Tagged: The Railway Man

AACTA Awards

The 2015 AACTA Awards were held in Sydney this week. Here are all the major winners.

BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A TV DRAMA

Danielle Cormack (Wentworth)

Ashleigh Cummings (Puberty Blues)

Marta Dusseldorp (Janet King) – WINNER

Kat Stewart (Offspring)

BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A TV DRAMA

Luke Arnold (INXS: Never Tear Us Apart)

Richard Roxburgh (Rake)

Dan Spielman (The Code)

Ashley Zuckerman (The Code) – WINNER

BEST LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT SERIES

The Checkout

Hamish & Andy’s Gap Year: South America – WINNER

Paddock To Plate

The Project

BEST TELE-FEATURE OR MINI SERIES

Carlotta

Devil’s Playground – WINNER

INXS – Never Tear Us Apart

Secrets + Lies

BEST SCREENPLAY IN TELEVISION

Shelley Birse (The Code)

Trent O’Donnell/Phil Lloyd (The Moodys)

Josh Thomas (Please Like Me) – WINNER

Peter Duncan (Rake)

BEST DRAMA SERIES

The Code – WINNER

Janet King

Puberty Blues

Rake

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MOVIE

Patrick Brammall (The Little Death)

Yilmaz Erdogan (The Water Diviner) – WINNER

Robert Pattinson (The Rover)

TJ Power (The Little Death)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MOVIE

Erin James (The Little Death)

Jacqueline Mackenzie (The Water Diviner)

Kate Mulvaney (The Little Death)

Susan Prior (The Rover) – WINNER

BEST DIRECTOR (FILM)

Jennifer Kent (The Babadook) – WINNER

Rolf de Heer (Charlie’s Country)

Michael Spierig/Peter Spierig (Predestination)

David Michod (The Rover)

BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A FILM

Russell Crowe (The Water Diviner)

David Gulpilil (Charlie’s Country) – WINNER

Damon Herrimon (The Little Death)

Guy Pearce (The Rover)

BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A FILM

Kate Box (The Little Death)

Essie Davis (The Babadook)

Sarah Snook (Predistination) – WINNER

Mia Wasikowska (Tracks)

BEST FILM

The Water Diviner – JOINT WINNER

The Railway Man

Charlie’s Country

The Babadook – JOINT WINNER

Tracks

Predestination

The Longford Lyell Award: Andrew Knight

AACTA Trailblazer Award: Rose Byrne

Cinema Nova

Movie loving Melbourne audiences have given Cinema Nova a reason to celebrate the start of 2014 by breaking the arthouse venue’s record for biggest week at the box office.

From Boxing Day to New Year’s Day (26/12/2013 – 1/1/2014) Cinema Nova enjoyed its highest grossing week ever at the box office, notably by screening upscale and arthouse features; a reassurance that Melbourne movie goers are not only interested in Hollywood blockbusters.

New and recent releases including PHILOMENA, THE RAILWAY MAN, AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY and AMERICAN HUSTLE exceeded business expectations while Nova exclusives including SHORT TERM 12, DRINKING BUDDIES, LYGON STREET: SI PARLA ITALIANO, UNCHARTED WATERS and IN BOB WE TRUST captivated audiences intrigued by excellent reviews and strong word-of-mouth. Long-running audience and critical darlings GRAVITY (in its 13th week) and BLUE JASMINE (in its 16th week) also attracted sizable crowds still keen to catch the likely Oscar candidates on the cinema screen.

The previous house record had been set in the first cinema week of 2011 when The King’s Speech commenced its extraordinary charge upon the local & international box office before going on to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards.

Cinema Nova’s General Manager Kristian Connelly said “Over the past twelve months we have explored new filmic territory to great success. Audiences look to Nova to bring them an alternative to what is found at other venues while also providing a selection of the very best that international cinema has to offer, from Gravity and Blue Jasmine to Amour and Tim Winton’s The Turning. Having broken a house record last week without screening any of the top four films at the national box office augurs well for our unique approach.”

