Tagged: Tony Briggs

DVD Packshot

Summary: In the very near future, creatures from ancient mythology must live among humans and battle for survival in a world that wants to silence, exploit and destroy them.

Year: 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: 1st September 2016

Country: Australia

Directors: Wayne Blair (4 episodes), Leah Purcell (2 episode)

Screenwriters: Jane Allen (1 episode), Jon Bell (2 episodes), Michael Miller (6 episodes)

Main Cast: Jada Alberts (Nerida West), Tony Briggs (Boondee), Rob Collins (Waruu West) , Ryan Corr (Blair Finch) , Stef Dawson (Ash Kerry), Iain Glen (Jarrod Slade),  Marcus Graham (McIntyre), Rarriwuy Hick (Latani), Deborah Mailman (Aunty Linda), Andrew McFarlane (Matthews) , Frances O’Connor (Charlotte Cleary), Hunter Page-Lochard (Koen West), Tamala Shelton (Alinta West), Tyson Towney (Djukara), Tasma Walton (Araluen)

Sub Cast: Jeremy Ambrum (Jake) – 5 episodes, Benson Jack Anthony (Gub) – 5 episodes, Lilly Bader (Lilly) – 1 episode, Adam Briggs (Maliyan) – 6 episodes, Jack Charles (Uncle Jimmy) – 1 episode), Jerome Cosgrave (Jumbhi) – 3 episodes, Lynette Curran (Virgil) – 2 episodes, Nancy Denis (Eve) – 5 episodes, Isaac Drandic (Harry) – 5 episodes, Kamil Ellis (Mungo) – 6 episodes, Rhondda Findleton (Frankie) – 5 episodes, Sean Hawkins (Joel) – 1 Episode, Aileen Huynh (Everick) – 3 episodes, Trevor Jamieson (Uncle Max) – 5 episodes, Jack Kingsley (Aiden) – 1 episode, Alexis Lane (Kora) – 6 episodes, Kathy Marika (Ngumunga) – 2 episodes, Rosharyn Marr (Young Koen) – 1 episode, Julian Maroude (Anton) – 1 episode, Jack Mars (Cameron) – 1 episode, Josh McConville (Dickson) – 3 episodes, Robyn Nevin (Jane O’Grady) – 1 episode, Sam Paronson (Taki) – 1 episode, Rahel Romahn (Ludo) – 1 epsiode, Mark Simpson (Holbeck) – 1 episode, Waverley Stanley Jnr. (Kulya) – 6 episodes, Miranda Tapsall (Lena) – 1 epsiode, Jenny Templeton (Alice) – 1 episode, Ben Toyer (Jamie) – 1 episode, Elijah Valadian-Wilson (Young Waruu) – 3 episodes, Katie Wall (Rowena) – 3 episodes, Leeanna Walsman (Belinda) – 4 episodes, Val Weldon (Jirra) – 2 episodes, Georgia Wilde (Melissa) – 1 episode, Matthew Wilkinson (Kennedy) – 2 episodes, Dylan Young (Nick) – 1 episode,

Runtime: 6 x 50 mins eps

Classification: MA15+

 

CLEVERMAN SEASON 1 REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths:

The Australian film industry has always had an interesting relationship with the genre of television. Over the years we’ve produced some pretty decent sci-fi programs – shows like ‘Farscape’ and ‘Spellbinder’ immediately spring to mind, but for some reason the people providing the money for the industry seem to shy away from the genre, instead looking to push more dour dramas onto the audience. Well now comes a sci-fi show that will hopefully change all of that – Cleverman. Mark my words this show is guaranteed to become a cult classic… it’s just that damn good.

Cleverman is set in the future, a time when Sydney is living under the threat of ‘hairies’ – a so called ‘subhuman’ species who are currently being considered a threat. People react different to the ‘hairies’, Governmental departments led by the likes of Geoff Matthews (Andrew McFarlane – ‘The Flying Doctors’) and McIntyre (Marcus Graham – ‘Mulholland Drive’) see them as a threat that needs to be contained and eventually eradicated. Business-men like Jarrod Slade (Iain Glen – ‘Game Of Thrones’) see them as a way of making a mountain money, while small-time operators like Koen West (Hunter Page-Lochard – ‘Spear’) and his best mate, Blair Finch (Ryan Corr – ‘The Water Diviner’) also see them as a cash cow. Then there are people like Waruu West (Rob Collins – ‘The Wrong Girl’) who are sworn to protect them as they see the treatment of the ‘hairies’ as the same way their Aboriginal ancestors were treated.

