Tagged: Sally Hawkins

Godzilla

Summary: The world’s most famous monster is pitted against malevolent creatures who, bolstered by humanity’s scientific arrogance, threaten our very existence.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, Japan

Director: Gareth Edwards

Screenwriter: Max Borenstein, Dave Callaham (story)

Cast: CJ Adams (Young Ford), Juliette Binoche (Sandra Brody), Carson Bolde (Sam Brody), Garry Chalk (Stan Walsh), Bryan Cranston (Joe Brody), Jake Cunanan (Akio), James D. Dever (Captain Freeman), Catherine Lough Haggquist (PO #1 Martinez), Sally Hawkins (Vivienne Graham), Richard T. Jones (Captain Russell Hampton), Hiro Kanagawa (Hayato), Eric Keenleyside (Boyd), Anthony Konechny (Thach), Brian Markinson (Whelan), Gardiner Millar (Fitzgerald), Elizabeth Olsen (Elle Brody), Ty Olsson (Jainway), Victor Rasuk (Sergeant Tre Morales), Patrick Sabongui (Lieutenant Commander Marcus Waltz), Al Sapienza (Huddleston), David Strathairn (Admiral William Stenz), Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Ford Brody), Ken Watanabe (Dr. Ichiro Serizawa), Ken Yamamura (Takashi)

Runtime: 123 mins

Classification: M

OUR GODZILLA REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s Godzilla review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #79

Stars(3)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Godzilla review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #79

Stars(3)

David Griffiths:

Fans of Godzilla films want and deserve a good Godzilla film, after all the poor suffering souls have nothing but a bad taste in their mouth after the 1998 Matthew Broderick led disaster. Well now comes the 2014 update and on the surface it seems that in a rare oddity Hollywood has finally picked the right director to be at the helm of a major project. Anyone that can remember just how good Monsters was will attest to the fact that Gareth Edwards knows how to make a damn fine ‘monster flick.’

This time around we find Joe Brody (Bryan Cranston – Get A Job, Cold Comes The Night) alarmed at the seismic activity going on around the Japanese nuclear power plant where he works. To his surprise nobody seems to take him seriously and the result is a catastrophe that results in the death of many other workers including his wife.

Flash-forward to fifteen years later and Joe’s son Ford (Aaron Taylor-Johnson – Kick-Ass 2, Anna Karenina) is now a bomb expert in the military. He is also married to emergency room nurse, Elle (Elizabeth Olsen – Oldboy, In Secret) and has a young son that his military service takes him away from far to often. It is therefore understandable that he is frustrated when on a rare time at home he receives a call from Japanese authorities informing him that Joe has been arrested entering into a quarantined zone.

After bailing his father out Ford learns that his father believes that the authorities are keeping something secret inside the ‘zone’ and he wants to get inside to find his old data and to see what is going on. Reluctantly Ford follows his father and soon learns that experts, including Vivienne Graham (Sally Hawkins – The Double, Blue Jasmine) and Dr. Ichiro Serizawa (Ken Watanabe – Unforgiven, Inception) have been keeping a very large secret that is about to unleash itself onto the world.

It is easy to see Edwards’ handy work all over Godzilla. His monster sequences are well worth the price of admission, especially the ‘monster fights’ and at times he isn’t afraid to pull the focus away from these battles to show what the humans such as Ford are doing at that time. However while these sequences do look impressive as a whole Godzilla is held back from becoming a great film because of several reasons.

One of the major flaws of Godzilla is the characterisation. While you hardly go into a ‘monster flick’ expecting an epic back story for each character it is disappointing to find that a lot of the characters here in Godzilla are dangerously one dimensional. For example Dr. Serizawa is one of the more interesting characters although very little is learnt about him, then there is the massive under use of Elle, which results in the crime of seeing an award winning actress like Elizabeth Olsen become little more than scenery as she simple watches monsters go by with her mouth open like a Laughing Clown. The lack of characterization causes a problem later on in the film when the audience begins to realise that they really don’t care whether some characters survive the slaughter or not.

