Tagged: Victor Garber

Sicario

Summary: When FBI Agent Kate Macer (Emily Blunt), her partner Reggie (Daniel Kaluuya) and her boss, Jennings (Victor Garber) accidentally uncover a Mexican drug cartel’s house of death Kate suddenly finds herself thrust into a brand new, very dangerous world.

With Jennings’ blessing Kate finds herself recruited to join a black-op mission led by special Agent Matt graver (Josh Brolin) and a Columbian operative known only as Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro). The mission soon sees Kate very much in the middle of the borderland drug war in a word where there seems to be no rules whether you are on the side of good or evil.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th September 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Denis Villeneuve

Screenwriter: Taylor Sheridan

Cast: Edgar Arreola (Guillermo), Jon Bernthal (Ted), Emily Blunt (Kate Macer), Josh Brolin (Matt Graver), Julio Cedillo (Fausto Alarcon), Benicio Del Toro (Alejandro), Laurence Scott Deveraux (Alex Driver), Jeffrey Donovan (Steve Forsing), Victor Garber (Dave Jennings), David Garver (Bob Fisks), Maximiliano Hernandez (Silvio), Daniel Kaluuya (Reggie Wayne), Lora Martinez-Cunningham (Jacinta), Jesus Nevarez-Castillo (Eliseo), Hank Rogerson (Phil Coopers), Bernardo P. Saracino (Manuel Diaz), Boots Southerland (U.S. Marshall Keith), Adam Taylor (U.S. Marshall Kevin), Matthew Tompkins (Jessie Garza), Raoul Trujillo (Rafael), Kevin Wiggins (Burnett)

Runtime: 121 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR SICARIO REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

No I’m not chucking in my card to the Comic Book And Cult Film Lovers Association but one of the films I was most looking forward to this year was Sicario. Yes I am not too embarrassed to admit that the fact that a certain director is at the helm of a movie is sometimes enough to make me wanna see a film and that was certainly the case here. See to me Denis Villeneuve’s last film was a cinematic masterpiece. I can watch Prisoners over and over again and find something new that I like about each time, add that to the fact that Villeneuve was directing a borderland crime film starring Josh Brolin and yes Sicario had me at hello. My biggest fear for Sicario was that Hollywood would have claimed Villeneuve and that he would decide to rope in his grittiness and harshness, luckily that certainly isn’t the case here.

Many have labeled Sicario a blockbuster for this year, yet that title just doesn’t seem to fit comfortably with this film. This film is harsh, bloody harsh and it’s not hard to see that the popcorn set are going to struggle with the film’s brutal opening in with Kate finds a house that contains more dead bodies than your local morgue. And in typical Villeneuve fashion he doesn’t make it easy watch for its audience, no as he goes in for the close-up on a decaying man’s face you are well and truly aware of the fact that while he is making a Hollywood film he certainly hasn’t been claimed by Hollywood.

Visually Sicario is a blessing. Villeneuve along with DOP Roger Deakins have made this movie look like some kind of modern day western with it’s yellow tinge and cinematic aerial desert shots, and somehow that works wonders with Brolin and Del Toro cruising around like modern day Sherrifs seeking vengeance. Sadly though Sicario’s screenplay isn’t always as good as the visuals the audience are being treated to. Unlike Prisoners this film has some weak points that leave the audience shaking their head, nothing major but little moments like Kate picking up the Police Officer in the bar… isn’t it just too much coincidence that her partner would just happen to be good friends with the guy?

Still there are powerful moments in Sicario, moments that are so powerful that they will stick in your mind for ages. From the fact that this is a very much anti-Mexican tourism video as Villeneuve takes you past bodies hanging from Mexican border-town overpasses to suspenseful scenes such as the border battle which will have any cinema lover watching with baited breath. Then there is the magnificent finale with Del Toro and a dining table… I’m not going to say anything else but that as I don’t want to spoil the film… but hell it is one of the most suspenseful scenes you are going to see in cinema for a long, long time. Adding to the suspense all throughout this film is the pounding soundtrack that simply becomes a character upon itself.

Now you may have heard some people criticize Emily Blunt’s acting performance in Sicario. Don’t believe it. She puts in a great effort and those complaining about her performance are simply looking for something that doesn’t need to be there. Kate is not Lara Croft in a Police uniform. She’s a very innocent but good at her job cop normally used to dealing with hostage situations who suddenly finds herself thrown into a world she just doesn’t understand. Anyone that goes into this film expecting Blunt to be the gun-ho character she was in Edge Of Tomorrow is going to be disappointed, it’s just not what Kate is.

Then there is Brolin and Del Toro who knock their performances out of the park. Brolin is gruff and rough as you expect him to be and is well backed up by Del Toro who has an air of mystery about him from the moment he first appears on the screen here. Some of the Del Toro’s performances have been a little questionable recently (no I still have not recovered from that scene with him, Diaz and a windshield in The Counselor) but here he bounces back with a brutal performance and for once he doesn’t over act his way through it. He’s just on song.

If you’re a fan of Denis Villeneuve’s past films you are certainly not going to be disappointed by Sicario. It is brutal, rough and in-your-face, just the way a crime thriller should be. Brolin and Del Toro bring their A-Games and this is one film that is a must see for 2015.

