Tagged: Spike Jonze

Jason Lee

Actor Jason Lee is one of those performers who has really become known for two of his most iconic roles. Kids (and families) will know him as the long suffering Dave who has been stuck with the task of looking after the mischievous chipmunks in the “Alvin & The Chipmunks” franchise, while adults will know him as the atonement seeking Earl in the hit television comedy series “My Name Is Earl.”

Jason Michael Lee was born on the April 25, 1970 in Orange County (California) to parents, Greg and Linda Lee. He was raised in Huntington Beach and attended Ocean View High School. It was during that period that he begun working on the skills that would see him become a household name as a professional skateboarder.

By the time he turned 18, Lee was already a popular member of the skateboarding circuit and was mostly known for his signature move – the ‘360 flip.’ It was his skateboarding career that saw him begin his film career when in 1991 he appeared in director Spike Jonze’s short film “Video Days.” Soon, Jonze included Lee in a couple of his projects including a video clip with the band Sonic Youth and giving him his first acting role in feature film “Mi vida loca,” a film that Jonze also acted in.

1995 saw Jason Lee also begin another feature film relationship when he teamed up with cult favorite director Kevin Smith who cast him in the hit comedy “Mallrats” alongside Shannon Doherty and Ben Affleck. After “Mallrats,” Smith also cast Lee in his big hit “Chasing Amy” and over time also appeared in other Smith films including “Dogma,” “Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back,” “Jersey Girl,” “Cop Out” and “Clerks II.”

After the success of his roles in “Dogma” and “Chasing Amy” Lee soon found himself being cast in high profile films including “Enemy Of The State” (alongside Will Smith), “Almost Famous” and “Vanilla Sky” (with Tom Cruise).

In 2005, Jason Lee’s career really took off. First of all he was cast in the new comedy television show “My Name Is Earl,” which over the years saw him nominated for two Golden Globe awards. In the same year, Lee voiced a character in the animated short “Jack-Jack Attack” and this helped him discover a new talent. Soon, Lee was in high demand as a voice actor and after voicing a character in television series “American Dad” he soon found himself voicing characters in feature films such as “Monster House,” “Underdog” and “Noah” and the video games “Skate 3,” “Alvin & The Chipmunks” and “Disney Infinity.”

The success of “My Name Is Earle” soon saw Lee cast as the lovable loser Dave Seville in the “Alvin & The Chipmunks” franchise which has currently see Lee involved in all three films, while he is also set to star in the fourth installment due in cinemas in 2015.

Since “My Name Is Earl” wrapped production in 2009, Lee has also been involved in other television shows including “Memphis Beat,” “Up All Night” and “Raising Hope.”

Outside of his acting career, Lee still has a massive involvement in the skateboarding world. He is the co-founder and co-owner of “Stereo Skateboards” and “Stereo Sounds Clothing.” Lee is also involved in a number of charities including the Keep A Breast Foundation and also Tony Hawke’s Stand Up For Skateparks and the Tony Hawke Charitable Foundation.

When it comes to personal relationships Lee married actress and photographer Carmen Llywelyn in 1995, but the pair divorced in 2001 due to Lee’s commitment to Scientology.  Lee then became involved with actress Beth Riesgraf and before they split in 2007 that had a son who was named Pilot ‘Standard’ Inspektor. On July 1, 2008 Lee married actress Ceren Alkac. They are still married and together have two children – a daughter named Casper (born on Nov. 24, 2008) and a son named Sonny Lee (born on June 16, 2012).

Jason Lee may not have dreamed of being an actor when he was younger but today he has one of the most recognizable faces in America. The next few years will see Lee turn his back on the small screen for a while and instead be appearing on the big screen in “Behaving Badly” (with Selena Gomez and Dylan McDermott), the action drama “Tell” (with Alan Tudyk and Katee Sackhoff) and of course “Alvin & The Chipmunks 4.”