Of course though one of the most important things for a film like Godzilla however is what do the monsters actually look? Well Godzilla himself looks fine, Edwards’ team has actually done a pretty good throw back to the Godzilla of old. The same however cannot be said for the other Kaiju monsters that appear in the film, call me an old-fogey but somehow they seem just a little bit too metallic and robotic like for me. Their look makes them look very fake while on the other hand Godzilla’s natural look makes it almost believable that such creatures do live somewhere out there under the sea.

The decent storyline however does allow some of the actors to show their worth though. Bryan Cranston is given some moments to show his dramatic range, a welcome relief after the teaser footage they showed us a couple of months ago made it look like he might have been going for a comedic portrayal of his character, while Aaron Taylor-Johnson pulls on a serious face and actually shows that he may have what it takes to become an action hero in the future. As previously mentioned though some of the cast – especially Elizabeth Olsen and Ken Watanabe – are completely wasted in their one dimensional roles.

Godzilla is certainly far from a bad film. The good storyline and decent action sequences make it a worthy watch and Gareth Edwards should be congratulated for that, but sadly some elements of the script will still leave some serious film lovers wanting more.

 

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Godzilla (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Godzilla′: Nil

Trailer:

Golden Globe Awards

The 2014 Golden Globe Award nominations are in, here they are:

 

Best Actor In A Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Matt Damon (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Chiwetel Ejiofor (Dancing On The Edge)
  • Idris Elba (Luther)
  • Al Pacino (Phil Spector)
  • Michael Douglas (Behind The Candelabra)

 

Best Actor In A Motion Picture, Drama

  • Chiwetel Ejiorfor (12 Years A Slave)
  • Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips)
  • Robert Redford (All Is Lost)
  • Idris Elba (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)

 

Best Actor In A Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

  • Bruce Dern (Nebraska)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (The Wolf Of Wall Street)
  • Christian Bale (American Hustle)
  • Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (Her)

 

Best Actor In A TV Series, Comedy

  • Jason Bateman (Arrested Development)
  • Don Cheadle (House Of Lies)
  • Michael J. Fox (The Michael J. Fox Show)
  • Jim Parsons (The Big Bang Theory)
  • Andy Samberg (Brooklyn Nine-Nine)

 

Best Actor In A TV Series, Drama

  • Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
  • Michael Sheen (Masters Of Sex)
  • Kevin Spacey (House Of Cards)
  • James Spader (The Black List)
  • Liev Schreiber (Ray Donovan)

 

Best Actress In A Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Helena Bonham Carter (Burton And Taylor)
  • Rebecca Ferguson (White Queen)
  • Jessica Lange (American Horror Story:Coven)
  • Helen Mirren (Phil Spector)
  • Elisabeth Moss (Top Of The Lake)

 

Best Actress In A Motion Picture, Drama

  • Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
  • Sandra Bullock (Gravity)
  • Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks)
  • Judi Dench (Philomena)
  • Kate Winslet (Labor Day)

 

Best Actress In A Motion Picture, Musical Or Comedy

  • Meryl Streep (August: Osage County)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Enough Said)
  • Amy Adams (American Hustle)
  • Julie Delpy (Before Midnight)
  • Greta Gerwig (Frances Ha)

 

Best Actress In A TV Series, Comedy

  • Zooey Deschanel (New Girl)
  • Lena Dunham (Girls)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Veep)
  • Amy Poehler (Parks And Recreation)
  • Edie Falco (Nurse Jackie)

 

Best Actress In A TV Series, Drama

  • Julianna Margulies (The Good Wife)
  • Kerry Washington (Scandal)
  • Tatiana Maslany (Orphan Black)
  • Robin Wright (House Of Cards)
  • Taylor Schilling (Orange Is The New Black)

 

Best Animated Feature Film

  • Frozen
  • The Croods
  • Despicable Me 2

 

Best Director – Motion Picture

  • Alfonso Cuaron (Gravity)
  • Steve McQueen (12 Years A Slave)
  • David O. Russell (American Hustle)
  • Paul Greengrass (Captain Phillips)
  • Alexander Payne (Nebraska)

 

Best Foreign Language Film

  • Blue Is The Warmest Color
  • The Past
  • The Hunt
  • The Wind Rises
  • The Great Beauty

 

Best Motion Picture, Drama

  • 12 Years A Slave
  • Gravity
  • Captain Phillips
  • Rush
  • Philomena

 

