Tagged: Anni Finsterer

Summary: During World War II a young Aboriginal woman sees the injustice that she and her community endures under white settlement and decides to get revenge.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 21st January 2021 (Australia),

VOD Release Dates: 6th January 2021 (Australia)

Country: Australia

Director: Victoria Whafre McIntyre

Screenwriter: Victoria Wharfe McIntyre

Cast: Brendan Bacon (Tick), Eddie Baroo (Bushy), Suzannah Bayes-Morton (Marlee), Lance Brown (Doug Bradfield), Vida Elaine Brown (River Brown), Sarah Butler (Sister Marie), Shaka Cook (Waru Banganha), Angus Rose Dann (Alinta), Joy Jasmin Dann (Lowanna), Kenneth Paul Dann (Nudgee), Priscilla Vida Isabelle Dann (Darri), Summer Sky Dann (Molly), Lucas Dillon (Young Kelly), Anni Finsterer (Wilma Wilson), Rob Flanagan (Terry), Karen Garnsey (Pam Bradfield), Barnaby Hanning (Young Shamus), Rupert Hanning (Young Paddy), Maci Grace Johnson (Wanna), Aaron Jeffrey (William ‘Minto’ Minton), Dean Krywood (Shamus/Paddy Mackay), Simone Landers (Binda Banganha), Alexis Lane (Jarah Banganha), Keith Learn (Sorley Mackay), Peter McAllum (Gerald Mackay), Joseph James Brown McLeod (Gari), Justine Angus May Brown McLeod (Alkina), Paul James McLeod (Uncle Jack), Michael McStay (Constable Neale), Jillian O’Dowd (Constable Brady), Socrates Otto (Miller), Daniel Potts (Detective MacGregor), Soraya Rennie (Billie), Toby James Sakeld (Jackson), Petra Salsjo (Majorie), Tykia Simpson (Young Jarah), Tyson Towney (Knorre), William Usic (Jim Wilson), Bendedict Wall (Kelly Mackay), Dalara Williams (Maggie Banganha), Sarah Woods (Meg)

Running Time: 117 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia)

OUR WORDS THE FLOOD REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The Flood Review:

I often laugh as a film critic when I see somebody try to compare one film to another when really the films actually don’t share that much in common. That is certainly the case with the brand new Australian film The Flood. As soon as the trailer landed people were comparing it to The Nightingale.

Now I will admit that The Flood does share some similar themes – revenge and retribution (but so does a million other films out there on the market) and it does explore indigenous culture, although to say that it explores the same aspects of indigenous culture as The Nightingale I would have to say is incredibly narrow minded.

Directed by Victoria Wharfe McIntyre (Miro) The Flood explores several themes that I have found to have been sadly not explored on the Australian cinematic landscape. Topics such as indigenous Australians fighting for Australia in war and the brutal rapes that many First Nation’s women had to endure at the hands of the white settlers.

The film centres around Jarah Banganha (Alexis Lane – Cleverman) who during the time of World War II watches as her family is ripped apart by the new ‘laws’ introduced by white settlers including the cruel Gerald Mackay (Peter McAllum – The War At Home) and his son (Dean Kyrwood – Water Horse). While Jarah experiences the first hand cruelty delivered by the settlers her anger is further fuelled when her husband Waru (Shaka Cook – Top End Wedding) returns from war is not treated the same way as his best friend, Minto (Aaron Jeffrey – X-Men Origins: Wolverine).

There is often a harsh diversity to The Flood. The visuals of the Australian bush from cinematographer Kevin Scott (Backburning) are truly spectacular and beautiful but at the same time the events happening in and around them are of sheer brutality. Having said that though the brutal nature of the film is in context and possibly the only way to describe what Victoria Wharfe McIntyre does with the film as similar to the style of Quentin Tarantino with Django Unchained or Inglorious Basterds.

While important themes and often forgotten parts of Australian history are explored during The Flood it is important to remember that at the heart of this film is a genre flick. Dig deep under the storyline of the film is a harsh, yet realistic western caked in revenge in desperation. The mere fact that the screenplay allows for character and character development of course means the film is a lot better than some other revenge flicks I have had to sit through over the years.

I think what I will take away from this film though is the excitement that surrounds the future of Victoria Wharfe McIntyre, Alexis Lane and Shaka Cook. I get a distinct feeling that McIntyre is going to be a great Australian director while it will not take long for Hollywood to come calling for Alexis Lane. Shaka Cook is also sensational in this film and of course has already been snapped up to be part of the Australian production of Hamilton.

While comparisons to the masterpiece that is The Nightingale is completely unfair in its own right The Flood is an amazing genre film that lifts the lid on some of the darker sides of Australian history.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

The Flood (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture The Flood Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Teenage Kicks Still1

Shooting wraps today on new Australian feature film TEENAGE KICKS. After five weeks of principal photography in Sydney’s inner-west, south-eastern and northern suburbs the cast and crew have formed a strong bond and are incredibly proud of their achievements on the independently funded film.

On the experience of principal photography, writer/director Craig Boreham says, “The TEENAGE KICKS set has been such a great hub of collaboration that it’s almost sad to see it end. Miles (Szanto) has really thrown his all into bringing Miklós Varga and his world to life, as has the rest of our amazing cast.” He adds, “Working with Bonnie Elliot again, to tell this story, has been fantastic and we have a wonderful collaboration on set. Finishing the shoot is bittersweet, saying goodbye to the cast and the team. But it’s exciting to be moving into the edit period with Adrian Chiarella where we will get to discover our story all over again.”

