Tagged: Ryan Corr

 

Thanks to our good friends at Icon Films Subculture has two 1% packs to give away. Each pack will contain a copy of 1% on DVD and a limited edition 1% stubby holder.

To WIN simply go to our Facebook page and private message us the name of one of the stars of 1%.

1% is directed by Stephen McCallum (Hunger, Inferno) and stars Ryan Corr (The Water Diviner, Wolf Creek 2), Abbey Lee (Mad Max: Fury Road, Gods Of Egypt), Aaron Pederson (Mystery Road, Goldstone), Simone Kessell (San Andreas, Of Kings And Prophets) and Josh McConville (The Merger, The Infinite Man) and tells a story of brotherhood, loyalty, ambition and betrayal, set within the world of Australian motorcycle gangs. This modern day Macbeth follows Paddo, heir to the throne of the Copperheads MC who must assume the mantle whilst club leader Knuck does time in jail. Paddo’s vision for the club’s future and compromises he must make for his mentally disabled brother sets the stage for the ultimate power play.

1% will be released on DVD through Icon on the 6th March 2019.

DVD Packshot

Summary: In the very near future, creatures from ancient mythology must live among humans and battle for survival in a world that wants to silence, exploit and destroy them.

Year: 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: 1st September 2016

Country: Australia

Directors: Wayne Blair (4 episodes), Leah Purcell (2 episode)

Screenwriters: Jane Allen (1 episode), Jon Bell (2 episodes), Michael Miller (6 episodes)

Main Cast: Jada Alberts (Nerida West), Tony Briggs (Boondee), Rob Collins (Waruu West) , Ryan Corr (Blair Finch) , Stef Dawson (Ash Kerry), Iain Glen (Jarrod Slade),  Marcus Graham (McIntyre), Rarriwuy Hick (Latani), Deborah Mailman (Aunty Linda), Andrew McFarlane (Matthews) , Frances O’Connor (Charlotte Cleary), Hunter Page-Lochard (Koen West), Tamala Shelton (Alinta West), Tyson Towney (Djukara), Tasma Walton (Araluen)

Sub Cast: Jeremy Ambrum (Jake) – 5 episodes, Benson Jack Anthony (Gub) – 5 episodes, Lilly Bader (Lilly) – 1 episode, Adam Briggs (Maliyan) – 6 episodes, Jack Charles (Uncle Jimmy) – 1 episode), Jerome Cosgrave (Jumbhi) – 3 episodes, Lynette Curran (Virgil) – 2 episodes, Nancy Denis (Eve) – 5 episodes, Isaac Drandic (Harry) – 5 episodes, Kamil Ellis (Mungo) – 6 episodes, Rhondda Findleton (Frankie) – 5 episodes, Sean Hawkins (Joel) – 1 Episode, Aileen Huynh (Everick) – 3 episodes, Trevor Jamieson (Uncle Max) – 5 episodes, Jack Kingsley (Aiden) – 1 episode, Alexis Lane (Kora) – 6 episodes, Kathy Marika (Ngumunga) – 2 episodes, Rosharyn Marr (Young Koen) – 1 episode, Julian Maroude (Anton) – 1 episode, Jack Mars (Cameron) – 1 episode, Josh McConville (Dickson) – 3 episodes, Robyn Nevin (Jane O’Grady) – 1 episode, Sam Paronson (Taki) – 1 episode, Rahel Romahn (Ludo) – 1 epsiode, Mark Simpson (Holbeck) – 1 episode, Waverley Stanley Jnr. (Kulya) – 6 episodes, Miranda Tapsall (Lena) – 1 epsiode, Jenny Templeton (Alice) – 1 episode, Ben Toyer (Jamie) – 1 episode, Elijah Valadian-Wilson (Young Waruu) – 3 episodes, Katie Wall (Rowena) – 3 episodes, Leeanna Walsman (Belinda) – 4 episodes, Val Weldon (Jirra) – 2 episodes, Georgia Wilde (Melissa) – 1 episode, Matthew Wilkinson (Kennedy) – 2 episodes, Dylan Young (Nick) – 1 episode,

Runtime: 6 x 50 mins eps

Classification: MA15+

 

CLEVERMAN SEASON 1 REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths:

The Australian film industry has always had an interesting relationship with the genre of television. Over the years we’ve produced some pretty decent sci-fi programs – shows like ‘Farscape’ and ‘Spellbinder’ immediately spring to mind, but for some reason the people providing the money for the industry seem to shy away from the genre, instead looking to push more dour dramas onto the audience. Well now comes a sci-fi show that will hopefully change all of that – Cleverman. Mark my words this show is guaranteed to become a cult classic… it’s just that damn good.