Jackass Presents Bad Grandpa

Summary: 86-year-old Irving Zisman is on a journey across America with the most unlikely companion: his 8 year-old grandson, Billy.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th November, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: 26th March, 2014

Country: USA

Director: Jeff Tremaine

Screenwriter: Fax Bahr (story), Spike Jonze (story), Johnny Knoxville, Adam Small (story), Jeff Tremaine

Cast: Georgina Cates (Kimmie), Greg Harris (Chuck), Spike Jonze (Gloria), Catherine Keener (Ellie), Johnny Knoxville (Irving Zisman), Jackson Nicoll (Billy)

Runtime: 92 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Nick Gardner: Stars(2)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #58

Adam Ross: Stars(3)

Please check Adam’s review of ‘Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #58

David Griffiths: 

Okay, so not everybody over the years is going to have enjoyed what the Jackass guys have delivered to cinema screens. That’s okay, everybody has their own likes and dislikes. Still, when you are approaching a film to review it, you have to take into consideration whether the film does what it sets out to do. With that in mind, it does make reviewing a film such as “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” a little easier.

While this certainly isn’t a film for the faint-hearted it does see the crew behind Jackass try something a little different to what they have done before. This time they mix up their stunts/hijinx with a narrative. It’s flimsy, but basically the film tells the story of 85 year old pensioner Irving Zisman (Johnny Knoxville – “The Last Stand,” “Movie 43”), who has just heard the news that his wife Ellie (Catherine Keener – “Captain Phillips,” “Can A Song Save Your Life”) has passed away.

Rather than allow the news to upset Irving decides that with her out of the way he can now live his life, however that thought is quickly extinguished when he also learns that his daughter Kimmie (Georgina Cates – “The Upshot,” TV’s “The Closer”) is going to jail for drug offenses and that he is going to have his drive his 8-year-old grandson Billy (Jackson Nicoll – “Fun Size,” “The Stand Up”) across country to his deadbeat father, Chuck (Greg Harris – “Wrong,” TV’s “The Cynical Life Of Harper Hall”).

The story is not strong and the screenplay is not great, yet “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” does more than its fair share to entertain. The story does draw in the audience and you feel close to the characters, but of course this movie is all about the practical jokes and the humour and it is here that it delivers the pay load.

As you would have seen from previous Jackass films, Johnny Knoxville will do anything for a laugh, and nothing changes here. From placing his wedding tackle in a vending machine through to severely embarrassing himself in a strip-club, nothing is taboo. To Knoxville’s credit every prank featured in the film works and even the most hardened critic who may believe themselves above this kind of humor may find themselves crying with laughter in the cinema. Knoxville knows how to make an audience and isn’t that exactly what someone wants from a comedy film?

Of course though, Johnny Knoxville couldn’t just get through this film by getting hurt and putting himself in embarrassing situations. With a script in it he has to also find the ability to act. Luckily though that is something that Knoxville is more than capable of; people forget that over his career he has appeared in films such as “The Dukes Of Hazzard” and “The Ringer” and while he certainly hasn’t had the Academy wanting to give him an award, he has shown that he can be a pretty good comedic actor. Once again, Knoxville more than handles the acting that is required of him in “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa.” Along with a great latex job, Knoxville morphs into Irving eerily well and it’s easy to see how so many people where conned by him as he travelled across America.

Johnny Knoxville’s partner in crime this time around is young Jackson Nicoll who sadly had to endure working on “Fun Size” previously. He was one of the highlights in that film and here in “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa,” he certainly shows himself to be a young comedic actor who may well have a good future ahead of him. Nicoll matches the skills of Knoxville in many scenes and when he is called upon to ad lib he also does sensationally well. He is one comedic actor who certainly needs to have an eye kept on him.

If you’re looking for high art then “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” certainly ain’t there, but if you want a film that will simply make you laugh, then you’d be an idiot to miss it.

Stars(3.5)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #58

Trailer:

The Wolf Of Wall Street

Summary: Jordan Belfort (DiCaprio) is the son of an accountant, hoping to make it big on Wall Street as a stockbroker. Following the crash of 1987 Belfort reinvents himself with the help of Donnie Azoff (Jonah Hill) and close group of unscrupulous friends, starting brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont. Rapidly becoming wealthy beyond his wildest dreams, Belfort develops a hard-partying lifestyle that soon attracts the attention of federal government.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd January, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Martin Scorsese

Screenwriter: Terence Winter, Jordan Belfort (book)