Best Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical

  • Nebraska
  • American Hustle
  • The Wolf Of Wall Street
  • Inside Llewyn Davis
  • Her

 

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

  • Steven Price (Gravity)
  • John Williams (The Book Thief)
  • Hans Zimmer (12 Years A Slave)
  • Alex Ebert (All Is Lost)
  • Alex Heffes (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)

 

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

  • Atlas (The Hunger Games: Catching Fire)
  • Let It Go (Frozen)
  • Ordinary Love (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)
  • Please Mr. Kennedy (Inside Llewyn Davis)
  • Sweeter Than Fiction (One Chance)

 

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

  • John Ridley (12 Years A Slave)
  • Bob Nelson (Nebraska)
  • Eric Warren Singer & David O. Russell (American Hustle)
  • Jeff Pope (Philomena)
  • Spike Jonze (Her)

 

Best Supporting Actor In A Motion Picture

  • Michael Fassbender (12 Years A Slave)
  • Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Bradley Cooper (American Hustle)
  • Daniel Bruhl (Rush)
  • Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips)

 

Best Supporting Actor In A Series, Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Rob Lowe (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Josh Charles (The Good Wife)
  • Aaron Paul (Breaking Bad)
  • Corey Stoll (House Of Cards)
  • Jon Voight (Ray Donovan)

 

Best Supporting Actress In A Motion Picture

  • Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years A Slave)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle)
  • Julia Roberts (August: Osage County)
  • June Squibb (Nebraska)
  • Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine)

 

Best Supporting Actress In A Series, Mini-Series Or TV Movie

  • Hayden Panettiere (Nashville)
  • Jacqueline Bisset (Dancing On The Edge)
  • Janet McTeer (White Queen)
  • Monica Potter (Parenthood)
  • Sofia Vergara (Modern Family)

 

Best TV Movie or Mini-Series

  • American Horror Story: Coven
  • Behind The Candelabra
  • Dancing On The Edge
  • Top Of The Lake
  • White Queen

 

Best TV Series, Comedy

  • The Big Bang Theory
  • Modern Family
  • Girls
  • Brooklyn 99
  • Parks And Recreation

 

Best TV Series, Drama

  • Breaking Bad
  • Downtown Abbey
  • House Of Cards
  • Masters Of Sex
  • The Good Wife

Blue Jasmine

Summary: After everything in her life falls to pieces, including her marriage to wealthy businessman Hal (Alec Baldwin), elegant New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) moves into her sister Ginger’s modest apartment in San Francisco to try to pull herself back together again.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 12th September, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Woody Allen

Screenwriter: Woody Allen

Cast: Alec Baldwin (Hal), Tammy Blanchard (Jane), Cate Blanchett (Jasmine), Louis C.K. (Al), Bobby Cannavale (Chili), Max Casella (Eddie), Andrew Dice Clay (Augie), Alden Ehrenreich (Danny), Ali Fedotowsky (Melanie), Sally Hawkins (Ginger), Emily Hsu (Amy), Daniel Jenks (Matthew), Tom Kemp (Nat), Andrew Long (Ed), Annie McNamara (Nora), Max Rutherford (Johnny), Peter Sarsgaard (Dwight), Carl Schreiber (Tristan), Michael Stuhlbarg (Dr. Flicker), Charlie Tahan (Young Danny), Kathy Tong (Raylene)

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification:M

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘BLUE JASMINE’:

Greg King: Stars(4)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Blue Jasmine’ that is available on www.filmreviews.com.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(4)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Blue Jasmine’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 49

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  Blue Jasmine (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Blue Jasmine′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 49 for our in-depth review of ‘Blue Jasmine.’