Cleverman is set in the future, a time when Sydney is living under the threat of ‘hairies’ – a so called ‘subhuman’ species who are currently being considered a threat. People react different to the ‘hairies’, Governmental departments led by the likes of Geoff Matthews (Andrew McFarlane – ‘The Flying Doctors’) and McIntyre (Marcus Graham – ‘Mulholland Drive’) see them as a threat that needs to be contained and eventually eradicated. Business-men like Jarrod Slade (Iain Glen – ‘Game Of Thrones’) see them as a way of making a mountain money, while small-time operators like Koen West (Hunter Page-Lochard – ‘Spear’) and his best mate, Blair Finch (Ryan Corr – ‘The Water Diviner’) also see them as a cash cow. Then there are people like Waruu West (Rob Collins – ‘The Wrong Girl’) who are sworn to protect them as they see the treatment of the ‘hairies’ as the same way their Aboriginal ancestors were treated.

It is hard to put into words just how good ‘Cleverman’ really is. This sci-fi goes a lot further than most other shows in the genre and gets so political at times it makes you see Australian history in a whole different light. The screenwriters of this show have taken the wrongs of Australia’s past and condensed into such a format that anybody can see just how wrong the Government have handled things such as the stolen generation and Aboriginal deaths in Police custody over the years. Like the feature film, ‘Red Billabong’, ‘Cleverman’ also explores Aboriginal culture and mythology… two things I’ve probably learnt more about watching this television show then I ever did in my year at high school.

The political side of things pushed to the background this show also works because of the relationships between each of the characters. The growth surrounding the character of Koen has to be seen to be believed and the resulting conflict that these changes cause with his half-brother Waruu ignite the second half of this season. The real test comes when the audience sits in suspense as you wait to see which brother is going to make the right decisions in the season finale.

The hard edged nature of this show also lifts the program high above most other shows airing on television at the moment. Yes there are moments of violence as hairies and humans clash but is things such as a character knowing impregnating his wife with a hairy for scientific research and a hairy being forced into a sick form of prostitution that really makes this program stand out from the pack.

The edgy nature of the program also brings out the best in its cast. Aussie favourites like Tasma Walton (‘Blue Heelers’) and Deborah Mailman (‘The Secret Life Of Us’) are standouts in their strong roles but the stand out here is Iain Glen who dominates the acting stakes as he plays the mysterious Slade whose intentions are often questionable. Credit must also be paid to Hunter Page-Lochard and Rob Collins who both announce themselves as actors to watch in the future with strong performances that make this show a must see.

While firmly planted in the sci-fi genre ‘Cleverman’ is a show that takes a deep look at Aboriginal history and social issues while also providing enough believable drama between its characters to make you want to watch each week. The fact that Season One builds up to a crescendo that looks set to explode in Season Two means this is a show that you have to watch if you haven’t already done so.

Stars(5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):   Stars(5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Cleverman (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Cleverman Season 1 reviews: Nil.

 

Trailer:

Wolf Creek 2 Poster

Summary: The outback once more becomes a place of horror as another unwitting tourist becomes the prey for crazed, serial-killing pig-shooter Mick Taylor.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 20th February, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Greg Mclean

Screenwriter: Greg Mclean, Aaron Sterns

Cast: Shannon Ashlyn (Katarina Schmidt), Chloe Boreham (Lucille), Annie Byron (Lil), Shane Connor (Senior Sergeant Gary Bulmer Jnr.), Ryan Corr (Paul Hammersmith), Ben Gerrard (Cop), John Jarratt (Mick Taylor), Gerard Kennedy (Jack), Phillipe Klaus (Rutger Enqvist)

Runtime: 104 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR WOLF CREEK 2 REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(3)

Please check Adam’s Wolf Creek 2 review of that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #68

Greg King: Stars(3)

Please check Greg’s Wolf Creek 2 review of that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(3)

Please check Greg’s Wolf Creek 2 review of that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

David Griffiths:

The original Wolf Creek film stood out because it brought something new to the horror genre… which at the times was starting to get a little stale. Director Greg Mclean did something a little different with the film. Not only was it beautifully shot as it captured the beauty of the Australian outback but it also mixed a regular thriller style film with the true gory horror of something like Hostel or Saw.

