Tagged: Ryan Gosling

Summary:

A look at the life of the astronaut, Neil Armstrong, and the legendary space mission that led him to become the first man to walk on the Moon on July 20, 1969.

Year: 2018

Australian Cinema Release Date: 11th October 2018

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Damien Chazelle

Screenwriter: Josh Singer, James R. Hansen (based on the book by)

Cast: Christopher Abbott (Dave Scott), Mark Armstrong (Paul Haney), Chandler Barron (Scott Carpenter), Skyler Bible (Richard Gordon), Connor Colton Blodgett (Mark Armstrong), Leon Bridges (Gil Scott-Heron), Callie Brown (Young Bonnie White), Kyle Chandler (Deke Slayton), Jason Clarke (Ed White), Steve Coulter (Guenter Wendt), Ethan Embry (Pete Conrad), J.D. Evermore (Chris Kraft), Ryan Clay Forbes (Bill Anders), Claire Foy (Janet Armstrong), Patrick Fugit (Eliott See), Matthew Glave (Chuck Yaeger), Ryan Gosling (Neil Armstong), Edmund Grant (Older Ed White Jnr.), Choppy Guillotte (John Young), Lukas Haas (Mike Collins), Oliver Hamilton (Pat White), James R. Hansen (Dr. Kurt Debus), Robert Hatch (Joe Schmitt), Braydyn Nash Helms (Young Eddie White Jnr.), Ciaran Hinds (Bob Gilruth), Helen S. Jackson (Louise Sheron), Brian d’Arcy James (Joe Walker), Shaun Eric Jones (Wally Schirra), Jonathon Kankolenski (Young Edward Higgins II), John F. Kennedy (himself – archive), Michael Lee Kimel (Bill Moon), William Gregory Lee (Gordon Cooper), Dutin Lewis (Ralph Morse), George Linkenback (Col. Frank Borman), Ben Owen (John Hodge), Greg Puckett (Charles Berry), Willie Repoley (Jim Fucci), Kermit Rolison (George Mueller), Pablo Schreiber (Jim Lovell), Margo Schroeder (June Hoffman Armstrong), Brady Smith (Butch Butchart), Claire Smith (Older Bonnie White), Corey Michael Smith (Roger Chaffee), Lucy Brooke Stafford (Karen Armstrong), Andrew Stahl (Ken Mattingly), Jim Stearns (David Hammock), Corey Stoll (Buzz Aldrin), Kris Swanberg (Marilyn See), William G. Tomek (Donald Babbitt), Kurt Vonnegut Jr. (himself – archive), Kent Wagner (Fred Haise), Gavin Warren (Young Rick Armstrong), John David Whalen (John Glenn), Shea Whigham (Gus Grissom), Luke Winters (Older Rick Armstrong), Perry Zulu Jnr. (Robert Lawrence)

Runtime: 141 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR FIRST MAN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

 

When you think of space exploration we now days think of the romanticised Hollywood version of space travel. Unless you can think back to realistic movies like Apollo 13 it is easy to forget that it only takes a second for space exploration to become a nightmare for all involved. Sure we have sci-fi movies like Aliens that enhance the extra-terrestrial horror that many believe might be out there, somewhere, but very few films capture the horrors of the unknown and the impact it had on its first explorers like First Man does.

Director Damian Chazelle (Whiplash, La La Land) doesn’t have to develop scary looking aliens in order to create horror for intrepid test pilot and engineer Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling – Drive, Blue Valentine) and his wife Janet (Claire Foy – Season Of The Witch, Vampire Academy). Like he did with Whiplash Chazelle just shows human life in its purest form… which for this family provided more horror than most couples could withstand. From the loss of their daughter which led to Armstrong joining the NASA Space Program in the first place, dangerous test missions that place Neil’s life in danger nearly every day through to the anguish that Janet endures on the days she knows that her husband is doing such tests. Chazelle just stirs the pot and lets the human emotions in the film bubble and boil until they explode.

