Tagged: Shane Jacobson

 

Summary: THAT’S NOT MY DOG is a joyous comedy that celebrates our love of joke telling. The film centers around the lovable Shane Jacobson (playing himself) who is throwing a party. Invited are the funniest people Shane knows comprising of Australia’s biggest stars along with several Australian music legends playing their biggest hits live, right throughout the party. The invite that goes out is clear. Don’t bring meat. We’ll provide the beer. Just come armed with nothing but the funniest jokes you’ve ever heard. Shane will take care of the rest. It’ll be a night of great friends telling the world’s funniest jokes over a beer and BBQ.

Year: 2018

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th March 2018

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Dean Murphy

Screenwriter: Various

Cast: Bec Asha (herself), Michala Banas (herself), Adam Brand (himself), Rob Carlton (himself), Ross Daniels (himself), Dave Eastgate (himself), Stewart Faichney (himself), Paul Fenech (himself), Tim Ferguson (himself), Marty Fields (himself), John Foreman (himself), Stephan Hall (himself), Paul Hogan (himself), Ronald Jacobson (himself), Shane Jacobson (himself), Jimeoin (himself), Joe Camilleri & The Black Sorrows (themselves), Ed Kavalee (himself), Dan Kelly (himself), Khaled Khalafella (himself), Bev Killick (herself), Hung Le (himself), Anthony ‘Lehmo’ Lehmann (himself), Nathaniel Antonio Lloyd (himself), Lulu McClathy (herself), The Meltdown (themselves), Genevieve Morris (herself), Russell Morris (himself), Spud Murphy (himself), Fiona O’Loughlin (herself), Emily Taheny (herself), Steve Vizard (himself), Christie Whelan (herself)

Runtime: TBA

Classification: M

 

OUR THAT’S NOT MY DOG REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

 

When it comes to comedy specials things are normally pretty straight forward – it’s either one comedian doing stand-up for the entire special or a producer randomly selects the current ‘it’ comedian to host a special where they simply just stand in front of a camera and ‘introduce’ a myriad of comedians to perform their own stand-up routine. That’s where That’s Not My Dog comes into its own.

Aussie comedy great Shane Jacobson (The Bourne Legacy, The Dressmaker) came up with an absolute gem of an idea when he rang his great mate producer/director Dean Murphy (Charlie &Boots, Strange Bedfellows) and said that he wanted to bring back the art of telling a good old-fashioned joke. Of course the creative mind of Jacobson wouldn’t settle for just the plain old comedy special, and in his brilliance he comes up with the wonderful idea of inviting 30 of his funniest mates to come to a BBQ – eat great food, have some brilliant live music played for them while they also stand around telling some of the funniest jokes that you are ever likely to hear.

The result is a brilliant film that turns out to be a celebration of Australian comedy like we have never seen before. The audience sits laughing themselves into hysterics as comedy greats like Paul Hogan (Crocodile Dundee, Strange Bedfellows) and Steve Vizard (Full Frontal, The Wrong Girl) join forces with comedians of today, like Jimeon (The Craic, The Extra) and Lehmo (Any Questions For Ben, Utopia) and tell three of the funniest jokes that they know. Then of course there are also the hidden talents of those such as Michaela Banas (Nowhere Boys, Always Greener) who steals the show with not only her jokes but also with her ability to tell them.

The concept of the jokes being told at a BBQ just adds to the film with the background noise, and live music being provided by the likes of Dan Kelly, The Black Sorrows and Adam Brand just adding even more atmosphere to the film. What works best though with the film is of course the jokes and luckily for Jacobson his cast came along armed with some of the best jokes that you are ever likely to hear. Aside from Michaela Banas the other star here who really steals the show is the great Marty Fields (Ghost Rider, Blue Heelers) who just delivers comedy gem after comedy gem.

That’s Not My Dog is a brilliant comedic idea that results in pure comedy gold. Shane Jacobson needs to be applauded for taking a stance and re-introducing the lost of art of joke telling to Australians and we should all support him by not only going to see the film but by turning up to work on Monday and saying “hey guys, you should hear this joke I heard on the weekend.”