Cast: Ashlie Atkinson (Rochelle Applebaum), Jon Bernthal (Brad), Loretta O. Booz (Wendy), P.J. Byrne (Nicky ‘Rugrat’ Koskoff), Chris Caldovino (Rocco #1), Katarina Cas (Chantalle), Aya Cash (Janet), Kyle Chandler (Agent Patrick Denham), Kenneth Choi (Chester Ming), Robert Clohessy (Nolan Drager), Shea Coleman (Skylar Belfort (14 months old)), Carla Corvo (Pam), Dan Daily (Honorary Raymond Samitz), Leonardo DiCaprio (Jordan Belfort), Bo Dietl (himself), Jean Dujardin (Jean Jacques Saurel), Christine Ebersole (Leah Belfort), Giselle Eisenberg (Skylar Belfort (4 Years Old)), Michael Engberg (Smith), Jon Favreau (Manny Riskin), Danny Flaherty (Zip), Marcus Antonio Gonzalez (Rocco #2), Ted Griffin (Agent Hughes), Jonah Hill (Donnie Azoff), Jake Hoffman (Steve Madden), Christina Jeffs (Venice), Spike Jonze (Dwayne), Dustin Kerns (Ben Jenner), Stephen Kunken (Jerry Fogel), Stephanie Kurtzuba (Kimmie Blezer), Aaron Lazar (Blair Hollingsworth), Ben Leasure (Brantley), Fran Lebowitz (Honorary Samantha Stogel), Joanna Lumley (Aunt Emma), J.C. MacKenzie (Lucas Soloman), Johnnie Mae (Violet), Rizwan Manji (Kalil), Matthew McConaughey (Mark Hanna), Madison McKinley (Heidi), Mackenzie Meehan (Hildy Azoff), Cristin Miliroti (Teresa Petrillo), Ron Nakahara (Rocky Aoki), Michael Nathanson (Barry Kleinman),  Sandra Nelson (Aliyah Farran), Dierdre Reimold (Nicole), Rob Reiner (Max Belfort), Margot Robbie (Naomi Lapaglia), Barry Rothbart (Peter DeBlasio), Brian Sacca (Robbie ‘Pinhead’ Feinberg), Jon Spinogatti (Nicholas the Butler), Ethan Suplee (Toby Welch), Natasha Newman Thomas (Danielle Harrison), Emily Tremaine (Cristy), Shea Whigham (Captain Ted Beecham), Joe Zaso (Bernardo), Henry Zebrowski (Alden ‘Sea Otter’ Kupferberg)

Runtime: 180 mins

Classification:R18+

OUR WOLF OF WALL STREET REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(5)

Please check Adam’s The Wolf Of Wall Street review of that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #65

 

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s The Wolf Of Wall Street review of that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(3.5)

Please check Nick’s The Wolf Of Wall Street review that is available on Southern FM

David Griffiths:

First I do have to admit a real bias when I am reviewing The Wolf Of Wall Street – I am an avid Martin Scorsese film and also an avid Leonardo DiCaprio, yes I have been in heaven for the past few years while they are collaborated together on five films. And yes while films such as Shutter Island and The Departed would make my ‘Greatest Films Ever Made’ list, I am not biased enough to admit that these two have made some ordinary films together, especially The Aviator.

So where does The Wolf Of Wall Street fit on the Leonardo DiCaprio/Martin Scorsese scale. Well to be honest it is pretty bloody high up, because this is a good… no make that… great film. But to preface that I should say this film does go above and beyond to get its R18+ rating because Scorsese has pretty much made a film about a world of sleaze.

Under Scorsese’s wonderful direction DiCaprio plays Jordan Belfort, a young man who is introduced into the world of Wall Street finance by the ‘out there’ Mark Hanna (Matthew McCounaughey) who teaches Jordan the things he needs to succeed are cash, drugs and sex… and that you get them anyway you can.

Jordan’s first journey into Wall Street though doesn’t last after the crash of 1987 and soon Hanna disappears out of the picture and Jordan is left to resurrect himself, this time through a backyard operation that pretty much just sells worthless penny deals. But Jordan sees promise in that and soon he, and his new found buddy the loud Donnie Azoff (Jonah Hill), begin their new operation that has the sole aim of making them money.