With a considerable number of quality releases already dated for release at the Carlton venue, international critic indications suggest the best is still yet to come. Spike Jonze’s futurist love story HER, The Coen Brothers’ folk musical INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS, Steve McQueen’s fact-based drama TWELVE YEARS A SLAVE, Paolo Sorrentino’s award-winning THE GREAT BEAUTY, Cannes Palme d’Or winner BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOUR, Robert Redford survival drama ALL IS LOST, Alexander Payne’s monochrome comedy NEBRASKA, Hayao Miyazaki’s animated THE WIND RISES and Martin Scorsese’s THE WOLF OF WALL STREET all release at Cinema Nova before the Academy Award winners are announced on March 3rd, local time.

With exclusive releases accounting for over a quarter of all feature films playing a theatrical season at Cinema Nova in 2013, the iconic venue plans to expand upon its enthusiasm for unique stories, alternate content and cinema events in the year ahead.

Django Unchained

Well the sun has set on another year in cinema land. Films came, films went. Some exceeded expectations, others went away quickly never to be watched again. But if you are looking for the cream of the crop in 2013, then these are this writer’s favorite ten films.

“Django Unchained” – This is a borderline film for most people’s Top Ten lists this year. In some countries it opened in 2012, in other countries it opened in January 2013, so let’s call it a 2013 film. “Django Unchained” was director/screenwriter Quentin Tarantino at his absolute best. The script sizzled with great one liners and brilliant characterization and while the film did lapse a little (incidentally at about the time that Tarantino himself appeared on the screen), the film did more than enough to be one of this year’s best films. As if the script wasn’t enough to win you over, you then have some marvellous performances by Leonardo DiCaprio and Samuel L. Jackson that make this film a must see.

“The Way Way Back” – Every now and then a coming-of-age film comes along that reminds you just how good this genre can be when it is done the right way. Directors Nat Faxon and Jim Rash certainly go the formula right when they put together “The Way Way Back.” The film saw Steve Carell play one of the best against-type roles of all time as he played the emotional abusive father of Duncan (Liam James) while Sam Rockwell put in one of the finest performances of his career as he played the fun-loving owner of a water theme park. If you didn’t get to see “The Way Way Back” when it hit cinemas make sure you check it out when it reaches shelves on DVD.

“Mud” – There was a time when actor Matthew McConaughey was considered a joke. He acted in poorly written romantic comedies that used him more for his looks rather than acting ability. As a result people started to believe that McConaughey was a poor actor, but he turned that around with some great performances in “Bernie” and “Magic Mike.” 2013 saw McConaughey deliver another powerful performance in “Mud,” a small-time drama in which he plays an escaped convict using an island as a hideaway who uses two local boys Ellis (Tye Sheridan) and Neckbone (Jacob Lofland) to help him escape. Director, Jeff Nichols, manages to make this drama an intense thriller by drawing the audience in and making them wonder exactly what Mud is hiding or willing to do in his escape.

“Rust And Bone” – When people talk about some of the acting performances of 2013, it is surprising how many people seem to skip right over Marion Cotillard’s performance in French film “Rust And Bone.” In what is at times a harrowing film Cotillard plays Stephanie, a young woman who loses her legs in an accident involving a killer whale at the marine park at which she works. In an extraordinary piece of screenwriting, Stephanie’s life is completely turned upside down when she meets Alain (Matthias Schoenaerts), an out-of-luck guy who loves to get involved in backyard fights. “Rust And Bone” may have been a gritty drama, but it is also one of the most intense romances to have surfaced in 2013, making it one of the most underrated films of the year.

“Prisoners” – One of the biggest surprises of this year has been the fact that when all the talk of Oscar nominations has been circulating, the film “Prisoners” hasn’t been getting more love. To be blunt “Prisoners” is one of the best crime thrillers to have surfaced since “Silence Of The Lambs.” Director, Denis Villeneuve makes this an intense thriller that sees Australian Hugh Jackman play Keller Dover a father who is pushed to the absolute extreme when his daughter goes missing along with her friend. Out-acting Jackman, just, is Jake Gyllenhaal who plays one of the most intriguing script cops of all time in Detective Loki. This is one crime thriller that will keep you guessing until the very end.