 

 

 

Greg King’s Review:

The affable Shane Jacobson (whose previous film The BBQ was a massive disappointment and a laboured and unfunny comedy that failed to fire up) threw a massive party at his father’s property in Clarkeville, in regional Victoria. He invited along thirty of Australia’s top comics to share in the joy of joke telling and laughter. He provided all the meat and beer, all the guests had to provide was their funniest jokes. Guests included Paul Hogan, Jimeoin, Marty Fields, Stephen Hall, Fiona O’Loughlin and Tim Ferguson, amongst many others.

The whole night was captured on film by filmmaker Dean Murphy, who directed both Jacobson and Hogan in the road comedy Charlie And Boots. Murphy adopts a free-flowing style here as the camera roams around the party, recording the jokes and the camaraderie. Gags fly thick and fast throughout the relatively brisk 89-minute running time. Each of the guests are given their moment to shine, but some seem to get more screen time than others. Some of the jokes may be familiar, but the veteran comics also put a fresh spin on the gags. And the musical accompaniment to the evening was provided by a bevy of musical acts, including The Black Sorrows, Russell Morris, Adam Brand and Dan Kelly.

That’s Not My Dog is like spending an informal evening in the company of these comics as they enjoy each other’s company and eavesdropping on their funny stories in a somewhat relaxed setting. Everyone seemed to be having a ball. Jacobson’s father Ron comes across as a pretty good story teller himself, but his energy seems to be flagging by the end of the night. The whole thing was filmed over one long night, shot by cinematographer Robert Lanser (who shot Murphy’s Charlie And Boots). Then Murphy and his editor Robert Mond patiently worked through the footage to tighten up the material and remove jokes that were repetitious or potentially too crude or offensive.

One of the big distractions in the film is the blatant product placement, although this is probably how Jacobson and Murphy gained the funding for this low budget film and extravagant evening.

Depending on personal taste though some of the humour will be hit or miss. The title itself comes from the punch line to a classic joke that was used in a Pink Panther movie. For me the highlights were Marty Fields and his stream on clever and witty one-liners and a great joke about a woman joining the CIA.

And while a generally entertaining film, That’s Not My Dog is not great cinema. However, it will be best enjoyed in the cinema where audiences can share the experience and the humour with others, as laughter is often infectious. But it will also do well when released on DVD, where you can re-watch and listen to your favourite jokes over again.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): 

 

 

IMDB Rating: That's Not My Dog! (2018) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Girl’s Trip Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

DAVID GRIFFITHS

 

Dave Griffiths

Dave Griffiths has worked as a journalist for over twenty years now -covering topics including film, television, music, travel and sport (with a main focus on AFL Football).

That time has seen him host the popular X-Wired television program for seven seasons as well as write for various magazines such as Buzz Magazine, Heavy Mag, Stage Whispers, The Banner and Eternity..

He has even branched out into writing online for Subculture Entertainment, Media Search and The Book The Film The T-Shirt. He also worked as the online editor for Entertainment 360 for three years.

Dave’s radio work has seen him work on various radio stations including 3RPP, Triple R and Light FM. He is currently the resident film reviewer on Talking Lifestyle (Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane) and can be heard reviewing what is new at cinemas and on DVD each week on Thursdays at 3pm with Ed Phillips. He is also the co-host of Melbourne’s 94.1FM’s breakfast show ‘The Motley Crew’ and he can sometimes be heard on J-Air’s ‘First On Film’. David is also the co-host of two popular podcasts – ‘The Good, The Bad, The Ugly Film Show,’ and ‘The Popcorn Conspiracy’

As far as Film Reviewing goes David is an elected committee member of AFCA (Australian Film Critics Association and a member of IPRESCI (International Federation of Film Critics)/FIPRESCI (Fédération Internationale de la Presse Cinématographique).

He has also served as a jury member for a number of international film festivals and is considered an expert on cult cinema, horror movies and Australian films.

Dave is also a keen screenwriter and is currently working on a new comic book series.

 

Currently David Griffiths has 38 Film Reviews on Subculture Entertainment

 

 

Currently David Griffiths has 39 Film Interviews on Subculture Entertainment

 

Currently David Griffiths has 10 Music Reviews on Subculture Entertainment

 

Currently David Griffiths has 9 Music Interviews on Subculture Entertainment

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at  new release films ‘Oddball,’ ‘How To Change The World,’ ‘Everest,‘ and Blinky Bill The Movie.’ This episode also contains interviews with Jake Gyllenhaal, Jason Clarke, Shane Jacobson, Robert Leeshock (Star Leaf) and Cerise Howard (Czech Slovak Film Festival).