It is hard to put into words just how good ‘Cleverman’ really is. This sci-fi goes a lot further than most other shows in the genre and gets so political at times it makes you see Australian history in a whole different light. The screenwriters of this show have taken the wrongs of Australia’s past and condensed into such a format that anybody can see just how wrong the Government have handled things such as the stolen generation and Aboriginal deaths in Police custody over the years. Like the feature film, ‘Red Billabong’, ‘Cleverman’ also explores Aboriginal culture and mythology… two things I’ve probably learnt more about watching this television show then I ever did in my year at high school.

The political side of things pushed to the background this show also works because of the relationships between each of the characters. The growth surrounding the character of Koen has to be seen to be believed and the resulting conflict that these changes cause with his half-brother Waruu ignite the second half of this season. The real test comes when the audience sits in suspense as you wait to see which brother is going to make the right decisions in the season finale.

The hard edged nature of this show also lifts the program high above most other shows airing on television at the moment. Yes there are moments of violence as hairies and humans clash but is things such as a character knowing impregnating his wife with a hairy for scientific research and a hairy being forced into a sick form of prostitution that really makes this program stand out from the pack.

The edgy nature of the program also brings out the best in its cast. Aussie favourites like Tasma Walton (‘Blue Heelers’) and Deborah Mailman (‘The Secret Life Of Us’) are standouts in their strong roles but the stand out here is Iain Glen who dominates the acting stakes as he plays the mysterious Slade whose intentions are often questionable. Credit must also be paid to Hunter Page-Lochard and Rob Collins who both announce themselves as actors to watch in the future with strong performances that make this show a must see.

While firmly planted in the sci-fi genre ‘Cleverman’ is a show that takes a deep look at Aboriginal history and social issues while also providing enough believable drama between its characters to make you want to watch each week. The fact that Season One builds up to a crescendo that looks set to explode in Season Two means this is a show that you have to watch if you haven’t already done so.

Stars(5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):   Stars(5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Cleverman (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Cleverman Season 1 reviews: Nil.

 

Trailer:

Healing Poster

Summary: After 18 years in prison, Viktor Khadem (Don Hany – East West 101, Offspring, Serangoon Road, Broken Shore) is a man who has almost given up on life. Near the end of his sentence he is sent to Won Wron, a low-security prison farm 200 km outside Melbourne in regional Victoria, where Senior Case Worker Matt Perry (Hugo Weaving) has established a unique program to rehabilitate broken men through giving them the responsibility for the rehabilitation of injured raptors – beautiful, fearsome proud eagles, falcons and owls. Against all odds, Matt takes on Viktor as his number one test case, introducing him to Yasmine, the majestic Wedge-tailed Eagle with a two metre wingspan. If these two can tame each other, anything is possible.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 8th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Craig Monahan

Screenwriter: Craig Monahan, Alison Nisselle

Cast: Dimitri Baveas (Yousef), Laura Brent (Stacey), Tony Briggs (Travis), Justine Clarke, Don Hany (Viktor Khadem), Anthony Hayes (Warren), Tony Martin (Prison Warden), Jane Menelaus (Glynis), Joana Pires (Mrs. Yousef), Xavier Samuel (Paul), Richard Stables (Ted), Robert Taylor (Vander), Harry Tseng (Dave), Hugo Weaving (Matt Perry), Mark Leonard Winter (Shane)

Runtime: 120 mins

Classification: M

OUR HEALING REVIEWS & RATINGS:

David Griffiths:

Over the past few years the prison genre of both the small screen and the big screen has become a reason for screenwriters to portray the art of brutality. Bashings, stabbings even the odd prison gets thrown in as Hollywood expects the audience to believe that most prisons are an absolute war zone. It’s therefore a bit of a relief to sit down and watch Healing, a film that is more about the rehabilitation and emotions of prisoners rather than the physical violence that goes along with prison life.

The central character of Healing is Viktor Khadem (Don Hany – TV’S Devil’s Playground & Serangoon Road), a fifty-something prisoner who has just been placed in the low security prison, Won Wron, as a way to prepare himself for release after serving eighteen years in Pentridge for murder. Here he finds himself befriending the lonely and quite, Paul (Xavier Samuel – Plush, Drift) – a prisoner who doesn’t like to talk about why he is in prison and certainly doesn’t want to see his family.

