Tagged: Hiro Kanagawa

Summary:  Set against the backdrop of the opioid epidemic, stories of an undercover cop, a professor, and a grieving mother collide in this dramatic thriller from writer/director Nicholas Jarecki.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 18th March 2021 (Australia), 26th February 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 5th March 2021 (USA)

Country: Canada, Belgium

Director: Nicholas Jarecki

Screenwriter: Nicholas Jarecki

Cast: Paul Aharani (Customs Inspector Fournier), Rodney Alexandre (Frankie), Benz Antoine (Detective Carson), Michel Aranov (Minas), Eric Bruneau (Guy Broussard), Bill Bryk (David Reimann), Charles Champagne (Cedric Beauville), Jay Chevery (Agent E. Thomas), Lily-Rose Depp (Emmie Kelly), Martin Donovan (Lawrence Morgan), Charles Ebbs (Franklin), Luke Evans (Dr. Bill Simons), Veronica Ferres (Dr. Meg Holmes), Tony Garrn (Sarah), Alex Gendreau (Davidson), Nouella Grimes (Dean Sharon Jones), Armie Hammer (Jake Kelly), Nicholas Jarecki (Stanley Foster), Marcel Jeannin (Harold Morgan), Daniel Jun (Jun), Hiro Kanagawa (Dr. Ishiyama), Kid Cudi (Ben Walker), Greg Kinnear (Dean Talbot), Mia Kirshner (Susan), Hugo B. Lefort (Billy – RCMP), Evangeline Lily (Claire Reimann), Duke Nicholson (Derrick Millebran), Gary Oldman (Dr. Tyrone Brower), Michelle Rodriguez (Supervisor Garrett), Noah Ruscica (Simon Gilcrest), Sara Sampaio (Ines), Frank Schorpion (Coach Vogel), Linda E. Smith (Anne), Kwasi Songui (Red), Ellora Torchia (Reeva), Admen Tsekhmen (Armen), Indira Varma (Madira Brower)

Running Time: 118 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

“Dreamland” Day06, Photo: Jan Thijs 2019

OUR CRISIS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Crisis Review:

I do love big action blockbusters as much as the next film fan, but I have to admit that I wish all blockbusters were like Crisis. This has everything that I want in a blockbuster – suspense, good acting and a script that has been well thought and plotted out by its screenwriters. It is also doesn’t need to have an explosion or a car chase in every scene to keep the interest going.

The well written script is the work of screenwriter/director Nicholas Jarecki (Arbitrage) who uses the backdrop of the opioid epidemic in the USA as a way for the stories of three characters living three very different lives to collide.

First there is Jake Kelly (Armie Hammer – The Lone Ranger) who is working undercover in a bid to bring down both one of the biggest importers and largest exporters of opioids coming across the US and Canadian border. While he is stepping along a very dangerous line he feels that he is now being rushed by his superior (Michelle Rodriguez – The Fast & The Furious) which may bring everything crashing down in the case.

Then there is Claire Reimann (Evangeline Lilly – Ant-Man) who is a recovering opioid addict who is just trying to get her life back on track when suddenly she leans that there is a possibility that her son’s disappearance may have something to do with the murky underworld of Detroit.

Last but certainly not least is Dr Tyrone Brower (Gary Oldman – The Dark Knight) a well-respected professor at a University that relies on grants and paid research work to keep going. When he and his students are asked to test a new addictive-free drug that a pharmaceutical company is planning on releasing they find it is not as addictive-free as the company believes. What happens when he confronts the company about his findings soon finds him under a threat that he could never have predicted.

The brilliance of Crisis all starts with the writing of Jarecki. I’ll admit that I became a fan of his after his amazing film Arbritage blew me away back in 2012. With that film Jarecki created an under-rated suspenseful thriller that brought out the best of its cast which included Richard Gere, Susan Sarandon and Brit Marling. With Crisis Jarecki recaptures that magic.