Once Jordan is once again wealthy he again reaches Wall Street doing illegal deal after illegal deal while his weaknesses are still cash, drugs and sex… this time with his future wife, the beautiful Naomi Lapaglia (Margot Robbie). Everything is going well until a Federal Agent (played by Kyle Chandler) starts sniffing around Jordan and aims to bring him down.

With The Wolf Of Wall Street Scorsese is once again at the top of his game. He is cunning with the way that he tells this story – yes at times he glorifies the sick lifestyle that Jordan lives, but he also dramatically shows the downside of this lifestyle to the point where anybody watching the film would be an idiot to want to get involved in the finance world. At times Jordan appears to be a God, but that image is shattered when Scorsese allows the grime to reach the surface in shocking acts such as seeing Jordan punch his wife in the stomach. Those that criticize The Wolf Of Wall Street and point out that Scorsese is trying to glorify this film are on the wrong track completely because he is trying to do anything but that.

The critics that have pointed out that Scorsese goes back and reuses some of his old Goodfellas style are right, but always the inventor Scorsese also uses comedy to full affect in The Wolf Of Wall Street… perhaps to give his audience a rest from the onslaught, while he is also creative in the way that he allows Jordan to narrate this film, especially in the sense that Jordan seems to be able to pick and choose what he feels the audience will understand. He may be in his seventies but at least Scorsese is still a director willing to try new things.

Once again Scorsese also gets the best out of Leonardo DiCaprio. Just like he did in Django Unchained DiCaprio relishes the fact that he gets to play an unlikable character here and he is well deserved of all the awards he has been nominated for. But this isn’t just the DiCaprio show, oh no Matthew McConaughey steals the show with his brief performance, Kyle Chandler is once again smooth in his role while Jonah Hill provides more than just comedic relief showing that he is a genuine dramatic actor these days. However the person that deserves a big tick for The Wolf Of Wall Street is Australian actress Margot Robbie who shows that she is more than just a pretty face and delivers some intense acting during her sometimes vicious scenes with DiCaprio. Yes she well and truly deserves her ‘star on the rise’ label.

As previously mentioned The Wolf Of Wall Street is not a film that will be enjoyed by all. It is a powerful, and yes at times graphic film. It may be a little long (some of the scenes wouldn’t have suffered if the editor had been a bit more brutal) but this film once again shows why Martin Scorsese is a living legend when it comes to filmmaking.

Stars(4)  

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Wolf Of Wall Street′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #65 for our full The Wolf Of Wall Street review.

Trailer:

Her

Summary: Set in a stylish Los Angeles of the slight future, Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) is a complex, soulful man left heartbroken after the end of a long relationship. Downloading a new, advanced computer operating system which is individual to each user, he is delighted to meet “Samantha” (Scarlett Johansson), a voice who is insightful, sensitive and surprisingly funny. As her interests and desires grow, in tandem with his own, their friendship deepens in unexpected ways.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 16th January, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Spike Jonze

Screenwriter: Spike Jonze

Cast: Amy Adams (Amy), Robert Benard (Michael Wadsworth), Laura Kai Chen (Tatiana), Brian Cox (Alan Watts (voice)), Bill Hader (Chat Room Friend #2), Sam Jaeger (Dr. Johnson), Scarlett Johansson (Samantha (voice)), Luka Jones (Lewman), Spike Jonze (Alien Child (voice)), Jen Kuhn (Kathy C.), Patrick Lander (Alan Watts), Matt Letscher (Charles), Rooney Mara (Catherine), Carol McFadden (Matilda), Rachel Ann Mullins (Giselle), Joaquin Phoenix (Theodore Twombly), Chris Pratt (Paul), Gracie Prewitt (Jocelyn), Soko (Isabella (voice)), Kristen Wiig (Sexy Kitten (voice)), Olivia Wilde (Blind Date)

Runtime: 126 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR HER REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(4)

Please check Adam’s Her review that is available on The Crat

Greg King: Stars(3)

Please check Greg’s Her review of that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

David Griffiths:

You really do have to wonder just how damaged Michelle Williams and Sofia Coppola have left director (and sometimes actor) Spike Jonze after their relationships with him. Jonze doesn’t put pen to paper very often, but he has with Her, a film that is in one way one of the most romantic love stories you are ever likely to witness, but on the other hand is also one of the most cynical films about love you are ever likely to see. The plus side is that Her is also one of the most beautiful films that you will see this year.