On his arrival at Won Wron one of the guards, Matt Perry (Hugo Weaving – The Mule, The Turning) realises that Viktor needs to seriously change before he is released but can’t find the right rehabilitation program for him. After seeing Viktor’s reaction to finding an injured wedge-tailed eagle he manages to talk the prison hierarchy into allowing him to set up a program headed up by Viktor which would see a select number of prisoners get to work closely with Healesville Sanctuary looking after injured birds of prey.

The program begins running and seems to have a positive effect on Viktor, however its whole existence seems to rest on the behaviour of Shane (Mark Leonard Winter – The Boy Castaways, Green Eyed), a prisoner whose limited mental capacity makes him seek out approval from those around him, sadly for the others that normally means he is loyal to the prison’s ‘king-pin’ Warren (Anthony Hayes – The Broken Shore, TV’S Secrets & Lies).

The first thing that hits you about Healing is the cinematography. Filmed by Oscar-winning cinematographer Andrew Lesnie, who most would know from his work on The Lord Of The Rings trilogy, the film conjures up some beautiful shots of the wildlife at hand while also capturing some bird-eye views of the Victorian countryside that is rarely seen on the big screen. The visual brilliance of the film is well matched by an emotional script that really captures the thoughts and mind set of prisoners who have to face the reality of once again embarking on the big wide world.

Healing does have its faults though. There is the editing which sadly lets down the spectacular visuals. The cuts are noticeable (which should never happen in feature film) and at times makes you feel like you are watching something like Neighbours or Home & Away. The fact that the film’s bad guy, Anthony Hayes’ Warren, seems to throw back to every prison bad guy stereotype also drags down the film a little as well and at the end of the day makes him less menacing than he should be.

Another plus for the film however is the cast. The fact that smaller roles are filled by actors of the calibre of Tony Martin (Blood Brothers, Closed For Winter) and Robert Taylor (TV’S Mr & Mrs Murder & Longmire) gives a strong testament to how good this script is. Then there is Xavier Samuel and Mark Leonard Winter who put in credible performances, but they are outshone here by the leading men Hugo Weaving and Don Hany. Weaving puts in one of his relaxed-but-still-gripping performances while Hany delivers the performance that his legion of fans expected. Since his early days in White Collar Blue and his award-winning portrayal of Zane Malick in multicultural Police drama East West 101 the public has known that Don Hany would one day become a leading man that warrants feature film status. That certainly arrives with Healing which sees Hany play a character that is almost twenty years older than he actually is. To get into the role he ate junk food and started smoking, the result is a strong performance that should see him start to warrant overseas attention for his services.

Healing is hardly the kind of film that is going to be lapped by the popcorn brigade, no this is more a film for those who love good cinema. Heartfelt and warm Healing is the kind of film that will affect some emotionally.

Stars(3.5)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating: Nil.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Healing′: Please check Dave’s Healing review that aired on First On Film on J-Air on the 4th May, 2014.

Trailer:

Healing Poster

Pinnacle Films has launched the trailer for HEALING, the highly anticipated new film from multi-award winning Australian writer/director Craig Monahan (The Interview – AFI Best Film Award Winner, Peaches).

Healing is a powerful, moving story of redemption, the discovery of hope and the healing of the spirit – in the most unlikely place, for the most unique men, through the most unusual catalyst.

Don Hany (The Broken Shore, Serangoon Road, East West 101, Offspring) makes his feature film leading role debut as Viktor Khadem, a man who has almost given up on life after 18 years inside. Near the end of his sentence he is sent to Won Wron, a low-security prison farm 200 km outside Melbourne in regional Victoria, where Senior Case Worker Matt Perry (Hugo Weaving) has established a unique program to rehabilitate broken men through giving them the responsibility for the rehabilitation of injured raptors – beautiful, fearsome proud eagles, falcons and owls.

Against all odds, Matt takes on Viktor as his number one test case, introducing him to Yasmine, the majestic Wedge-tailed Eagle with a two metre wingspan. If these two can tame each other, anything is possible.

Inspired by real events, Healing is a new Australian film written and directed by Craig Monahan, the multi-award winning director of The Interview – Winner of Best Film – Australian Film Institute Awards.

