Tagged: Greta Gerwig

Summary: Jo March reflects back and forth on her life, telling the beloved story of the March sisters – four young women each determined to live life on their own terms.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 1st January 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 9th January 2020

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Greta Gerwig

Screenwriter: Greta Gerwig, Louisa May Alcott

Cast: Dash Barber (Fred Vaughn), Timothee Charlamet (Theodore ‘Laurie’ Laurence), Chris Cooper (Mr. Laurence), J.M. Davis (Susan Robbins), Laura Dern (Marmee March), Lilly Englert (Kate Vaughn), Sasha Frolova (Mrs. Hummel), Louie Garrel (Friedrich Bhaer), Jayne Houdeyshell (Hannah), Ana Kayne (Olivia), Tom Kemp (Asa Melvin), Charlotte Kinder (Viola), Adrianne Krstansky (Mrs. Dashwood), Tracy Letts (Mr. Dashwood), Bill Mootos (Mr. Davis), Jen Nikolaisen (Evelyn Meriweather), James Norton (John Brooke),  Bob Odenkirk (Father March), Maryanne Plunkett (Mrs. Kirke), Florence Pugh (Amy March), Abby Quinn (Annie Moffat), Jared Reinfeldt (Ned Moffat), Hadley Robinson (Sallie Gardiner Moffat), Saoirse Ronan (Jo March), Amber Leanne Rothberg (Young Meg), Eliza Scanlen (Beth March), Meryl Streep (Aunt March), Emma Watson (Meg March), Lewis D. Wheeler (Josiah Workman)

Running Time: 135 mins

Classification: G (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR LITTLE WOMEN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

Timeless tales never die. That is the only defence you can really use against people who are convinced that the new adaption of Little Women should never have been made. Yes, there have been a number of cinematic versions of Louisa May Alcott’s classic tale that have made it to the big screen over the years, but every adaption has its own tone and feel and that is what makes them unique. I can remember the same being said when Baz Luhrmann re-created Romeo + Juliet… and look how well that ended up turning out. Besides after the quirkiness of Ladybird how could anybody not be curious to see what Greta Gerwig was going to do with Alcott’s classic.

Gerwig does do little to change the basic storyline. The film is set in 1868 with Jo March (Saoirse Ronan – Brooklyn), a budding young writer getting a story published by a local publisher. At the same time her work is heavily criticised by one of her co-workers and in a bid to escape how she feels about it she uses the fact that her sister, Beth (Eliza Scanlen – Sharp Objects) is sick to return home. As she spends time with her mother (Laura Dern – Wild) and her other two sisters, Meg (Emma Watson – Harry Potter & The Philospher’s Stone) and Amy (Florence Pugh – The Commuter) she reflects on their lives and the obstacles they have overcome.

A scathing critic would probably try to point out that Little Women’s main focus is on female empowerment but I would argue that Gerwig’s film goes even deeper than that. This is not simply a film about female empowerment this is the film that explores the notion of how a family pulls together to overcome some of the most turbulent and life-changing obstacles that anybody can face. From the harsh fights between Amy and Jo, through the four sisters having to face numerous struggles with their father is off at war this is more a film about family then it is anything else.

The power of this version of Little Women though is how much the film draws you into the character’s lives. At a quick glance the character of Jo could be considered cold-hearted especially towards the men in her life, including Laurie (Timothee Chalamet – Beautiful Boy). But through the power of Gerwig’s writing and directing the audience gets to see what makes Jo this way and that is something that can’t be said for all versions of Little Women. Gerwig also allows the film to show the struggle of the artist as well – whether it be a writer, a painter or a teacher all find themselves tested during this time of war and this secondary element to the plot adds a powerful element to the film that continues to draw the audience in.

What also drives this film is a repeat of one of the strengths from Lady Bird. As a director it is obvious that Gerwig knows how to draw the best out of her cast. Here Saoirse Ronan is once again in award winning form and she is well supported by Emma Watson and Florence Pugh who both seem to have turned up their acting game several levels as well. In regards to Ronan though she is well directed by Gerwig with the scene of the final confrontation between herself and Laurie being an absolute highlight. The raw emotion that is generated from the screen during the scene is a rarity in modern day cinema and needs to be cherished.