Neil and Janet’s solace come from their best friends Ed White (Jason Clarke – Zero Dark Thirty, Terminator Genisys), his wife Pat (Olivia Hamilton – Don’t Worry He Won’t Get Far On Foot, The Last Tycoon) and Neil’s immediate boss the caring yet determined Deke Slayton (Kyle Chandler – Friday Night Lights, Argo). Even so Pat and Janet’s ‘talking’ is normally disguised as children’s play dates, Neil seems happy to talk to Ed about the mission but pushes him away when the talk turns personal and while Deke does what he can to help his test pilots at the same time he is the man who has to make tough calls like switching off intercoms so wives can’t hear their husbands in peril and writing death announcements for missions he has to appear to be ‘confident’ for.

First Man could have easily suffered from Titanic-syndrome, a film where the audience knows the ultimate outcome and therefore just sits on the edge of their seat waiting for the expected finale but here Chazelle, who is aided brilliantly by his screenwriter Josh Singer (The West Wing, The Post), takes the audience on a different kind of journey. He captures moments they never told us about during our High School science classes. The raw, claustrophobic feel a test pilot feels as he hurled into orbit in what seems like a sardine can that they aren’t even sure will make the journey, the moments that wives find out that their husbands haven’t returned from a flight and the protests that occurred in America when the loss of life made people realise that these test pilots were really guinea pigs in what seemed like a cruel experiment. Then of course there is the tension an astronaut’s job puts on his family life and here we see painful moments such as the one where Janet has to plead with Neil to tell his children that he may not come back from his moon mission.

Just like he did with Whiplash Chazelle also brings out the best in his cast and helps them bring their character’s pain and anguish to the fore. Claire Foy delivers her best role to date and if she doesn’t at least receive an Oscar nomination for this performance then something is seriously wrong. As an actress she delivers on every level as Janet is put through an emotional ringer and these are the kinds of performances that the Academy should be applauding – ones that test an actress and her acting abilities. Equally good is Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong. When cast as an All-American hero, a real life Captain America if you will, you wouldn’t expect an actor to have to become emotional dark and foreboding, but that is exactly what is expected of Gosling here. Forget his pretty boy looks because here Gosling calls on the acting skills that saw him create memorable characters in films like Drive or The Place Beyond The Pines… he is absolutely brilliant.

First Man is the first film of 2018 that I have seen where my thought throughout was ‘this needs to be an Oscar film.’ From start to finish it felt like the film was taking me on a claustrophobic ride with its characters. The sequences in which the pilots are conducting test flights are moments of sheer cinematic masterpiece, where visuals and sound effects come together in a way that creates a horror that you never expected. This combined by outstanding dramatic acting performances from its leads and again I find myself putting the five stars down on a Damian Chazelle film. First Man is sheer brilliance, a lesson in dramatic filmmaking.

 

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): 

 

 

IMDB Rating: First Man (2018) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment First Man Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

 

FeatureBladeRunnerRemake

Director Denis Villeneuve has given us a first look at his dystopian universe that has been created for the Blade Runner sequel that he is currently working on.

Villeneuve has told the press “I’ve always been attracted to science-fiction films with strong visual signatures that lead us into unique parallel worlds and the original ‘Blade Runner’ is by far the best of all time. Ridley Scott had the genius to blend science-fiction and film noir to create this unique exploration of human condition. The new ‘Blade Runner’ is an extension of the first movie a few decades later.

Sony also released the following information about the film:

Denis Villeneuve (SicarioPrisoners) is directing and principal photography is scheduled to begin this month.  The film will be released by Warner Bros. in North America and Sony Pictures Releasing International will distribute in all media for all overseas territories.

The sequel is set several decades after the 1982 original, with Harrison Ford reprising his iconic role as Rick Deckard. The film is written by Hampton Fancher and Michael Green, and succeeds the initial story by Fancher and David Peoples based on Philip K. Dick’s novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. Story details are not being revealed.