This time around though Mclean has decided to mess with the formula a little. Mclean seems to have taken on board some of the criticisms (albeit that some were completely unfair) of the first film and tried to fix that while also keeping to the horror genre rule that the sequel to a film always needs to be bigger and better than the first film. Whether that makes it better or not though… well that is another story again.

Wolf Creek 2 again sees the return of one of Australia’s most notorious serial killers, the brutal Mick Taylor (John Jarratt). This time Mick finds himself under the gun from scene one with Police Officer Senior Sergeant Gary Bulmer Jnr. (Shane Connor) trying to make life hell for them.

Once he has overcome that little hurdle though Mick soon finds himself chasing backpackers again – in the form of Katarina Schmidt (Shannon Ashlyn) and Rutger Enqvist (Phillipe Klaus) although he again runs into trouble when meddling Englishman Paul Hammersmith (Ryan Corr) begins to get in the way of all his plans.

This is kind of horror film that fans of the genre are either going to really love or really hate. Things such as giving Mick a bit of a comical edge is certainly going to divide fans. On one hand it does create a bit of a buffer for Mclean seeing that this time around we see a more sinister edge to Taylor but at the same time horror purists are certainly going to argue that it does hold the film back a bit.

Perhaps the biggest thing that needs addressing with Wolf Creek 2 is that it feels like Mclean has almost made this three films in one. First of all it’s Mick vs The Cops, then it’s Mick vs The Germans and then lastly Mick vs Paul, and to be really honest the film doesn’t kick into top gear at all until the third storyline, especially when we finally get to see into Mick’s lair.

Mclean it seems is also very proud to show off some of Australia’s rich film history with Wolf Creek 2. There is certainly some scenes that seem to pay tribute to some great Australia Ozploitation flicks such as Turkey Shoot or Fair Game while the car chases could have come straight out of any of the Mad Max films. But no chases featuring big rigs or CGI kangaroos is going to make up for the fact that for most of Wolf Creek 2 the story badly lets it down.

When it comes to the acting Wolf Creek 2 certainly doesn’t test it’s cast too much. John Jarratt seems to handle the change of being an intense character with some comedy elements pretty well… but then what do you expect from an actor who over the years has done things as broad as hosting a Home And Gardens renovations show and also a kid’s show. The acting talents of Aussie greats like Shane Connor and Gerrard Kennedy seem wasted in their roles while Ryan Corr does his best to get noticed but even he isn’t given a massive amount to work with.

There is no simple way to say it. Wolf Creek 2 is good but for very different reasons to the original Wolf Creek. Kudos to Greg Mclean for sticking to his guns and making a politically incorrect horror but purists of the genre should be warned that there may be one or two things that you don’t approve of.

Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Wolf Creek 2 (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Wolf Creek 2′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #68 for our full Wolf Creek 2 review.

Trailer:

Wolf Creek 2 Poster

A new Wolf Creek 2 clip has been released. The film which is directed by Greg Mclean and stars John Jarratt, Ryan Corr and Shannon Ashlyn will be released in Australia on the 20th Feb, 2014.

You can view the Wolf Creek 2 clip below.

 

 

 

 

The Sapphires

And the nominees are:

FEATURE FILM

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FILM
Burning Man
Lore
The Sapphires
Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
Jonathan Teplitzky, Burning Man
Cate Shortland, Lore
Wayne Blair, The Sapphires
Kieran Darcy-Smith, Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Burning Man
Mental
Not Suitable For Children
Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Lore
The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Burning Man
Lore
The Sapphires
Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING
Burning Man
The Sapphires
Wish You Were Here
X

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND
Burning Man
Lore
The Sapphires
Swerve

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE
33 POSTCARDS
A Few Best Men
Mental
Not Suitable For Children

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
Burning Man
Killer Elite
Lore
The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Burning Man
Lore
Mental
The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR
Joel Edgerton, Wish You Were Here
Matthew Goode, Burning Man
Chris O’Dowd, The Sapphires
Guy Pearce, 33 POSTCARDS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS
Toni Collette, Mental
Deborah Mailman, The Sapphires
Felicity Price, Wish You Were Here
Sarah Snook, Not Suitable For Children

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Ryan Corr, Not Suitable For Children
Liev Schreiber, Mental
Antony Starr, Wish You Were Here
Gary Waddell, The King Is Dead!