A special mention must also be made to Meryl Streep (The Devil Wears Prada). While she has limited screen time she managed to steal every scene she was in with a truly powerful performance. Her scenes with both Saoirse Ronan and Florence Pugh are some of the best examples of brilliant acting you will all year. There is a real power with those scenes and neither younger actress seems to be over-awed by the fact that they are sharing the scene with acting royalty.

Every adaption of Little Women has something that sets it apart from the others but few have the sheer emotion and power that we see here with Gerwig’s interpretation. Here Gerwig uncovers secret layers to the plot that lesser filmmakers would have not noticed while at the same time she directs one of the most talented younger casts that modern day cinema has ever seen assembled. If you leave in preconceived notions you have about Little Woman at the cinema door you will find yourself totally drawn into this worthy drama.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating: Little Women (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment LittleWomen Reviews: N/A

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The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Mistress America,’ ‘Freeheld,’ ‘Scouts Guide To The Zombie Apocalypse,’ ‘The Green Inferno,’ ‘Man Up,’ and ‘The Assassin’. This episode also contains interviews with Greta Gerwig, Ellen Page, Julianne Moore, Tye Sheridan, Sarah Dumont, Goran Spoljaric (The Priest), Neil Foley (Monster Fest), Owen Tilbury (BOFA), Nicholas Maksymow (RR Film Festival), Joe Bauer (Australiens) and Rita Artmann (Australiens).

Also  take a listen as the boys launch a brand new giveaway thanks to our friends at Icon Distrubution. Take a listen to see how you could win tickets to see Simon Pegg’s new film Absolutley Anything.

To listen to the show or can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Golden Globe Awards

The 2014 Golden Globe Award nominations are in, here they are:

 

Best Actor In A Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Matt Damon (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Chiwetel Ejiofor (Dancing On The Edge)
  • Idris Elba (Luther)
  • Al Pacino (Phil Spector)
  • Michael Douglas (Behind The Candelabra)

 

Best Actor In A Motion Picture, Drama

  • Chiwetel Ejiorfor (12 Years A Slave)
  • Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips)
  • Robert Redford (All Is Lost)
  • Idris Elba (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)

 

Best Actor In A Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

  • Bruce Dern (Nebraska)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (The Wolf Of Wall Street)
  • Christian Bale (American Hustle)
  • Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (Her)

 

Best Actor In A TV Series, Comedy

  • Jason Bateman (Arrested Development)
  • Don Cheadle (House Of Lies)
  • Michael J. Fox (The Michael J. Fox Show)
  • Jim Parsons (The Big Bang Theory)
  • Andy Samberg (Brooklyn Nine-Nine)

 

Best Actor In A TV Series, Drama

  • Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
  • Michael Sheen (Masters Of Sex)
  • Kevin Spacey (House Of Cards)
  • James Spader (The Black List)
  • Liev Schreiber (Ray Donovan)

 

Best Actress In A Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Helena Bonham Carter (Burton And Taylor)
  • Rebecca Ferguson (White Queen)
  • Jessica Lange (American Horror Story:Coven)
  • Helen Mirren (Phil Spector)
  • Elisabeth Moss (Top Of The Lake)

 

Best Actress In A Motion Picture, Drama

  • Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
  • Sandra Bullock (Gravity)
  • Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks)
  • Judi Dench (Philomena)
  • Kate Winslet (Labor Day)

 

Best Actress In A Motion Picture, Musical Or Comedy

  • Meryl Streep (August: Osage County)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Enough Said)
  • Amy Adams (American Hustle)
  • Julie Delpy (Before Midnight)
  • Greta Gerwig (Frances Ha)

 

Best Actress In A TV Series, Comedy

  • Zooey Deschanel (New Girl)
  • Lena Dunham (Girls)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Veep)
  • Amy Poehler (Parks And Recreation)
  • Edie Falco (Nurse Jackie)

 

Best Actress In A TV Series, Drama

  • Julianna Margulies (The Good Wife)
  • Kerry Washington (Scandal)
  • Tatiana Maslany (Orphan Black)
  • Robin Wright (House Of Cards)
  • Taylor Schilling (Orange Is The New Black)

 

Best Animated Feature Film

  • Frozen
  • The Croods
  • Despicable Me 2

 