Cast includes:  Ryan Gosling, Harrison Ford, Robin Wright, Ana de Armas, Sylvia Hoeks, Carla Juri, Mackenzie Davis, Barkhad Abdi, Dave Bautista, David Dastmalchian and Hiam Abbass.

Frank Giustra and Tim Gamble, CEO’s of Thunderbird Films, will serve as executive producers. Ridley Scott will also executive produce. Bill Carraro will executive produce.

Untitled Blade Runner Sequel releases in Australia October 5, 2017.

The Big Short

Summary: When America’s banks collapsed a few years ago the world was told a lie. The world was told that nobody, not even the top financial experts, saw it coming. That was only partially true, yes the top financial experts didn’t see it coming, but some men did.

The Big Short tells the story of those men, men the world didn’t listen to. Michael Burry (Christian Bale) ran a small, but successful, financial firm and he saw the crash happening but due to the fact that he didn’t dress the way they did and liked to drum to Metallica in his office nobody really listened. The one person who did listen was Wall Street trader Jared Vennett (Ryan Gosling) who then went against the bank who he worked for and decided that this was a way to make money… betting against the bank. A misplaced phone call by him then tipped off Hedge Fund Manager Mark Baum (Steve Carrell) who then convinced Vennett to join him on his crusade against Wall Street.

The chain then kept going as eager young investors Charlie Geller (John Magaro) and Jamie Shipley (Finn Wittrock) found a copy of Baum’s flyer and also decide that can make money off what is happening. Not experienced in making the trades they need to do to do so they rope in retired banker Ben Rickert (Brad Pitt) to help them out.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th January 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Adam McKay

Screenwriter: Charles Randolph, Adam McKay, Michael Lewis (book)

Cast: Christian Bale (Michael Burry), Tony Bentley (Bruce Miller), Anthony Bourdain (himself), Lyle Brocato (Casey), Steve Carrell (Mark Baum), Vanessa Cloke (Lucy), Rudy Eisenzopf (Lewis Ranieri), Peter Epstein (Paul Baum), Aidan Flowers (Young Michael Burry), Karen Gillan (Evie), Selena Gomez (herself), Ryan Gosling (Jared Vennett), Jeffry Griffin (Chris), Nick Hwang (Josh Medak), Jay Jablonski (Matt), Rajeev Jacob (Deeb), Tyler Kunkle (Doug), Colin Lawless (Nicolas Burry), Melissa Leo (Georgia Hale), Tracy Letts (Lawrence Fields), Hamish Linklater (Porter Collins), John Magaro (Charlie Geller), Byron Mann (Mr. Chau), Adepero Oduye (Kathy Tao), Wayne Pere (Martin Blaine), Brad Pitt (Ben Rickert), Margot Robbie (herself), Rafe Spall (Danny Moses), Ilan Srulovicz (Noah), Jeremy Strong (Vinnie Diesel), Richard Thaler (himself), Marisa Tomei (Cynthia Baum), Finn Wittrock (Jamie Shipley), Stanley Wong (Ted Jiang)

Runtime: 130 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR THE BIG SHORT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

When director Adam McKay set about making The Big Short he must have wondered whether or not he could pull off this project. McKay had established himself as a comedy director, a great comedy director to be precise… the man who brought us movies such as Anchorman and Step Brothers etc, but still it was ambitious to decide to make a comedy-drama about the collapse of America’s biggest banks. After all the minuet details of how and why the banks collapsed is so technical and boring it would not only go right over the head of the average cinema goer, but also have a strong chance of making them lapse into some kind of a coma if you bothered to explain it properly. Yes The Big Short was an uphill battle all the way but somehow McKay has made this into one of the films of the year.

So how does McKay make this film work so well? The answer is simple. He does what so many filmmakers are scared of doing these days… and that is be creative. To put it into ‘banker speak’ he thought outside the box. Instead of having a series of long explanations of what exactly is happening with all the financial stuff McKay will allow the film’s story to pause for a moment while Margot Robbie (sitting in a bubble bath as herself) explains what is happening or he will cross to a celebrity chef comparing the market to bad fish. It sounds as strange as all hell… but it works and gets the point across in a way that the audience can understand without putting them asleep.