Producer Annmaree J Bell adds, “It is an amazing journey we are on, I’m feeling very blessed to have the crew and cast we have to bring the film to life.” 

To coincide with the end of principal photography, three first look stills have been released. Featuring principal cast members, lead actor Miles Szanto (The Elephant PrincessLove My Way, Bruno & Earlene Go to Vegas), Daniel Webber (The CombinationK9Sleeping Beauty) and Charlotte Best (Home and AwayPuberty Blues), these first look stills provide an insight into this beautiful and nuanced story. Craig Boreham’s vision for his compelling and evocative coming-of-age drama exploring the minefield of adolescence, burgeoning sexuality and the desire to belong, is beginning to show.

TEENAGE KICKS tells the story of Miklós Varga as he navigates his way through identity, explosive sexuality and guilt, struggling to mature from boy to man. In the final moments of his seventeenth year, Miklós’ world has come crumbling down. His plans to run away and escape the hold of his migrant family have been brutally undone by family disaster. Only Mik knows the events that led to this tragedy and as far as he can see there is only one person to blame: himself.

Mik is suddenly torn between his desire to head north and start a new life with his best friend Dan, and the obligation to his broken family. Can he rise to meet his family’s expectations or is he toxic, destined to bring ruin upon everyone he loves?

Alongside Miles Szanto, Daniel Webber and Charlotte Best, the talented cast of TEENAGE KICKS also includes Shari Sebbans (The SapphiresRedfern Now), Ian Roberts (Little FishSuperman ReturnsUnderbelly: A Tale of Two Cities) and Anni Finsterer (The Boys are BackSleeping BeautyPrime MoverAccidents Happen).

A production from Azure Productions Pty Ltd, TEENAGE KICKS is a collaborative passion project for all involved. TEENAGE KICKS was completely independently financed with the support of private investment and a successful Pozible crowdfunding campaign. LevelK is handling International Sales.

Teenage Kicks Still3Teenage Kicks Still2

Shari Sebbens

Principal photography on new Australian feature film TEENAGE KICKS begins today in and around Sydney. Filming over the next five weeks, Sydney’s Inner West and south-eastern suburbs will provide an impressive backdrop to this nuanced, compelling and evocative coming-of-age drama exploring the minefield of adolescence, burgeoning sexuality and the desire to belong.

Helmed by award winning writer/director Craig Boreham and producer Annmaree J Bell, the film’s talented cast includes Miles Szanto (The Elephant Princess, Love My Way, Bruno & Earlene Go to Vegas) in the lead role, Daniel Webber (The Combination, K9, Sleeping Beauty), Charlotte Best (Home and Away, Puberty Blues), Shari Sebbans (The Sapphires, Redfern Now), Ian Roberts (Little Fish, Superman Returns, Underbelly: A Tale of Two Cities) and Anni Finsterer (The Boys are Back, Sleeping Beauty, Prime Mover, Accidents Happen).

With an original screenplay by Craig Boreham, TEENAGE KICKS tells the story Miklós Varga as he navigates his way through identity, explosive sexuality and guilt, struggling to mature from boy to man.

In the final moments of his seventeenth year, Miklós Varga’s world has come crumbling down. His plans to run away and escape the hold of his migrant family have been brutally undone by family disaster. Only Mik knows the events that led to this tragedy and as far as he can see there is only one person to blame: himself.

Mik is suddenly torn between his desire to head north and start a new life with his best friend Dan, and the obligation to his broken family. Can he fill the shoes of his adored sibling or is he toxic, destined to bring ruin upon everyone he loves?

“We are really exploring that ‘in-between’ phase that we all go through. That cusp moment between teen and adult when the world can turn on its head every single day and you are still trying to find where you fit in the scheme of things,” said writer/director Craig Boreham. “TEENAGE KICKS is an in-your-face, raw look at that time and the issues and struggles these young characters go through when they come crashing toward adulthood. It’s an evocative, sexually charged story that I think most people can relate to,” he added.

TEENAGE KICKS is a feature film adapted from Craig and Annmaree’s multi-award winning short film Drowning. Together Craig and Annmaree’s films have screened in over 500 festivals around the world and have attracted the attention of renowned figures in the Australian film industry. Angie Fielder, producer of Wish You Were Here, said, “Craig Boreham is a fresh, contemporary cinematic voice. He immerses his audience in complete and cinematic worlds, and authentically captures the complexities of teenage lust and sexuality. His characters are melancholic and beautiful, trapped in their insecurities and dying to break free from their angst.”

Collaborating with Craig once again, producer Annmaree J Bell leads an accomplished and talented crew that includes production designer Virginia Mesiti, editor Adrian Chiarella and cinematographer Bonnie Elliott, also Director of Photography for These Final Hours which recently screened at the Cannes Film Festival. Of TEENAGE KICKS Annmaree said, “There was such an amazing response to Drowning that it was the logical next step to adapt it into a feature. We are so passionate about TEENAGE KICKS, I’m thrilled to be working with Craig and our amazing team to bring this incredible film to Australian and international audiences.”

A production from Azure Productions Pty Ltd, TEENAGE KICKS is a collaborative passion project for all involved. The filmmakers are dedicated to integrity with a drive to create, inspire, achieve. TEENAGE KICKS was financed completely independently with the support of private investment and a successful Pozible crowdfunding campaign. LevelK is handling International Sales.