Tagged: Woody Allen

Magic In The Moonlight

Summary: An uptight English magician (Firth), who prides himself on knowing the detail behind every popular illusion, reconnects with an old colleague while on tour in Europe. Intrigued by the story of a young spirit medium (Stone) who claims to be able to speak with the dead husband of a wealthy widow (Weaver), the pair travel to the sun-dappled coastal villa of the family to assist in unmasking this possible swindle. Set during the 1920s against a backdrop of the Côte d’Azur, glorious provincial mansions, garden parties and fashionable jazz joints,

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th August, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Woody Allen

Screenwriter: Woody Allen

Cast: Eileen Atkins (Aunt Vanessa), Colin Firth (Stanley), Marcia Gay Harden (Mrs. Baker), Erica Leerhsen (Caroline), Hamish Linklater (Brice), Simon McBurney (Howard Burkan), Catherine McCormack (Olivia), Jeremy Shamos (George), Emma Stone (Sophie), Jacki Weaver (Grace)

Runtime: 97 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Magic In The Moonlight review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #94

Stars(3.5)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Magic In The Moonlight review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #94

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

It seems like talented actor/director Woody Allen really is Mr. Teflon. The scandals that have plagued his personal life over the years would have been enough to bring other filmmaker’s careers crashing down around them. They would have become box office poison and eventually been shunned by film studios right around the world.

That certainly hasn’t happened with Allen though who has instead just merrily gone about his business churning out at least one film a year for as long as I can remember. The good thing about that though is that even with age the level of greatness he has managed to bring to each of his films has never dropped. Over recent years he has proved that with films such as To Rome With Love, Midnight In Paris and Vicky Cristina Barcelona which have all been absolute gems.

Now comes Magic In The Moonlight a film that sees Allen drag his audience make into the roaring 1920s as he tells the story of the talented yet seemingly perennially grumpy Stanley (Colin Firth) who is brought in to investigate the claims by a young girl named Sophie (Emma Stone) who says that she is able to predict people’s futures with her connection to the ‘universe.’

With a rich family, including young Brice (Hamish Linklater), believing every word that Sophie says and now giving her money for her services Stanley’s good friend Howard (Simon McBurney) demands that he investigates her.

Not only does Allen make sure the set design for this period is absolutely spot on but he has also delivered a film that almost feels like it was made back in these times as well. A time when filmmakers knew that a good script and some great acting were far more important to the audience then special effects or the like. In fact if Allen had filmed Magic In The Moonlight in the black-and-white you could have been excused for thinking the film was a re-born classic. Yes, this isn’t the kind of film that you want to watch in the latest multiplex cinema, to get the true beauty of this film you really need to hunt down the oldest theatre in your city and go watch it there.

Having praised Mr. Allen to high heaven though it is worth pointing out that Magic In The Moonlight is not one of his finest films, but then even an ordinary Woody Allen film is usually better than most films out at the time. Still Magic In The Moonlight does have all the things that a true Allen fan looks for his films – the witty dialogue, the big twist and an air of mystery that only the masters of old can manage to create.

But there is one big weakness with Magic In The Moonlight, and that is the romance element. It does work and despite some fears that whole idea of Colin Firth and Emma Stone coming together isn’t as gag worthy as what we had to sit through with Zeta-Jones and Connery in Entrapment, but the romantic element of the film seems to be the only reason that the last quarter of the film has been tacked on. Once the big reveal happens the romance seems unnecessary and as a result the ending of the film drags a little as all the suspense has already dissipated.

Just like all of Allen’s films though, he gets the best out of his cast. As usual Colin Firth is smooth and seems to enjoy the opportunity of delivering some of the catty lines that Allen’s script contains. At times it does feel like the screenplay has called upon Firth to almost parody the a 1920s gentlemen and he seems to do that well. He is also well supported by Emma Stone who seems to keep being able to silence her critics who cruelly suggest that she has better looks than talent. While she doesn’t exactly steal the show like she did in Easy A she again shows that she can move between comedy and drama in a heartbeat with ease.

Magic In The Moonlight is far from one of Woody Allen’s best films. The romance coming to the fore towards the end does let it down a little, but for the most part it does work. Just be warned that the film is aimed for an older demographic so if you are a little on the younger side this may not be the film for you.

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Magic in the Moonlight (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Magic In The Moonlight′: For our full Magic In The Moonlight review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #94. You can also read Dave’s Magic In The Moonlight review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Fading Gigolo

Summary: Murray (Woody Allen), a New York City bookstore owner, turns to high-class pimping in order to keep financially afloat in face of the imminent closure of his business.