That being said it isn’t creative ‘gimmicks’ like that which make The Big Short work so well. No McKay is aided by a screenplay that is simply one of the best screenplays to surface out of Hollywood for a long, long time. While it expertly reveals a lot of the greed and shame of Wall Street it is also about strong characters and consists of some of the wittiest one-liners you are ever likely to hear. To the credit of the screenplay you actually come to know and love these characters. You feel sorry for Mark Baum and the personal tragedy that he has suffered in his life while you find yourself barracking for the likes of Michael Burry who are putting everything on the line and copping abuse for doing so. Even though so of the characters are quite unlikable, such as Jared Vennett, the screenwriters have been smart enough to get them to deliver the quips that make people laugh in a bid to make them at least a little likable. Yes the unthinkable happens in this film, you actually like bankers.

Of course that brilliant script also allows the actors involved to deliver some of the finest acting performances of the year. Steve Carrell showed us his serious side in Foxcatcher and here he once again revels in what is a demanding but emotional performance. If he takes an Oscar home for this performance he truly deserves it. Likewise Christian Bale who loses all of his Bruce Wayne good looks as he morphs into the hard rocking recluse Michael Burry so well that you forget who you are watching. The other true chameleon here is Brad Pitt who is completely unrecognisable as the bearded off-the-grid former banker Ben Rickert. These three lead an ensemble that makes this film truly memorable.

Sure a film about the banking world might not exactly make you feel like you want to rush out and purchase tickets at the box office, but like Wall Street and The Wolf Of Wall Street before it The Big Short is a ground-breaking film that shows a completely different side to the filmmaking skills of Adam McKay. Creative, original and hard-hitting The Big Short is a film that I’m sure I’ll be revisiting when I put together my Top 10 Movies of 2016 list.

 

Stars(5)

 

Adam Ross:

You can listen to Adam’s The Big Short review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #161

 

Stars(4)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4.5)

 

IMDB Rating: The Big Short (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment The Big Short reviews: You can listen to our full Big Short Review  review on a The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #161. You can also read our The Big Short review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘The Big Short,’ ‘The 5th Wave,’ ‘Goosebumps,’ ‘Carol,’ and ‘Sucker’. This episode also contains interviews with Steve Carrell, Christian Bale, Ryan Gosling, Chloe Grace Moretz, Nick Robinson, Alex Roe, Maika Monroe, Jack Black, Slappy, Cate Blanchett, Rooney Mara, John Luc, Michael Shanks (‘The Wizards of Aus’) and Louise Malcolm (Gasworks Cinema).

To listen to the show or can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Dane DeHaan

In acting stakes of the finds of 2013 has been of the young star Dane DeHaan. He first wowed audiences when he portrayed troubled young writer Lucien Carr opposite Daniel Radcliffe in the acclaimed film “Kill Your Darlings.” But, by far, DeHaan’s breakthrough role in 2013 was that of Trip as heavy metal artists Metallica returned to the big screen in “Metallica Through The Never.”

Dane William DeHaan was born on Feb. 6, 1986 in Allentown, Pennsylvania. His father, Jeff DeHaan, is a computer programmer and his mother, Cynthia, is an executive at Knolls Furniture. DeHaan begun his schooling at Emmaus High School (in Pennsylvania) but ended up graduating from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.

While still at school DeHaan had a small role in the film “A.K.A.: It’s A Wiley World” and also appeared in the short film “Woodrow Wilson.” It was upon his graduation from UNCSA in 2008 that his career really took off and he soon found himself as the understudy for Haley Joel Osment in the Broadway production of “American Buffalo.”

Soon DeHaan found himself acting in another short film, “Stormy Weather,” before landing his first television role in 2008 in the popular crime series “Law & Order: Special Victim’s Unit.” From there DeHaan found himself acting in the television movies “At Risk” and “The Front” before appearing in feature film “Amigo” alongside Chris Cooper.