Stars(4)

 
 

 

 

Adam Ross:

You can hear Adam’s full Sicario review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147

 

 

 

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Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Sicario review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

 

 

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Nick Gardener:

 

You can hear Nick’s full Sicario review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating: Sicario (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Sicario reviews: You can listen to our full Sicario  review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147. You can also read our Sicario review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Argo

Summary:As the Iranian revolution reaches a boiling point, a CIA ‘exfiltration’ specialist concocts a risky plan to free six Americans who have found shelter at the home of the Canadian Ambassador. They must shoot a film in Iran.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 25th October, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Ben Affleck

Screenwriter: Joshuah Bearman (article), Chris Terrio

Cast: Omid Abtahi (Reza Borhani), Ben Affleck (Tony Mendez), Ryan Ahern (Sgt. Sickmann), Alan Arkin (Lester Siegel), Adrienne Barbeau (Nina), Kerry Bishe (Kathy Stafford), John Boyd (Lamont), Rob Brownstein (Landon Butler), J.R. Cacia (Brice), Kyle Chandler (Hamilton Jordan), Rory Cochrane (Lee Schatz), Bryan Cranston (Jack O’Donnell), Kelly Curran (Princess Aleppa), Christopher Denham (Mark Lijek), Danilo Di Julio (Sgt. Gauthier), Richard Dillane (OSS Officer Nichols), Tate Donovan (Bob Anders), Clea DuVall (Cora Lijek), Nikka Far (Tahran Mary), Victor Garber (Ken Taylor), Roberto Garcia (Sgt. William Gallegos), Lindsay Ginter (Hedley Donovan), Matthew Glave (Col. Charles W. Scott), John Goodman (John Chambers), Bob Gunton (Cyrus Vance), Zeljko Ivanek (Robert Pender), Bill Kalmenson (Hal Saunders), Richard Kind (Max Klein), Jon Woodward Kirby (Fred Kupke), Page Leong (Pat Taylor), Barry Livingston (David Marmor), Karina Logue (Elizabeth Anne Swift), Victor McCay (Malick), Scoot McNairy (Joe Stafford), Jamie McShane (William J. Daugherty), Chris Messina (Malinov), Araz Vahid Ebrahim Nia (Moradi), Matt Nolan (Peter Genco), Michael Parks (Jack Kirby), Tim Quill (Alan Sosa), Ali Saam (Ali Khalkhali), Yuri Sardarov (Rossi), Taylor Schilling (Christine Mendez),  Christopher Stanley (Thomas L. Ahern Jnr.), David Sullivan (Jon Titterton), Aidan Sussman (Ian Mendez), Keith Szarabajka (Adam Engell),  Bill Tangradi (Alan B. Golacinski), Shelia Vand (Sahar), Titus Welliver (Bates)

Runtime: 120 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Argo’ Review: 

Ben Affleck may as well start preparing room on one of his shelves because he’ll soon be bringing home a new friend named Oscar. While many films are dubiously called ‘film of the year’ Argo isn’t just one that truly deserves that title, it actually deserves to be called one of the films of the generation.

Based on real events Argo is set in late 1979 and early 1980 when a group of American Embassy workers are taken hostage during a revolution in Iran (then called Tehran). What worries the American Government even more is the fact that some of the workers escaped the embassy and need to be rescued from where they are hiding in the Canadian Ambassador’s House. With their lives in danger the government wants them rescued as quickly as possibly but with guards patrolling all the airports it is going to take a very special story to get past them.

Enter CIA Agent Jack O’Donnell (Bryan Cranston – Total Recall, Rock Of Ages) who turns to one of his top operatives, Tony Mendez (Ben Affleck – To The Wonder, The Town) to come up with a believable story. However when Tony gets famous producer John Chambers (John Goodman – Flight, Trouble With The Curve) and director Lester Siegel (Alan Arkin – Arigo, The Muppets) on board to try and trick the Iranian Government into thinking that Hollywood is about to film a sci-fi blockbuster in their country it is up to O’Donnell to try and get a list of people including Hamilton Jordon (Kyle Chandler – Super 8, TV’S Friday Night Lights) to see that this far-fetched plan could actually work.

While many have criticized Ben Affleck for some of the poor acting roles he has filmed over the years you certainly can’t criticise his directing skills. With films like Gone Baby Gone and The Town under his belt Affleck cemented himself as one of the most exciting directors going around. Argo tops any of them though and shows Affleck is in fact one of the most talented directors that Hollywood has ever seen.

Few directors manage to present suspense to their audience in the way that Affleck does with Argo. So tense are the scenes at the airport that the audience are on the edge of their seat yet Affleck still makes the film completely natural, he never milks it for theatrical effect and as a result the audience at the Melbourne media screening was so impressed they broke out into a round of applause… something that rarely happens with modern films.

The naturalistic feel to Argo enhances many scenes and when you see photographs of the actual events (and the people that took part in them) you can see that Affleck has gone for a brand of perfection that just goes to show what a fine director he really is.

Argo is a guaranteed Oscar winner and will go down in history as one of the finest movies ever made.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Argo′: http://www.helium.com/items/2384900-movie-reviews-argo-2012 Also check Episode #5 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Argo’

Rating: 5/5

IMDB Rating: Argo (2012) on IMDb