Best Director – Motion Picture

  • Alfonso Cuaron (Gravity)
  • Steve McQueen (12 Years A Slave)
  • David O. Russell (American Hustle)
  • Paul Greengrass (Captain Phillips)
  • Alexander Payne (Nebraska)

 

Best Foreign Language Film

  • Blue Is The Warmest Color
  • The Past
  • The Hunt
  • The Wind Rises
  • The Great Beauty

 

Best Motion Picture, Drama

  • 12 Years A Slave
  • Gravity
  • Captain Phillips
  • Rush
  • Philomena

 

Best Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical

  • Nebraska
  • American Hustle
  • The Wolf Of Wall Street
  • Inside Llewyn Davis
  • Her

 

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

  • Steven Price (Gravity)
  • John Williams (The Book Thief)
  • Hans Zimmer (12 Years A Slave)
  • Alex Ebert (All Is Lost)
  • Alex Heffes (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)

 

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

  • Atlas (The Hunger Games: Catching Fire)
  • Let It Go (Frozen)
  • Ordinary Love (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)
  • Please Mr. Kennedy (Inside Llewyn Davis)
  • Sweeter Than Fiction (One Chance)

 

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

  • John Ridley (12 Years A Slave)
  • Bob Nelson (Nebraska)
  • Eric Warren Singer & David O. Russell (American Hustle)
  • Jeff Pope (Philomena)
  • Spike Jonze (Her)

 

Best Supporting Actor In A Motion Picture

  • Michael Fassbender (12 Years A Slave)
  • Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Bradley Cooper (American Hustle)
  • Daniel Bruhl (Rush)
  • Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips)

 

Best Supporting Actor In A Series, Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Rob Lowe (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Josh Charles (The Good Wife)
  • Aaron Paul (Breaking Bad)
  • Corey Stoll (House Of Cards)
  • Jon Voight (Ray Donovan)

 

Best Supporting Actress In A Motion Picture

  • Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years A Slave)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle)
  • Julia Roberts (August: Osage County)
  • June Squibb (Nebraska)
  • Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine)

 

Best Supporting Actress In A Series, Mini-Series Or TV Movie

  • Hayden Panettiere (Nashville)
  • Jacqueline Bisset (Dancing On The Edge)
  • Janet McTeer (White Queen)
  • Monica Potter (Parenthood)
  • Sofia Vergara (Modern Family)

 

Best TV Movie or Mini-Series

  • American Horror Story: Coven
  • Behind The Candelabra
  • Dancing On The Edge
  • Top Of The Lake
  • White Queen

 

Best TV Series, Comedy

  • The Big Bang Theory
  • Modern Family
  • Girls
  • Brooklyn 99
  • Parks And Recreation

 

Best TV Series, Drama

  • Breaking Bad
  • Downtown Abbey
  • House Of Cards
  • Masters Of Sex
  • The Good Wife

Frances Ha

Summary: Frances (Gerwig) lives in New York, but she doesn’t really have an apartment. Frances is an apprentice for a dance company, but she’s not really a dancer. Frances has a best friend named Sophie (Mickey Sumner, Sting’s daughter), but they aren’t really speaking anymore. Frances throws herself headlong into her dreams, even as their possible reality dwindles. Frances wants so much more than she has but lives her life with unaccountable joy and lightness. A modern comic fable that explores New York, friendship, class, ambition, failure, and redemption.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th August, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Noah Baumbach

Screenwriter: Noah Baumbach, Greta Gerwig

Cast: Charlotte d’Amboise (Colleen), Adam Driver (Lev), Michael Esper (Dan), Greta Gerwig (Frances), Grace Gumner (Rachel), Josh Hamilton (Andy), Patrick Heusinger (Patch), Maya Kazan (Caroline), Serena Longley (Abby), Justine Lupe (Nessa), Britta Phillips (Nadia), Juliet Rylance (Janelle), Mickey Sumner (Sophie), Dean Wareham (Spencer), Michael Zegen (Benji)

Runtime: 86 mins

Classification:MA15+

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘FRANCES HA’:

Greg King: Stars(2)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Frances Ha’ that is available on Episode #45 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Nick Gardener: Stars(2.5)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Frances Ha’ that is available on Episode #45 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Frances Ha (2012) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Frances Ha′: Please check Episode #45 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show for more reviews of ‘Frances Ha’.

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