In 2010, DeHaan returned to the short film format in “The Layla Project” before landing two television roles that would make him a household name. He first appeared in the Gabriel Byrne led series “In Treatment” before appearing in three episodes of the hit adult vampire series “True Blood.” 2010 also saw DeHaan make a name for himself in theatre circles when he was nominated for an Obie Award for his work on the off-Broadway production of “The Aliens,” which also incidentally won the “Play Of The Year” award from “The New York Times.”

DeHaan’s string of hits on the big screen then began in 2012 when he portrayed Andrew Detmer in the camcorder science-fiction flick, “Chronicle.” The film became a hit at the box office and DeHaan soon followed it up with a role opposite Juno Temple and Kylie Minogue in “Jack And Diane.” DeHaan then starred with Tom Hardy, Shia LeBeouf and Guy Pearce in John Hillcoat’s “Lawless” before sharing the screen with Ryan Gosling in “The Place Beyond The Pines” and Daniel Day-Lewis in the Oscar-nominated “Lincoln.”

The critical success continued with “Kill Your Darlings” and Reese Witherspoon’s “Devil’s Knot” before appearing in the eagerly anticipated “Metallica Through The Never,” which was directed by Nimrod Antal. DeHaan teaming up with Metallica also saw another honor bestowed upon DeHaan when the band played under the name DeHaan at the Orion Festival

When it comes to his private life, DeHaan has always kept things out of the press; however, it is known that he began dating actress Anna Wood (whom DeHaan appeared with in “Chronicle”) in 2006 and the pair became married on June 30, 2012.

2013 may have been the year that DeHaan really made a name for himself, but cinema-goers can expect to see a lot more of this young star very soon as he is about to appear in comedy film “Life After Beth” with Aubrey Plaza and Anna Kendrick and “Life” with Robert Pattinson, before becoming the Green Goblin in “The Amazing Spider-Man 2.” Yes, it seems his star is about to rise that little bit further.

Seduced And Abandoned

Summary: Alec Baldwin and filmmaker James Toback are on a mission: to remake Bernardo Bertolucci’s legendary 1972 film Last Tango in Paris by setting it in Iraq in the mid-2000s. Hobnobbing their way around Cannes, the wisecracking duo meet up with a who’s who of the film industry , including Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, Ryan Gosling and Bertolucci himself, as they try to find money, a script and a cast for their impossible idea.

Seduced and Abandoned is the delightful and utterly uncategorisable new pseudo-documentary from veteran director James Toback. A riff on the harsh economics of modern film turned unlikely buddy comedy, it’s a glimpse into the funny film business and a gleeful homage to a lost time when film was made for film’s sake.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 8th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: James Toback

Screenwriter: James Toback

Cast: Alec Baldwin (himself), Berenice Bejo (herself), Bernardo Bertolucci (himself), James Caan (himself),Neve Campbell (herself), Jessica Chastain (herself), Francis Ford Coppola (himself), Scott Foundas (himself), Ryan Gosling (himself), Charlotte Kirk (herself), Diane Kruger (herself), Todd McCarthy (himself), Roman Polanski (himself), Ben Schneider (himself), Thorsten Schumacher (himself), Martin Scorsese (himself), Jeremy Thomas (himself)

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification: MA15+

OUR SEDUCED AND ABANDONED REVIEWS & RATINGS:

David Griffiths:

Seduced And Abandoned is a hard documentary to explain. Not just for this lowly reviewer but you get a feeling that even the guys responsible for this film may have some trouble trying to pinpoint what the exact focus of this documentary actually is. This reeks as the kind of film that may have sounded like a good idea when a group of friends got together over a few drinks, but sadly when it reaches the big screen it becomes a meandering film that was well deserved of the walk outs it received at the screening I was at.