To succeed at the world’s oldest profession, Murray needs a Don Juan. He appeals to his florist friend Fioravante (John Turturro) for assistance and before long, the oddball duo tear up Gotham, with Fioravante (who now goes by Virgil) shtupping eager clients the likes of legendary sexual icons Sharon Stone and Sofia Vergara. Murray’s plan seems fail safe until he introduces Avigal (Vanessa Paradis), a sheltered and lonely orthodox Jewish widow, to Virgil’s mix of clientele. As a deeper connection develops between Virgil and Avigal, Dovi (Liev Schreiber), a vigilant member of the neighborhood’s Jewish police who shares affection for Avigal, develops a fool-proof plan of his own.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 1st May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: John Turturro

Screenwriter: John Turturro

Cast: Woody Allen (Murray), Bob Balaban (Sol), Delphina Belle (Rhuki), Teddy Bergman (Yossi), Isaiah Clifton (Cyrus), Jade Dixon (Cee Cee), Dante Hoagland (Coco), Aubrey Joseph (Cefus), Ness Krell (Little Devorah), Vanessa Paradis (Avigal), Tonya Pinkins (Othella), Russell Posner (Malky), Liev Schreiber (Dovi), Sharon Stone (Dr. Parker), Ted Sutherland (Shmuel), M’Barka Ben Taleb (Mimou), Diego Turturro (Shimshon), John Turturro (Fioravante), Sofia Vergara (Selima)

Runtime: 90 mins

Classification: M

OUR FADING GIGOLO REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Fading Gigolo review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #77

Stars(3)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Fading Gigolo review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #77

Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Fading Gigolo (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Fading Gigolo′: For our complete Fading Gigolo review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #77.

Trailer:

"To Rome With Love" World Premiere

Warner Bros. Pictures announced today that Jesse Eisenberg has been set to star as Lex Luthor and Jeremy Irons will play Alfred in the upcoming Zack Snyder untitled Superman/Batman film. The dual announcement was made today by Greg Silverman, President, Creative Development and Worldwide Production, and Sue Kroll, President, Worldwide Marketing and International Distribution, Warner Bros. Pictures.

Snyder stated, “Lex Luthor is often considered the most notorious of Superman’s rivals, his unsavory reputation preceding him since 1940. What’s great about Lex is that he exists beyond the confines of the stereotypical nefarious villain. He’s a complicated and sophisticated character whose intellect, wealth and prominence position him as one of the few mortals able to challenge the incredible might of Superman. Having Jesse in the role allows us to explore that interesting dynamic, and also take the character in some new and unexpected directions.”

The director added, “As everyone knows, Alfred is Bruce Wayne’s most trusted friend, ally and mentor, a noble guardian and father figure. He is an absolutely critical element in the intricate infrastructure that allows Bruce Wayne to transform himself into Batman. It is an honor to have such an amazingly seasoned and gifted actor as Jeremy taking on the important role of the man who mentors and guides the guarded and nearly impervious façade that encapsulates Bruce Wayne.”

Eisenberg received Academy Award®, Golden Globe Award, Screen Actors Guild Award® and BAFTA Award nominations for his starring role as Mark Zuckerberg in David Fincher’s “The Social Network.” He also starred in Woody Allen’s “To Rome with Love” and Louis Letterier’s “Now You See Me.” He next appears in “The Double” and “Night Moves.”

Irons won the Academy Award® for his portrayal of Claus von Bülow in “Reversal of Fortune.” His work in the film also garnered him a Golden Globe Award. He won an Emmy Award and a Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award® for his performance in the TV miniseries “Elizabeth I,” opposite Helen Mirren, and recently starred on the small screen as Rodrigo Borgia in Neil Jordan’s highly acclaimed Showtime series “The Borgias,” for which Irons earned a Golden Globe nomination. He was recently nominated for a SAG Award® for the PBS Great Performances television miniseries “The Hollow Crown,” for his performance as Henry IV.

The film is set to open in Australian cinemas May 5, 2016, and is based on Superman characters created by Jerry Siegel & Joe Shuster, Batman characters created by Bob Kane, and Wonder Woman created by William Moulton Marston, appearing in comic books published by DC Entertainment.

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Recently the hosts of ‘The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show’ came up with their favourite directors here’s who is made their lists.