Also make sure you are listening this week as the boys announce a very special partnership that The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show has started with DC Comics and Warner Home Video. We kick off this brand new partnership by giving you the chance to win a copy of Arrow Season 3 on DVD or Blu-Ray.

To listen to the show or can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Oddball

Summary: Middle Island was once a flourishing penguin population but sadly over the years the numbers have dropped from a few thousand down to around ten due to the fact that foxes have worked out how to get to the Island. This has now caused problems for Emily Marsh (Sarah Snook), Jack Jones (Richard Davies) and Zoe (Tegan Higginbotham) who have been told they will lose their jobs if the Island is no longer considered a sanctuary.

As the nearby town of Warrnambool works hard at becoming a tourist destination by having the local council including Mayor Lake (Deborah Mailman) working with an advisor named Bradley Slater (Alan Tudyk) to come up with new tourism ideas. But when Bradley’s idea means the future of Middle Island is doomed a local chicken farmer named Swampy Marsh (Shane Jacobson) and his granddaughter, Olivia (Coco Jack Gillies) decides it is up to them and a mischievous dog called Oddball to come up with a way to fix everything.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 17th September 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Stuart McDonald

Screenwriter: Peter Ivan

Cast: Terry Camilleri (Judge Burns), Richard Davies (Jack Jones), Coco Jack Gillies (Olivia), Tegan Higginbotham (Zoe),  Shane Jacobson (Swampy), Dave Lawson (Sergeant Gosch), Deborah Mailman (Mayor Lake), Sarah Snook (Emily Marsh), Alan Tudyk (Bradley Slater), Frank Woodley (Dog Catcher)

Runtime: 95 mins

Classification: G

 

OUR ODDBALL REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

This has been the year when the Australian film industry has hit back with vengenance. Amongst the good drama films that have surfaced Aussie cult cinema has led the way around the world with films like Kill Me Three Times and Wrymwood making the charts in America while Mad Max: Fury Road seemed to thrill action film lovers as well. Of course one of the biggest Australian films over the past few years has been Red Dog – a family film that surprised everybody. Not surprisingly many Aussie filmmakers thought they had just discovered the best way to make people watch your film and that was to create a family friendly film about dog. Several projects fitting that description have fallen by the wayside but now Oddball manages to make its way to the big screen.

Yes I’ve made the clichéd comparison between Oddball and Red Dog so now let’s take a look at whether or not the film is actually any good. The answer to that question is a solid yes because director Stuart McDonald (who over recent years has worked on all of Chris Lilley’s projects) and screenwriter Peter Ivan have been brave enough to make Oddball a little bit different to the thousands of dog movies over the years. When the opening to Oddball boasts that this is a fairy tale they aren’t joking. Yes this is a true story that saw the people of Warrnambool embrace a Maremma dog but together these talented filmmakers have told the story in a fairy tale style which incorporates a smart script with a little bit of pantomime acting, especially from comedian Frank Woodley who plays the mean dog catcher. In the past this style of filmmaking has led to some pretty woeful Australian films, I’m looking at you Welcome To Woop Woop, but here it makes a refreshing difference and makes Oddball the kind of film that could be enjoyed by the whole family.

Ironically when watching Oddball the old fart joke and over the top dog chase does have a bit of a feel of a Paul Jennings story and sure enough a quick check of Peter Ivan’s bio shows that he was one of the writer’s on Two Twisted, a show based on Jenning’s work. Somehow this script manages to incorporate that kind of humor with a dramatic storyline revolving around how greed can impeach on nature and also explores the fractured relationship between father and daughter when it comes to things between Swampy and Emily. Yes Ivan and McDonald together have somehow created a film that will actually have you laughing one moment and tearing up the next.

The key to this film working as well as it does though is through it’s casting. Shane Jacobson does a great job in the lead role of Swampy. He made the character of Kenny famous all those years ago and while his comedic talent is held back a little here he now has also made Swampy a much loved Australian character. He is well supported by Alan Tudyk who plays the pushy American but the scenes here are stolen by Sarah Snook who once again shows why she is an Australian actress on the rise and young Coco Jack Gillies who here shows the world that she is a child actress with a huge future ahead of her.

Oddball is a genuine treat. It is a film that has a strong conservational message but doesn’t get bogged down in preaching to its audience. A great script that manages to mix humor and drama together well without becoming to adult for children is a rarity these days, but here it works well and allows it’s talented cast to really show there skills. Different but smart, cute but dramatic Oddball will surprise more than a few people who take the time to watch the film.