At the heart of Seduced And Abandoned are film director James Toback (Tyson, When Will I Be Loved) and actor Alec Baldwin (Blue Jasmine, TV’S 30 Rock) who have come up with the idea of remaking the classic Last Tango In Paris but setting it in Bush-era Iraq. It seems the original concept of the documentary was show them travelling to the Cannes Film Festival on a mission to receive backing for the film, but somewhere along the way the film got railroaded and ended up becoming a look at the history of the Film Festival itself and also how the likes of Ryan Gosling, Roman Polanski and Martin Scorsese got their starts in Hollywood.

One of the things that makes Seduced And Abandoned such a strange documentary is that seems that Baldwin and Toback really wanted this to be the kind of film that really celebrates cinema. Certainly that seems to be what is happening when they sit down and talk to Polanski, Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola and Bernardo Bertolucci, but during the film it actually begins to show the darkside of the industry – a side where people such as Neve Campbell and Oscar winner  Berenice Bejo find themselves as being described as ‘unmarketable.’

If Toback and Baldwin wanted Seduced And Abandoned to showcase themselves in the realm of a vanity piece then they certainly failed in their mission. Instead Toback comes across as a pushy director who believes that he deserves to be credited alongside the Scorseses and Coppolas of this world while Baldwin seems to be an actor who refuses to acknowledge that he is no longer a Hollywood leading man. At times this comes across as a poorly directed and cheaply edited wank fest, although it is kind of fun to watch as Baldwin gets put in his place by several producers and even an Australian film distributor.

Having said that though there are some highlights during Seduced And Abandoned. Hearing the likes of Ryan Gosling and Diane Kruger talking about what it means to be an actor in Hollywood these days is an interesting piece of cinema, as is hearing some of the legendary directors that we all look up to talking about their careers and what film-making means to them. Those interviews are absolutely priceless for young filmmakers out there.

Seduced And Abandoned ultimately fails at its major goals and is only made watchable by a couple of interviews that touch on some cinematic magic.

Stars(1)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(1)

IMDB Rating:  Seduced and Abandoned (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Seduced And Abandoned′: Nil.

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Recently the hosts of ‘The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show’ came up with their favourite actors here’s who is made their lists.

 

GREG KING’S LIST

Jodie Foster

  • Matt Damon
  • Michael Caine
  • Charles Bronson
  • John Wayne
  • Leonardo DiCaprio
  • Denzel Washington
  • Jack Nicholson
  • Michael Douglas
  • Sean Connery
  • Harrison Ford
  • Tom Cruise
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger
  • Robert De Niro
  • Tom Hanks
  • Jodie Foster

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Russell Crowe

  • Tom Cruise
  • Mickey Rourke
  • Liam Neeson
  • Edward Norton
  • Christian Bale
  • Jack Nicholson
  • Naomi Watts
  • Jean-Claude Van Damme
  • Al Pacino
  • Dustin Hoffman
  • Arnold Schwarznegger
  • Russell Crowe

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Leonardo DiCaprio

  • Russell Crowe
  • Bruce Willis
  • Woody Harrelson
  • Nicolas Cage
  • Emma Watson
  • Steve Carell
  • Michael Cera
  • Jesse Eisenberg
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Emma Stone
  • Ryan Gosling
  • Tom Cruise
  • Brit Marling
  • Ben Affleck
  • Matt Damon
  • Michelle Williams
  • Christian Bale
  • Heath Ledger
  • Stanley Tucci
  • Matthew McConaughey
  • Leonardo DiCaprio

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Humphrey Bogart

  • Will Ferrell
  • Larry David
  • John Cleese
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Leonardo DiCaprio
  • Bruno Ganz
  • Edward G. Robinson
  • John Hurt
  • Viggo Mortensen
  • Chips Rafferty
  • Anthony Hopkins
  • Sean Connery
  • James Gandolfini
  • Sidney Poitiner
  • Robert Duvall
  • Michael Caine
  • Patrick Stewart
  • Michael Fassbender
  • Samuel L. Jackson
  • John Meillion
  • Meryl Streep
  • Harvey Keitel
  • Morgan Freeman
  • Robert De Niro
  • Humphrey Bogart

Ryan Gosling - Place Beyond The Pines

Premiere Props just announced that they will be auctioning off over 1000 Hollywood props and costumes including a collection of personal items from Larry Hagman including his state of the art, solar paneled Airstream trailer (and dressing room) from DALLAS and his JR belt buckle; a John Lennon and Yoko Ono signed copy of their DOUBLE FANTASY album; a throne from THE TEN COMMANDMENTS; Ryan Gosling’s motorcycle from THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES; the monster truck from BRUNO signed by Sasha Baron Cohen; several props and costumes from Hugh Jackman and Jake Gyllenhaal’s from PRISONERS and stunt guns used by Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie in MR. & MRS. SMITH.