Trailer:

Great Expectations
Summary: Adapted from the classic Charles Dickens novel by Dave Nicholls (One Day) and directed by Mike Newell (Four Weddings and a Funeral) is Great Expectations. The story of a humble orphan, Pip (Jeremy Irvine, War Horse), who suddenly becomes a gentleman with the help of an unknown benefactor.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 7th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA/UK

Director: Mike Newell

Screenwriter: David Nicholls, Charles Dickens (book)

Cast: Matt Abercromby (Finch), Olly Alexander (Herbert Pocket), Helena Barlow (Young Estella), Ewen Bremner (Wemmick), Nellie Burroughes (Mrs. Compeyson), Charlie Callaghan (Young Herbert Pocket), Helena Bonham Carter (Miss Havisham), Bebe Cave (Young Biddy), Jessie Cave (Biddy), Robbie Coltrane (Mr. Jaggers), William Ellis (Compeyson), Ralph Fiennes (Magwitch), Jason Flemyng (Joe Gargery), Tim Freeman (Mr. Wopsle), Holliday Grainger (Estella), Sally Hawkins (Mrs. Joe), Jeremy Irvine (Pip), Toby Irvine (Young Pip), Richard James (Cousin Raymond), Joe Jameson (Startop), Ben Lloyd-Hughes (Bentley Drummle), Kate Lock (Camilla Pocket), Tom Machell (Finch), Tamzin Outhwaite (Molly), Sophie Rundle (Clara), David Walliams (Uncle Pumblechook), Daniel Weyman (Arthur Havisham), Charles L. Whitworth (Mrs. Raymond)

Runtime: 129 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Great Expectations’ Review: 

It’s funny how many films get made that it seems don’t really need to have been made. Take a look at the new adaption of ‘Great Expectations’, why did director Mike Newell (‘Prince Of Persia: The Sands Of Time’, ‘Love In The Time Of Cholera’) really have to make another modern version. After all the original 1946 version was a cinematic masterpiece and there has already been a modern remake, one that starred Ethan Hawke and Gwenyth Paltrow and surfaced in 1998.

Still Newell got the funding to once again bring Charles Dickens’ work to the big screen and while he doesn’t exactly do anything new with his version if you have never seen the story before you will still marvel at its twists and turns.

For those who haven’t seen the previous adaptations of Charles Dickens classic novel, the film is about a young boy named Pip (Toby Irvine – newcomer/Jeremy Irvine – ‘Now Is Good’, ‘War Horse) who out of the kindness of his heart one day helps an escaped convict called Magwitch (Ralph Fiennes – ‘Skyfall’, ‘Wrath Of The Titans’). While Pip tries to keep the news from his guardian, Joe (Jason Flemyng – ‘Black Mirror’, ‘I Give It A Year’) the news does eventually leak out and Magwitch is returned to prison.

Pip’s life then dramatically changes when he is the young boy that is selected by the extremely wealthy (but also very strange) Miss Havisham (Helena Bonham Carter – ‘Les Miserables’, ‘Dark Shadows’) to play with Estella (Helena Barlow – ‘Horrid Henry: The Movie’, ‘Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part 2’/Holliday Grainger – ‘Anna Karenina’, ‘Bel Ami’) while she watches. Pip quickly develops a crush on Estella and is heart broken when he is sent away from the mansion he comes to love.

When Pip is older his life again changes when a lawyer, Mr Jaggers (Robbie Coltrane – ‘Brave’, TV’S ‘The Comic Strip Presents…’) turns up and tells Pip that he has been left a decent sum of people. Pip chooses to leave Joe and moves to London where he joins the elite, crosses paths with Estella again  all while uncovering more and more secrets every single day.

Maybe the fact that Newell doesn’t do anything to change the story at all is a good thing, after all remember the mess of the modern version of ‘Jane Eyre’ that surfaced recently, proof that modern remakes can really wreck even a classic tale. While Newell’s version of ‘Great Expectations’ does nothing new at least it once again proves the skills that Dickens had as a writer.

One thing that does work with this film is the acting. While Holliday Grainger and Jeremy Irvine live up to their ‘exciting new talent’ tags the usual suspects like Robbie Coltrane and Ralph Fiennes again deliver faultless performances. However the star here is Helena Bonham Carter who really makes the character of Miss Havisham warped and mysterious… this is clearly one of Carter’s best performances to date.

If you’ve seen the other versions of ‘Great Expectations’ than you may want to save your money and sit this one out, but if you’re a newbie to the story then this is a great place to start.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Great Expectations′: Check Episode #23 (available 8th March) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Great Expectations’. Please also check Dave Griffiths’s review of ‘Great Expectations’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating:Great Expectations (2012) on IMDb