Set in the future Her follows Theodore Twombly, a man who has been severly damaged by his divorce with his ex-wife, Catherine (Rooney Mara) and now simply seems to exist to do his daily job of writing personal letters for other people. Outside of that he seems to only want to indulge in the various technologies located around his home. Even talking with his best friend Amy (Amy Adams) seems to be a chore that is too painful to bear.

Things however change for Theodore when he is offered a new computer program that will make his life a lot easier, what he doesn’t count on though is falling in love with the system’s operator, Samantha (voiced by Scarlett Johansson), although this soon becomes reality for him.

Spike Jonze really does take his audience on a journey with Her. Strange when you consider the film really only centres around Theodore, Joaquin Phoenix is in every scene, and he rarely ever leaves the one city. The fact is though Her takes its audience on an emotional journey. It’s impossible not to like Theodore, the fact that we have all been heartbroken at sometime draws us to him and you want him to succeed. On top of that Jonze has made him an incredibly nice and down-to-earth guy.

And that is how Jonze takes you (the audience) on the journey. As Theodore falls in love with Samantha you can literally feel the same emotions in your heart. Jonze’s script tugs at the heartstrings and you don’t even realise until later on that Theodore has really fallen in love with his computer. The brilliance of the script and the beautiful voice acting of Scarlett Johansson really make the character of Samantha feel very real indeed.

Her also really announces that Spike Jonze deserves to be part of that higher echelon of modern day directors. He’s done some interesting films in the past, but even films like Where The Wild Things Are have shown that Jonze is an exceptionally visual director. Once again here with Her he captures that and at times make the film look like an artist’s canvas.

Also making Her such a fine film are the acting performances of its leads. Amy Adams has been de-beautified for this film and puts in a naturalistic performance while Scarlett Johansson seems to steal the show although she is only a voice actor. Playing Samantha says the gifted actress put in one of the finest voice acting performances of all time as she brings real emotion to every line she says. Then of course there is Joaquin Phoenix who carries this film just like Sam Rockwell in Moon. Just like his director does with this film Phoenix once again reminds audiences why he is one of the most gifted people going around in Hollywood at the moment.

Her is the kind of film that can make anybody cry. Jonze captures the highs and lows of relationships remarkably well in a film that deserves to be listed as a classic.

Stars(5)

 Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  Her (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Her′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #65 for our full Her review.

Trailer:

Her

A new featurette has been released for Spike Jonze’s film “Her.” The films stars Joaquin Phoenix, Rooney Mara, Amy Adams and the voice of Scarlett Johansson. In true Spike Jonze fashion even the featurette looks like a piece of art. You can view the Her featurette below.

 

Golden Globe Awards

The 2014 Golden Globe Award nominations are in, here they are:

 

Best Actor In A Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Matt Damon (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Chiwetel Ejiofor (Dancing On The Edge)
  • Idris Elba (Luther)
  • Al Pacino (Phil Spector)
  • Michael Douglas (Behind The Candelabra)

 

Best Actor In A Motion Picture, Drama

  • Chiwetel Ejiorfor (12 Years A Slave)
  • Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips)
  • Robert Redford (All Is Lost)
  • Idris Elba (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)

 

Best Actor In A Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

  • Bruce Dern (Nebraska)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (The Wolf Of Wall Street)
  • Christian Bale (American Hustle)
  • Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (Her)

 

Best Actor In A TV Series, Comedy

  • Jason Bateman (Arrested Development)
  • Don Cheadle (House Of Lies)
  • Michael J. Fox (The Michael J. Fox Show)
  • Jim Parsons (The Big Bang Theory)
  • Andy Samberg (Brooklyn Nine-Nine)

 

Best Actor In A TV Series, Drama

  • Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
  • Michael Sheen (Masters Of Sex)
  • Kevin Spacey (House Of Cards)
  • James Spader (The Black List)
  • Liev Schreiber (Ray Donovan)

 