The film was shot by Oscar®-winning cinematographer Andrew Lesnie (The Hobbit, LOTR, Babe, Bran Nue Dae) with music by Oscar®- nominated composer David Hirschfelder (Elizabeth, Shine, Strictly Ballroom, The Truman Show, Australia)

Don Hany and Hugo Weaving are joined by a roll-call of some of Australia’s best talent including Xavier Samuel, Tony Martin, Mark Leonard Winter, Jane Menelaus, Robert Taylor, Anthony Hayes, Justine Clarke, Laura Brent and Tony Briggs.


HEALING is released in Australia on 8 May 2014 by Pinnacle Films.

Worawa

A new production of the stage play of THE SAPPHIRES by Worawa Aboriginal College, with special guest narrator Rachel Maza, will be a night to remember in Melbourne on Saturday August 31.

Worawa Aboriginal College, a boarding school for Aboriginal girls, is headed by Lois Peeler, one of the original Sapphires, on whose story the smash hit film was based.

“The success of the play and the film of THE SAPPHIRES has been a huge inspiration to girls at College, many of whom are interested in a future in the arts.  The production, based on Tony Briggs’ stage play, is their opportunity to shine,” Ms Peeler said.

Ms Peeler said that the producers of the film of THE SAPPHIRES have lent the College the original costumes from the film.

The Worawa Aboriginal College SAPPHIRES SCHOOL PRODUCTION will be held on Saturday August 31 at 7pm at the Karralyka Centre, Mines Road, Ringwood.  Tickets are $45 and include finger food, coffee and tea. Three of the ‘Original’ Sapphires and Writer of the stage play Tony Briggs will attend the event along with Rosemary Blight, Producer of the block buster film.

Worawa was founded by Aboriginal visionary Hyllus Maris in the early-1980s and provides a holistic education and boarding experience for Aboriginal young women in the middle years of schooling (Years 7 – 10) who come from Aboriginal communities across the country.

Book online at:  trybooking.com/DBSK

For further information contact:  Worawa Aboriginal College

Email:     admin@worawa.vic.edu.au

Ph:          03 5962 4344

AFCA

The nominations for the 2013 AFCA Awards are:

BEST FILM: Hail, Lore, The King Is Dead, The Sapphires, Wish You Were Here

BEST DIRECTOR: Wayne Blair (The Sapphires), Amiel Courtin-Wilson (Hail), Kieran Darcy-Smith (Wish You Were Here), Ralph de Heer (The King Is Dead), Cate Shortland (Lore)

BEST ACTOR: Joel Edgerton (Wish You Were Here), Matthew Goode (Burning Man), Daniel P Jones (Hail), Ewen Leslie (Dead Europe), Chris O’Dowd (The Sapphires)

BEST ACTRESS: Toni Collette (Mental), Deborah Mailman (The Sapphires), Felicity Price (Wish You Were Here), Saskia Rosendahl (Lore), Sarah Snook (Not Suitable For Children)

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Marton Csokas (Dead Europe), Liev Schrieber (Mental), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Dead Europe), Antony Starr (Wish You Were Here), Garry Waddell (The King Is Dead)

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Essie Davis (Burning Man), Rebecca Gibney (Mental), Deborah Mailmen (Mental), Jessica Mauboy (The Sapphires), Bojana Novakovic (Burning Man)

BEST SCREENPALY: Amiel Courtin-Wilson (Hail), Cate Shortland & Robin Mukherjee (Lore), Rolf de Heer (The King Is Dead), Keith Thompson & Tony Briggs (The Sapphires), Kieran Darcy-Smith & Felicity Price (Wish You Were Here)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: Adam Arkapaw (Lore), Germain McMicking (Hail), Germain McMicking (Dead Europe), Jules O’Loughlin (Wish You Were Here), Garry Phillips (Burning Man), Warwick Thornton (The Sapphires)

BEST EDITING: Jason Ballantine (Wish You Were Here), Martin Connor (Burning Man), Dany Cooper (The Sapphires), Veronika Jenet (Lore), Peter Sciberras (Hail)

BEST MUSIC SCORE: Steve Benwell (Hail), Antony Partos (33 Postcards), Max Richter (Lore), Cezary Skubiszewski (The Sapphires), Graham Tardif (The King Is Dead)

BEST OVERALL PRODUCTION DESIGN: Zohie Castalleno (Hail), Melinda Doring (The Sapphires), Silke Fischer (Lore), Steven Jones-Evans (Burning Man), Graham Walker (Mental)

