to change… but it’s the creative way that MacFarlane does it that makes it a winner.

The other big winners from Ted are Mila Kunis and Mark Wahlberg. Both continue to show that they have the skills to make a comedy funny while they are brilliantly supported by the likes of Joel McHale, Giovanni Ribisi and Patrick Warburton (Sophomore, Action Hero) who all benefit from the fact that MacFarlane realizes the importance of support characters. In fact Joel McHale just shows that his comedy timing in the hit television show Community is no fluke… he is certainly one of the comedy finds of this generation.

Ted is a sensational comedy that will have you laughing from start to finish. Just remember if your asthmatic to take along your Ventolin and maybe a sewing kit just in case you found yourself doubled over or in the aisle in stiches. To be blunt Ted is one of the funniest comedies to surface in a long, long time.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Ted’: http://www.helium.com/items/2343569-movie-reviews-ted-2012.

Rating: 5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating:Ted (2012) on IMDb