The auction will take place on Saturday, September 28, 2013 at Premiere Props’ headquarters in El Segundo, CA beginning at 11am PT, with a preview from 9-11am PT.    Fans can bid in-person, via phone or on-line.

Items include:

  • DALLAS – a collection of Larry Hagman’s personal items including his Airstream motorhome that was used as his dressing room; a JR belt buckle; a motorcycle helmet;  his Walk of Fame Display; his sunglasses; his project notes; a signed script and original artwork specifically made for him by Barton Lidice Benes.
  • THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES – Ryan Gosling’s CRF230 L Honda Road 230cc 2009 signed motorcycle
  • BRUNO – the over-sized 1989 Chevy R3500 Monster Truck custom made for the production that is signed on both front visors by Sasha Baron Cohen
  • PRISONERS – costumes and props from Hugh Jackman (Keller Dover), Jake Gyllenhaal (Detective Loki) and Maria Bello (Grace Dover)
  • THE TEN COMMANDMENTS – a throne and ceremonial chair from Cecil B DeMille’s epic film.  The Royal Empire throne is crafted in exquisite gold tinged metals and rare woods with inlaid hand carved hieroglyphs and was used by Anne Baxter (Princess Nefretiri) for two of the most iconic scenes from the film – the first iwhen Charlton Heston (Moses) returns from his heroic battle and then again when he is sentenced to death. The ceremonial chair is ivory inlaid and was prominently displayed when Moses discovers that Nina Foch (Bithiah), who found him as a baby in a basket in the rushes of the Nile is not his real mother.
  • MR. & MRS. SMITH – a set of stunt guns used by both Brad Pitt (John Smith) and Angelina Jolie (Jane Smith)
  • DOUBLE FANTASY – an album in mint condition signed by both John Lennon and Yoko Ono
  • MARILYN MONROE – an original 1952 Golden Dreams Marilyn Monroe Calendar and Tray circa 1955
  • SHERLOCK HOLMES – Basil Rathbone’s (Sherlock Holmes) Deerslayer cap and Nigel Bruce’s (Dr. Watson) black tie
  • E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL – original shooting script with all notes from script supervisor Ester Vivante’s
  • I LOVE LUCY – one of the original Chinese porcelain figurines (circa 1953) that graced the mantel of Lucy and Ricky’s fireplace
  • MISSION IMPOSSIBLE III – Tom Cruise’s stunt Desert Eagle Mark XIX gun
  • ARTIE SHAW – the legendary band leader’s famous Buffet Clarinet that he used on tour, in concerts and for many of his classic recordings that was then given to comedian Phil Silvers (one of his best friends) who then used it in his act
  • THE BIRDCAGE – Robin William’s (Armand Goldman) dress shirt and Hank Azaria’s (Agador) suit
  • 20,000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA – original detailed notebook and storyboards, plus a framed poster
  • DISNEYLAND – original and rare architectural drawings of Disneyland’s Main Street drawn by Earle G. Kaltenbach
  • MORTAL KOMBAT – fiery Jaguar head featured in the battle between Kano and Sub-Zero
  • TANK GIRL – Lori Petty’s (Tank Girl) screen worn goggles and custom Ruger weapon
  • STAR TREK – from the desk of Gene Roddenberry, an original typed letter on official STAR TREK stationary dated March 7, 1069 and addressed to reporter Charles Park/Santa Monica Outlook.