Best Actress In A Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Helena Bonham Carter (Burton And Taylor)
  • Rebecca Ferguson (White Queen)
  • Jessica Lange (American Horror Story:Coven)
  • Helen Mirren (Phil Spector)
  • Elisabeth Moss (Top Of The Lake)

 

Best Actress In A Motion Picture, Drama

  • Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
  • Sandra Bullock (Gravity)
  • Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks)
  • Judi Dench (Philomena)
  • Kate Winslet (Labor Day)

 

Best Actress In A Motion Picture, Musical Or Comedy

  • Meryl Streep (August: Osage County)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Enough Said)
  • Amy Adams (American Hustle)
  • Julie Delpy (Before Midnight)
  • Greta Gerwig (Frances Ha)

 

Best Actress In A TV Series, Comedy

  • Zooey Deschanel (New Girl)
  • Lena Dunham (Girls)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Veep)
  • Amy Poehler (Parks And Recreation)
  • Edie Falco (Nurse Jackie)

 

Best Actress In A TV Series, Drama

  • Julianna Margulies (The Good Wife)
  • Kerry Washington (Scandal)
  • Tatiana Maslany (Orphan Black)
  • Robin Wright (House Of Cards)
  • Taylor Schilling (Orange Is The New Black)

 

Best Animated Feature Film

  • Frozen
  • The Croods
  • Despicable Me 2

 

Best Director – Motion Picture

  • Alfonso Cuaron (Gravity)
  • Steve McQueen (12 Years A Slave)
  • David O. Russell (American Hustle)
  • Paul Greengrass (Captain Phillips)
  • Alexander Payne (Nebraska)

 

Best Foreign Language Film

  • Blue Is The Warmest Color
  • The Past
  • The Hunt
  • The Wind Rises
  • The Great Beauty

 

Best Motion Picture, Drama

  • 12 Years A Slave
  • Gravity
  • Captain Phillips
  • Rush
  • Philomena

 

Best Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical

  • Nebraska
  • American Hustle
  • The Wolf Of Wall Street
  • Inside Llewyn Davis
  • Her

 

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

  • Steven Price (Gravity)
  • John Williams (The Book Thief)
  • Hans Zimmer (12 Years A Slave)
  • Alex Ebert (All Is Lost)
  • Alex Heffes (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)

 

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

  • Atlas (The Hunger Games: Catching Fire)
  • Let It Go (Frozen)
  • Ordinary Love (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)
  • Please Mr. Kennedy (Inside Llewyn Davis)
  • Sweeter Than Fiction (One Chance)

 

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

  • John Ridley (12 Years A Slave)
  • Bob Nelson (Nebraska)
  • Eric Warren Singer & David O. Russell (American Hustle)
  • Jeff Pope (Philomena)
  • Spike Jonze (Her)

 

Best Supporting Actor In A Motion Picture

  • Michael Fassbender (12 Years A Slave)
  • Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Bradley Cooper (American Hustle)
  • Daniel Bruhl (Rush)
  • Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips)

 

Best Supporting Actor In A Series, Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Rob Lowe (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Josh Charles (The Good Wife)
  • Aaron Paul (Breaking Bad)
  • Corey Stoll (House Of Cards)
  • Jon Voight (Ray Donovan)

 

Best Supporting Actress In A Motion Picture

  • Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years A Slave)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle)
  • Julia Roberts (August: Osage County)
  • June Squibb (Nebraska)
  • Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine)

 

Best Supporting Actress In A Series, Mini-Series Or TV Movie

  • Hayden Panettiere (Nashville)
  • Jacqueline Bisset (Dancing On The Edge)
  • Janet McTeer (White Queen)
  • Monica Potter (Parenthood)
  • Sofia Vergara (Modern Family)

 

Best TV Movie or Mini-Series

  • American Horror Story: Coven
  • Behind The Candelabra
  • Dancing On The Edge
  • Top Of The Lake
  • White Queen

 

Best TV Series, Comedy

  • The Big Bang Theory
  • Modern Family
  • Girls
  • Brooklyn 99
  • Parks And Recreation

 

Best TV Series, Drama

  • Breaking Bad
  • Downtown Abbey
  • House Of Cards
  • Masters Of Sex
  • The Good Wife