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

David Fincher

  • Anthony Minghella
  • Shane Meadows
  • Todd Field
  • Bobby Farrelly
  • Peter Farrelly
  • Andrew Dominik
  • Clint Eastwood
  • Rian Johnson
  • John Hillcoat
  • Alfonso Cuaron
  • Steven Spielberg
  • Paul Greengrass
  • Ben Affleck
  • Adam McKay
  • Steve McQueen
  • Ang Lee
  • Matthew Vaughn
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Joe Carnahan
  • Derek Cianfrance
  • Todd Solondz
  • Paul Verhoeven
  • John McTiernan
  • Kathryn Bigelow
  • Peter Weir
  • Michael Mann
  • Sam Mendes
  • Robert Zemeckis
  • Ron Howard
  • Terrence Malick
  • Brian De Palma
  • Alexander Payne
  • Sam Raimi
  • David Cronenberg
  • Ridley Scott
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Darren Aronofsky
  • James Cameron
  • Martin Scorsese
  • David Fincher

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Steven Soderbergh

  • Rob Zombie
  • Alkinos Tsilimidos
  • Ben Affleck
  • Lars von Trier
  • Danny Boyle
  • Steven Soderbergh
  • Woody Allen
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Larry Clark
  • Gus Van Sant
  • Kelly Reichardt
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Rian Johnson
  • Joss Whedon
  • Kevin Williamson
  • Kevin Smith

 

GREG KING

Quentin Tarantino

  • Alfred Hitchcock
  • Sam Peckinpah
  • Stanley Kubrick
  • Christopher Nolan
  • David Fincher
  • Ridley Scott
  • Tony Scott
  • Woody Allen
  • James Cameron
  • Ben Affleck
  • Quentin Tarrantino
  • Clint Eastwood
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Steven Spielberg

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

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  • Steven Spielberg
  • James Cameron
  • Ridley Scott
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Errol Morris
  • Ben Affleck
  • Mike Leigh
  • Ang Lee
  • Richard Linklater
  • John Ford
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Roman Palanski
  • Quinten Tarantino
  • David Fincher
  • Peter Weir
  • David Lynch
  • Francis Coppolla
  • Orson Welles
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Stanley Kubrick
  • Woody Allen
  • Alfred Hitchcock

Blue Jasmine

Summary: After everything in her life falls to pieces, including her marriage to wealthy businessman Hal (Alec Baldwin), elegant New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) moves into her sister Ginger’s modest apartment in San Francisco to try to pull herself back together again.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 12th September, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Woody Allen

Screenwriter: Woody Allen

Cast: Alec Baldwin (Hal), Tammy Blanchard (Jane), Cate Blanchett (Jasmine), Louis C.K. (Al), Bobby Cannavale (Chili), Max Casella (Eddie), Andrew Dice Clay (Augie), Alden Ehrenreich (Danny), Ali Fedotowsky (Melanie), Sally Hawkins (Ginger), Emily Hsu (Amy), Daniel Jenks (Matthew), Tom Kemp (Nat), Andrew Long (Ed), Annie McNamara (Nora), Max Rutherford (Johnny), Peter Sarsgaard (Dwight), Carl Schreiber (Tristan), Michael Stuhlbarg (Dr. Flicker), Charlie Tahan (Young Danny), Kathy Tong (Raylene)

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification:M

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘BLUE JASMINE’:

Greg King: Stars(4)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Blue Jasmine’ that is available on www.filmreviews.com.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(4)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Blue Jasmine’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 49

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  Blue Jasmine (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Blue Jasmine′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 49 for our in-depth review of ‘Blue Jasmine.’

Trailer:

You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger

Summary: Director Woody Allen once again assembles an all-star cast including Anthony Hopkins, Naomi Watts and Josh Brolin for his comedy of two couples who find their lives turned upside down by unfulfilled longings. Alfie (Hopkins) is the husband of Helena (Gemma Jones) and the father of Sally (Watts). Sally’s marriage to Roy (Josh Brolin) is in jeopardy after she falls for Greg (Antonio Banderas). Both father and daughter find themselves running away from their romantic problems.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 17th January, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, Spain

Director: Woody Allen

Screenwriter: Woody Allen

Cast: Roger Ashton-Griffiths (Jonathan), Antonio Banderas (Greg), Ewan Bremner (Henry Strangler), Josh Brolin (Roy), Pauline Collins (Cristal), Anna Friel (Iris), Anthony Hopkins (Alfie), Celia Imrie (End Wicklow), Neil Jackson (Alan), Theo James (Ray), Gemma Jones (Helena), Alex Macqueen (Malcolm Dodds), Zack Orth (Narrator), Jim Piddock (Peter Wicklow), Freida Pinto (Dia), Lucy Punch (Charmaine), Naomi Watts (Sally), Fenella Woolgar (Jane)

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stanger’ Review: 

Poor old Woody Allen (To Rome With Love, Midnight In Paris) while directing the brilliant ‘Midnight In Paris’ resurrected his career and once again reminded the world of the fact that he is a filmmaking genius but it has also cast a shadow of everything he has released ever since. See you make a masterpiece and nothing else quite equals it.

‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger’ was actually made before ‘Midnight In Paris’ but is only just surfacing in Australia now, and to be honest it is a pretty good romantic drama but it is nowhere near as good as ‘Midnight In Paris’.

The film’s plot follows two couples. Firstly there is Helena (Gemma Jones – The Lady Vanishes, TV’S Death In Paradise) and Alfie (Anthony Hopkins – 360, Thor) who have just become divorced after Alfie went through an old-age crisis and decided he was too young for Helena… when actually he is just refusing to admit that he is growing old.

Now Helena is trying to get her life back on track after a failed suicide attempt by listening to everything that so-called medium, Cristal (Pauline Collins – Quartet, Albert Nobbs) is telling her. Meanwhile Alfie is leaking money like there is no tomorrow in a bid to impress his younger bride, escort and sometimes actress Charmaine (Lucy Punch – Stand Up Guys, Yellow).

Then there is Helena and Alfie’s daughter Sally (Naomi Watts – Two Mothers, Movie 43) who is married to frustrated writer Roy (Josh Brolin – Gangster Squad, Men In Black 3). While neither would admit the love went out of their marriage a long time ago and now Roy is stimulated by next door neighbor Dia (Freida Pinto – Immortals, Black Gold) while Sally is developing feelings for her boss Greg (Antonio Banderas – Ruby Sparks, Haywire).

If you think you’ll settle into watching ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger’ and laugh away at Woody Allen’s usual witty comedy think again! Here Allen takes a trip down the romantic drama path and it has to be said that it works quite well. The fact that Allen has brought his usual style of characterisation to the film is what makes it work so well. Each character is unique and you are quickly drawn to them.

As a film ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stanger’ does twist and wind its way through the characters’ lives but it is not an aimless journey instead it seems as though Allen is using the film to take a fair swipe at love, suggesting that the illusion of love is better than love itself. It may be a little cynical but Allen’s good script really allows him to make a powerful statement.

As usual Allen has put together a stellar cast and once again they deliver for him. Naomi Watts as usual does a great job while it’s good to see Josh Brolin shrug off some of the cornier roles that he has done recently. It is also good to see Anthony Hopkins also take on a role where he can once again show that he can be a dramatic actor without having to go down the ‘evil’ path.

Yes ‘You Will Meet A Talk Dark Stranger’ is nowhere near as good as ‘Midnight In Paris’ but it is still a worthy romantic drama to check out.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger′: Check Episode #16 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger’. Dave’s other review of ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Rating: 3.5/5

IMDB Rating: You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger (2010) on IMDb

Paris Manhattan

Summary: Idealistic pharmacist Alice (the adorable Alice Taglioni) is totally obsessed with the works of Mr. Allen. She surrounds herself with images of him, continually quotes lines from his films and even prescribes her customers DVDs of his movies to help alleviate their ailments; it’s little wonder she’s still single in her thirties! Alice’s increasingly concerned Jewish parents hope to cure her fixation by setting her up with a handsome French gentleman (Patrick Bruel), but even he quickly realises that he’s no match for the man of her dreams.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 13th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: France

Director: Sophie Lellouche

Screenwriter: Sophie Lellouche

Cast: Marie-Christine Adam (Nicole), Woody Allen (himself), Patrick Bruel (Victor), Margaux Chatelier (Laura), Gladys Cohen (Mme Gozlan), Louis-Do de Lencquesaing (Pierre), Marine Delterme (Helene), Arsene Mosca (Arthur), Yannick Soulier (Vincent), Alice Taglioni (Alice)

Runtime: 80 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Paris-Manhattan’ Review: 

Dave’s review of ‘Paris-Manhattan’ can be found here on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Paris-Manhattan′: Check Episode #12 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Paris-Manhattan’.

Rating: 2.5/5

IMDB Rating: Paris-Manhattan (2012) on IMDb