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM (FOREIGN LANGUAGE): A Separation, Holy Motors, Le Havre, The Kid With A Bike, The Raid

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM (ENGLISH LANGUAGE): Argo, Beasts Of The Southern Wild, Deep Blue Sea, Hugo, Moonrise Kingdom

BEST DOCUMENTARY: All The Way Through Evening, I Am 11, Life In Movement, Paul Kelly: Stories Of Me, Searching For Sugarman

The Sapphires

The winners of the 2nd annual Australian Academy of Cinema and Televsion Arts Awards were last night announced at a star studded ceremony in Sydney last night. The night was hosted by Russell Crowe and the Awards were announced by the likes of Cate Blanchett, Geoffrey Rush, Nicole Kidman, Stephen Curry and Ricky Ponting.

Here is the full list of winners.

FILM

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
• Iron Sky. Samuli Torssonen, Jussi Lehtiniemi, Juuso Kaari, Kelly Myers.

AACTA RAYMOND LONGFORD AWARD
• Al Clark

TELEVISION
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CHILDREN’S TELEVISION SERIES
• The Adventures of Figaro Pho. Dan Fill, Frank Verheggen, David Webster. ABC3

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION COMEDY SERIES
• Lowdown – Season 2. Nicole Minchin, Amanda Brotchie, Adam Zwar. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION SERIES
• Agony Aunts. Adam Zwar, Nicole Minchin. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE IN A TELEVISION COMEDY
• Patrick Brammall. A Moody Christmas. ABC1

SHORT FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT ANIMATION
• The Hunter. Marieka Walsh.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT FICTION FILM
• Julian. Robert Jago, Matthew Moore.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN A SHORT FILM
• Transmission. Zak Hilditch.

DOCUMENTARY

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FEATURE LENGTH DOCUMENTARY
• Storm Surfers 3D. Ellenor Cox, Marcus Gillezeau.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY UNDER ONE HOUR
• Then The Wind Changed. Jeni McMahon, Celeste Geer. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY SERIES
• Go Back To Where You Came From. Rick McPhee, Ivan O’Mahoney. SBS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Fighting Fear. Macario De Souza. FOXTEL – Movie Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Fighting Fear. Tim Bonython, Chris Bryan, Macario De Souza, Lee Kelly. FOXTEL – Movie Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Once Upon A Time In Cabramatta – Episode 1. Sam Wilson. SBS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Dr Sarmast’s Music School. Dale Cornelius, Livia Ruzic, Keith Thomas. ABC1

FEATURE FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
• The Sapphires. Warwick Thornton.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING
• The Sapphires. Dany Cooper ASE.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND
• The Sapphires. Andrew Plain, Bry Jones, Pete Smith, Ben Osmo, John Simpson.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE
• Not Suitable For Children. Matteo Zingales, Jono Ma.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
• The Sapphires. Melinda Doring.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN
• The Sapphires. Tess Schofield.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST YOUNG ACTOR
• Saskia Rosendahl. Lore.

NEWS.COM.AU AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD FOR MOST MEMORABLE SCREEN MOMENT
• The Sapphires.

BYRON KENNEDY AWARD
• Sarah Watt

TELEVISION
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST REALITY TELEVISION SERIES
• The Amazing Race Australia. Michael McKay, Trent Chapman, David Gardner, Matthew Kowald. Seven Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES
• Puberty Blues. John Edwards, Imogen Banks. Network Ten

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEFEATURE OR MINI SERIES
• Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War. John Edwards, Mimi Butler. Nine Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN TELEVISION
• Jack Irish: Bad Debts. Jeffrey Walker. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN TELEVISION
• Redfern Now – Episode 6 ‘Pretty Boy Blue’. Steven McGregor. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Richard Roxburgh. Rake – Season 2. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Leah Purcell. Redfern Now – Episode 1 ‘Family’. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Aaron Jeffery. Underbelly Badness – Episode 3 ‘The Loaded Dog’. Nine Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Mandy McElhinney. Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War – Part 2. Nine Network

FEATURE FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FILM
• The Sapphires. Rosemary Blight, Kylie du Fresne.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
• The Sapphires. Wayne Blair.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
• Wish You Were Here. Kieran Darcy-Smith, Felicity Price.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
• The Sapphires. Keith Thompson, Tony Briggs.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR
• Chris O’Dowd. The Sapphires.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS
• Deborah Mailman. The Sapphires.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
• Antony Starr. Wish You Were Here.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
• Jessica Mauboy. The Sapphires.
2nd AACTA Awards_Winners and Nominees_Luncheon, Ceremony & International Page 10 of 10

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY
• Django Unchained. Quentin Tarantino.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
• Silver Linings Playbook. David O. Russell.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST ACTOR
• Daniel Day-Lewis Lincoln.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST ACTRESS
• Jennifer Lawrence. Silver Linings Playbook.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST FILM
• Silver Linings Playbook. Donna Gigliotti, Bruce Cohen, Jonathan Gordon.