“As with all of our Hollywood Extravaganza auctions, we always work to include a wide variety of items so that all fans of Hollywood are able to own a little bit of entertainment history,” says Dan Levin, Vice President of Premiere Props.  “We definitely have something for everyone with items from Brad Pitt, Ryan Gosling and Hugh Jackman to Larry Hagman, STAR TREK and I LOVE LUCY.”

Fans can starting bidding now, placing bids online at http://www.icollector.com/ and http://www.liveauctioneers.com or calling to set up phone bidding with a Premiere Props representative. Collectors can place proxy bids until the Hollywood Extravaganza X Auction goes LIVE at 11am PT on Saturday, September 28.

For more information, please visit http://www.premiereprops.com or http://www.hollywoodliveauctions.com or call (310) 322-PROP / (888) 761-PROP.

The Good The Bad The UglyIn Episode 38 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Dave, Nick and Greg took at look at what they feel are the best acting performances in films made after the year 2000.

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Joaquin Phoenix

Viggo Mortensen – ‘A Dangerous Method

Christoph Waltz – ‘Inglorious Basterds

Kirsten Dunst – ‘Melancholia

Charlotte Gainsbourg – ‘Melancholia’

Russell Crowe – ‘A Beautiful Mind’

Tom Hardy – ‘Bronson’

Javier Bardem – ‘No Country For Old Men’

Will Ferrell – ‘Zoolander’

George Clooney – ‘The American’

Robert Downey Jnr – ‘Iron Man’

Daniel Day Lewis – ‘There Will Be Blood’, ‘Lincoln’

Paul Giamatti – ‘Sideways’

Anna Paquin – ‘Margaret’

Michael Fassbender – ‘Shame’, ‘X-Men: First Class’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Naomi Watts – ‘Mullholland Drive’

Joaquin Phoenix – ‘The Master’

 

GREG KING’S LIST

Heath Ledger

Matthew McConaughey – ‘Mud’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Anne Hathaway – “Les Miserables’

Sean Penn – ‘Mystic River’

Daniel Day Lewis – ‘Lincoln’

Christoph Waltz – ‘Inglorious Basterds’, ‘Django Unchained’

Carey Mulligan – ‘Shame’

Joseph Gordon-Levitt – ‘Mysterious Skin’, ’50/50′

Ryan Gosling – ‘Blue Valentine’, ‘The Place Beyond The Pines’, ‘Drive’

Matt Damon – ‘The Bourne Franchise’, ‘Promised Land’

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Leonardo DiCaprio

Joaquin Phoenix – ‘The Master’

Michael Shannon – ‘Take Shelter’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Anne Hathaway – ‘Rachel Getting Married’

Mickey Rourke – ‘The Wrestler’

Forrest Whitaker – ‘The Last King Of Scotland’

Alan Rickman – ‘Harry Potter Franchise’

Emma Stone – ‘Easy A’

Noomi Rapace – ‘The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo’

Joseph Gordon-Levitt – ‘Mysterious Skin’, ‘Brick’

Hugo Weaving – ‘Last Ride’

Ellen Page – ‘Juno’

Christoph Waltz – ‘Django Unchained’

Leonardo DiCaprio – ‘Shutter Island’, ‘Django Unchained’, ‘The Departed’

Michelle Williams – ‘Wendy & Lucy’, ‘Blue Valentine’

Kate Winslet – ‘Little Children’, ‘The Reader’

Penelope Cruz – ‘Vicky Cristina Barcelona’

Sam Rockwell – ‘Moon’

Jessie Eisenberg – ‘The Social Network’

Justin Timberlake – ‘The Social Network’

Nicolas Cage – ‘Lord Of War’

George Clooney – ‘The Descendants’

Michael Fassbender – ‘Shame’

Jennifer Lawrence – ‘Winter’s Bone’

Matthew McConaughey – ‘Mud’

Ryan Gosling – ‘Drive’

Robert Pattinson – ‘Remember Me’

Tom Holland – ‘The Impossible’

Naomi Watts – ‘The Impossible’