“Flight” – With “Flight,” cinema goers walked into the cinema expecting to see another disaster film. Denzel Washington would play a pilot who had to save a plane load of people as something went wrong … it would be a simple film right? Director, Robert Zameckis surprised everyone by delivering a film that opened with pilot, Whip Whitaker (Washington) snorting cocaine and drinking before boarding a flight. The film then became a well-written thriller after the plane crashes and the investigation tries to work out whether Whip is a hero or a villain. Sensational writing and a great performance by Washington makes for one hell of a film.

“The Paperboy” – One of the other big surprises of 2013 was the film “The Paperboy.” Zac Efron doesn’t normally spell one of the films of the year but this time the young actor really delivered. Efron plays Jack Jansen, a young boy that works at his father’s local newspaper who teams up with his older brother Ward (Matthew McConaughey) who is a journalist working on a racial murder case. Director, Lee Daniels, gets the absolute best out of his cast. Efron and McConaughey are sensational and are well supported by Nicole Kidman and John Cusack, who both act against type remarkably well.

“Broken” – Just when it looked like it was going to be a lean year for British films along came “Broken.” Directed by Rufus Norris “Broken” was a nasty little film that showed British society at its absolute worst. Told through the eyes of a young girl named Skunk (Eloise Laurence), “Broken” tells the story of the violent events that occur at the end of what should be quite English street. From a man who accused of being a sexual monster, to a broken marriage that is affecting some young children and a father who simply cannot cope any more, this is a film where the audience is left wondering who (if anyone) is going to be left emotionally okay (or even alive) by the final credits. “Broken” is British drama at its best.

“What Maisie Knew” – Another surprisingly good film for 2013. On the surface “What Maisie Knew” looked like it would be a film that should be on the Hallmark channel. Instead it became a gritty drama told through the eyes of a young girl named Maisie (Onata Aprile). This young girl becomes the victim of a bitter custody battle between her washed up rock star mother, Susanna (Julianne Moore), and her proud art-dealing Dad, Beale (Steve Coogan). The film had the power to emotionally affect anybody watching it as it soon becomes painfully plain that neither parents want the girl; they just don’t want their ex-partner to have her. “What Maisie Knew” delivers one of the most emotional scripts of the year.

“The Railway Man” – Rounding out the top ten is a late contender with the Australian/British co-production “The Railway Man.” Over the years a lot of filmmakers have told the story of how men cope when they return from war. Few, however, have focused on a story where a victim returns and faces the man who tortured them. Based on a hit novel, “The Railway Man” centers around Eric Lomax (Colin Firth), a man whose war demons come to the surface after he has married Patricia Wallace (Nicole Kidman). As the ghosts who have haunted him since he was a POW forced to work on the Thai Burma Railway come to the fore, Patricia inspires him to return to the scene of the crime, unaware that it will result in a tense standoff with Nagase (Hiroyuki Sanada). The scenes of the two men confronting each other made for some of the best cinematic moments of 2013.

It would be neglectful not to also mention the following films when talking about the best films of 2013. Also worth a look is “Thanks For Sharing” (with a surprisingly good performance by Pink), “Lygon Street: Si Parla Italiano,” “West Memphis Three,” “Trance,” “A Place Beyond The Pines,” “Performance (A Late Quartet),” “Silver Linings Playbook,” “Compliance,” “The Impossible,” “Warm Bodies” and “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints.”

Now that 2013 is out of the way, it is time to wait and see what new gems film lovers can uncover in 2014. Bring it on!

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Nick, Adam, Dave and Greg take a look at new release films ‘Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues’, ‘Drinking Buddies’, ‘Frozen’, ‘The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug’, ‘Philomena’, ‘The Railway Man’, ‘The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty’ and ‘Walking With Dinosaurs’. This episode also features interviews with Ben Stiller, Judi Dench, Jonathan Groff, Will Ferrell, Steve Carrell, Paul Rudd, Orlando Bloom and Ian McKellan. The boys also launch a new competition thanks to The Electric Shadow Open Air Cinema.

Please note that Part 1 of the show will be placed online after the embargo has been lifted on our review of ‘Saving Mr Banks’. All other reviews can be heard on Part 2,3,4,5 though.

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here