Summary:It s 1968, and four young, talented Australian aboriginal girls learn about love, friendship and war when their all girl group the sapphires entertain the us troops in Vietnam.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 9th August, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 7th December, 2012

Country: Australia

Director: Wayne Blair

Screenwriter: Tony Briggs, Keith Thompson

Cast: Merelyn Adamson (Major Wicks), Tammy Anderson (Evelyn), Don Battee (Myron Ritchie), Kylie Belling (Geraldine), Nioka Brennan (Young Kay), Carlin Briggs (Young Jimmy), Eko Darville (Hendo), Martin Farrugia (Max), Gregory J. Fryer (Selwyn), Georgina Haig (Glynnis), Annette Hodgson (Noelene), Tory Kittles (Robby), Tanika Lonesborough (Young Gail), Judith Lucy (Merle), Miah Madden (Young Julie), Deborah Mailman (Gail), Jessica Mauboy (Julie), Wayne McDaniel (Lou McGarrick), Amy Miller-Porter (Vera), Ava Jean Miller-Porter (Young Cynthia), Rhys Muldoon (Uncle Ed), Koby Murray (Baby Hartley), Lynette Narkle (Nanny Theresa), Chris O’Dowd (Dave), Hunter Page-Lochard (Steve Kayne), T.J. Power (Lt. Jenson), Ben Rodgers (Fish), Jake Ryan (Cochese), Jasper Sarkodee (Pinky), Shari Sebbens (Kay), Miranda Tapsell (Cynthia), Tom Whitechurch (Young Tommy), Cleave Williams (Duggie), Meyne Wyatt (Jimmy Middleton)

Runtime: 103 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Sapphires’ Review:

Red Dog started the ball rolling now it seems that other filmmakers have realised that not all Australian films have to be about dark, depressing topics. Certainly director, Wayne Blair (TV’S Lockie Leonard & Redfern Now) has realised that as his feature film directional debut, The Sapphires is an uplifting tale that is guaranteed to please any audience.

Based on real events The Sapphires is about three Aboriginal sisters, Gail (Deborah Mailman – Mabo, TV’S Offspring), Julie (Jessica Mauboy – Bran Nue Dae, TV’S Underbelly) and Cynthia (Miranda Tapsell – Mabo, TV’S Magical Tales) who dream about escaping the Aboriginal mission they call home and making it big as singers.

The dream seems fair fetched as they live in a racist outback town but when failed musician Dave (Chris O’Dowd – Friends With Kids, Bridesmaids) he decides to manage them, patch up differences with their cousin, Kay (Shari Sebbens – Violet) and then help them win a competition that will see them perform for the troops in Vietnam.

Thanks to a brilliant screenplay The Sapphires is able to provide the audience with a variety of comedy, drama and music. The film does go into some pretty deep subjects such as racism and tribal acceptance yet never once do you feel that the message is completely in your face.

With The Sapphires Wayne Blair also announces himself as one of Australia’s most promising directors. Together with cinematographer Warwick Thornton (who directed the brilliant Samson & Delilah) he makes this film look stunning on the big screen. Credit must be paid to both of them for making the Vietnam war scenes look so realistic despite a small budget.

The film does have some flaws, at times the story and some of the acting verge on being weak, but this is largely overshadowed by an amazing soundtrack and some brilliant performances by the films leads. Deborah Mailman again shows why she is one of Australia’s finest actors while Chris O’Dowd mixes comedy and drama together brilliantly in what is the best performance of his career so far. They are also well supported by Jessica Mauboy who is beginning to show that she is a talented actress as well as an amazing singer.

The Sapphires is an amazing film that works on all levels. The fact that it mixes music, drama and comedy together so well makes it an absolute gem.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Sapphires’: http://www.helium.com/items/2358683-movie-reviews-the-sapphires-2012

Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating:The Sapphires (2012) on IMDb