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Essie Davis, Burning Man
Rebecca Gibney, Mental
Deborah Mailman, Mental
Jessica Mauboy, The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST YOUNG ACTOR
Brenna Harding, Puberty Blues
Ed Oxenbould, Julian
Saskia Rosendahl, Lore
Lily Sullivan, Mental

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Iron Sky
Killer Elite
The Sapphires
Utopia Girls — How Women Won The Vote

AACTA RAYMOND LONGFORD AWARD
Al Clark

TELEVISION

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CHILDREN’S TELEVISION SERIES
The Adventures of Figaro Pho
Dance Academy — Series 2
Flea-bitten!
Guess How Much I Love You — The Adventures of Little Nutbrown Hare

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION COMEDY SERIES
A Moody Christmas
Danger 5
Lowdown — Season 2
Shaun Micallef’s Mad As Hell

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION SERIES
Adam Hills In Gordon Street Tonight — Series 2
Agony Aunts
Gruen Sweat
The Hamster Wheel — Series 1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST REALITY TELEVISION SERIES
The Amazing Race Australia
MasterChef Australia — Series 4
My Kitchen Rules — Series 3
The Voice

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES
Puberty Blues
Rake — Season 2
Redfern Now
Tangle — Season 3

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEFEATURE OR MINI SERIES
Beaconsfield
Devil’s Dust
Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Underground

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN TELEVISION
The Amazing Race Australia
Beaconsfield
Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Jack Irish: Bad Debts

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN TELEVISION
A Moody Christmas — Episode 5 “Water Under the Bridge”
Lowdown — Season 2 — Episode 3 “One Fine Gay”
Puberty Blues — Episode 5
Redfern Now — Episode 6 “Pretty Boy Blue”

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Jimi Bani, Mabo
Anthony Hayes, Devil’s Dust
Lachy Hulme, Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Richard Roxburgh, Rake — Season 2

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Ashleigh Cummings, Puberty Blues
Essie Davis, Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries
Susie Porter, Dangerous Remedy
Leah Purcell, Redfern Now

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Luke Carroll, Redfern Now
Abe Forsythe, Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Aaron Jeffrey, Underbelly Badness
Dan Wyllie, Puberty Blues

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Shareena Clanton, Redfern Now
Mandy McElhinney, Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Susan Prior, Puberty Blues
Laura Wheelwright, Underground

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE IN A TELEVISION COMEDY
Patrick Brammall, A Moody Christmas
Barry Crocker, The Strange Calls
Damon Herriman, Laid — Series 2
Frank Woodley, Woodley

SHORT FILM

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT ANIMATION
The Hunter
LEGO Star Wars: The Padawan Menace
The Maker
Sleight of Hand

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT FICTION FILM
B I N O
Dumpy Goes to the Big Smoke
Julian
Transmission

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN A SHORT FILM
B I N O
Dumpy Goes to the Big Smoke
Julian
Transmission

DOCUMENTARY

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FEATURE LENGTH DOCUMENTARY
A Common Purpose
The Curse of the Gothic Symphony
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Storm Surfers 3D

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY UNDER ONE HOUR
All the Way
I Can Change Your Mind About Climate
The Man Who Jumped
Then the Wind Changed

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY SERIES
Go Back to Where You Came From
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta
Singapore 1942 – End of Empire
Sporting Nation

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN A DOCUMENTARY
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Fighting Fear
Go Back to Where You Came From
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY IN A DOCUMENTARY
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Fighting Fear
Go Back to Where You Came From
Storm Surfers 3D

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING IN A DOCUMENTARY
Chateau Chunder — A Wine Revolution
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta
Storm Surfers 3D

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND IN A DOCUMENTARY
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta
Paul Kelly — Stories of Me
Singapore 1942 – End of Empire