 

 

 

Stars(3.5)

 

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Oddball review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Oddball (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Oddball reviews:Oddball with be reviewed in an upcoming episode of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show.

Trailer:

Summary:An expansion of the universe from Robert Ludlum s novels, centered on a new hero whose stakes have been triggered by the events of the previous three films.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 16th August, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 13th December, 2012

Country: United States

Director: Tony Gilroy

Screenwriter: Dan Gilroy, Tony Gilroy, Robert Ludlum (book)

Cast: Joan Allen (Pam Landy), John Arcilla (Joseph), Clayton J. Barber (Gene), Michael Berresse (Leonard), Dennis Boutsikaris (Terrence Ward), Sonnie Brown (Dr. Lieberburg), Michael Chernus (Arthur Ingram), Neil Brooks Cunningham (Dr. Han Hillcoat), Albert Finney (Dr. Albert Hirsch), Scott Glenn (Ezra Kramer), Tony Guida (Dr. Benezara), Adi Hanash (Outcome #1), Oscar Isaac (Outcome #3), Zeljko Ivanek (Dr. Donald Foite), Shane Jacobson (Mackie), Corey Johnson (Ray Wills), Stacy Keach (Retired Adm. Mark Turso USN), Jennifer Kim (Outcome #4), Page Leong (Mrs. Yun), Elizabeth Marvel (Dr. Connie Dowd), Donna Murphy (Dita Mandy), Edward Norton (Retired Col. Eric Byer, USAF), Michael Papajohn (Larry), Gita Reddy (Dr. Chandra), Jeremy Renner (Aaron Cross), Ali Reza (Dr. Talwar), Robert Christopher Riley (Outcome #6), Corey Stoll (Zev Vendel), David Strathairn (Noah Vosen), John Douglas Thompson (Lt. Gen. Paulsen), Rachel Weisz (Dr. Marta Shearing)

Runtime: 135 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Bourne Legacy’ Review:

It’s hard to fathom that a team could put together a film with the word Bourne in the title and not feature the character of Jason Bourne (made famous by Matt Damon), yet that is exactly what happens in The Bourne Legacy, a film that may not be as good as the others in the series but certainly holds its own.

This fourth film in the series follows Aaron Cross (Jeremy Renner – The Avengers, Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol) an Outcome Agent who is left on the run after Outcome is official closed down by Eric Byer (Edward Norton – Moonrise Kingdom, Stone) after all the trouble that Jason Bourne has caused for the Blackbriar and Touchstone projects.

Of course closing down doesn’t simply mean shutting down the programs it instead means that agents such as Aaron and #3 (Oscar Isaac – Revenge For Jolly!, For Greater Glory: The True Story Of Cristiada) are to be assignated. After surviving the initial attack Aaron goes on the run and decides to rescue Dr. Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz – Dream House, The Deep Blue Sea) the one person who he believes can answer all his questions.

While director/screenwriter Tony Gilroy (Duplicity, Michael Clayton) does come up with some interesting ways to get around having Jason Bourne in the film (and to his credit they do work) he also decides not to go to far away from the formula created by director Paul Greengrass in the last three Bourne movies. Certainly the flashy editing, roof top chase and massive car chase are there for all to see.

Gilroy however does take a massive step this time in the way he brings characterization to his characters. He has the advantage of Aaron knowing about his past to aid him (whereas Jason Bourne was suffering from amnesia), but the amount of work put into the character of Dr. Marta Shearing makes her an extremely interesting character that the audience can quickly warm to.

As a result Rachel Weisz laps up the role and puts in a stunning performance, so good is she in fact that she overshadows Renner who to his credit again shows that he is capable of pulling off some amazing action sequences but also has the ability to act his way through the more dramatic dialogue parts of the film. It is also good to see Aussie Shane Jabobson (Beaconsfield, Surviving Georgia) getting a chance to show off his skills on the world stage.

The Bourne Legacy may not be the best film of the series but thanks to a creative storyline it does work despite the fact Matt Damon (aka Jason Bourne) is nowhere to be seen.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of The Bourne Legacy:  http://www.helium.com/items/2366760-movie-reviews-the-bourne-legacy-2012.

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: The Bourne Legacy (2012) on IMDb