To say that Jarecki has created a slow-burn thriller with Crisis is an understatement. This isn’t a film fuelled by suspense through action, Jarecki and his cast can get just as much suspense out of scene with Kelly in a bar with a gangster or Brower sitting at a board-room meeting when his future is being determined then most director/screenwriters can get out massive robot fights or stunning car chases. As a director Jarecki also knows how to use his environment to his advantage and by teaming up with cinematographer Nicolas Bolduc (War Witch) he uses the snowscapes of Canada and Detroit to bring a harshness to the film that further enhances the bleakness told in the story.

Also like Arbritage is the fact that Jarecki’s screenplay here brings out the best in the film’s cast. For a long time I have seen Armie Hammer as a pretty-boy actor. While his looks lend him well to roles such as the ones he has had in The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and The Lone Ranger his acting range has been lacking. Here though Hammer shines as a drug agent in over his head – finally it seems like he found an acting role where he could showcase his acting talent sadly at a time when his career maybe at the crossroads.

The screenplay here also sees Evangeline Lilly steps up as a distraught mother trying to overcome her past demons with an emotional performance that once again reminds us of her acting abilities outside franchises. Also brilliant here is Gary Oldman, but then when isn’t he brilliant? Here he uses his theatrical training to great effect and he is sensational in some of the film’s more suspenseful scenes.

I should also point out though that I did find a flaw with this film. It did feel like the film tried to bring in too many characters. Characters like Kelly’s drug addicted sister Emmie (Lily-Rose Depp – Yoga Hosers) seem superfluous and just make the film run a little longer than it really should. All in all though Crisis is a must see thriller for cinema-goers out there that like a good slow-burn thriller.

A beautifully written script lends its hand to some great acting performances with a film that reminds us that often the line between pharmaceutical companies and drug dealers is often blurry.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Kyle McGrath’s Crisis Review:

Kyle’s rating Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Crisis (2021) on IMDb

Other Subculture Crisis Reviews:

Nil.

Trailer:

Godzilla

Summary: The world’s most famous monster is pitted against malevolent creatures who, bolstered by humanity’s scientific arrogance, threaten our very existence.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, Japan

Director: Gareth Edwards

Screenwriter: Max Borenstein, Dave Callaham (story)

Cast: CJ Adams (Young Ford), Juliette Binoche (Sandra Brody), Carson Bolde (Sam Brody), Garry Chalk (Stan Walsh), Bryan Cranston (Joe Brody), Jake Cunanan (Akio), James D. Dever (Captain Freeman), Catherine Lough Haggquist (PO #1 Martinez), Sally Hawkins (Vivienne Graham), Richard T. Jones (Captain Russell Hampton), Hiro Kanagawa (Hayato), Eric Keenleyside (Boyd), Anthony Konechny (Thach), Brian Markinson (Whelan), Gardiner Millar (Fitzgerald), Elizabeth Olsen (Elle Brody), Ty Olsson (Jainway), Victor Rasuk (Sergeant Tre Morales), Patrick Sabongui (Lieutenant Commander Marcus Waltz), Al Sapienza (Huddleston), David Strathairn (Admiral William Stenz), Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Ford Brody), Ken Watanabe (Dr. Ichiro Serizawa), Ken Yamamura (Takashi)

Runtime: 123 mins

Classification: M

OUR GODZILLA REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s Godzilla review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #79

Stars(3)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Godzilla review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #79

Stars(3)

David Griffiths:

Fans of Godzilla films want and deserve a good Godzilla film, after all the poor suffering souls have nothing but a bad taste in their mouth after the 1998 Matthew Broderick led disaster. Well now comes the 2014 update and on the surface it seems that in a rare oddity Hollywood has finally picked the right director to be at the helm of a major project. Anyone that can remember just how good Monsters was will attest to the fact that Gareth Edwards knows how to make a damn fine ‘monster flick.’

This time around we find Joe Brody (Bryan Cranston – Get A Job, Cold Comes The Night) alarmed at the seismic activity going on around the Japanese nuclear power plant where he works. To his surprise nobody seems to take him seriously and the result is a catastrophe that results in the death of many other workers including his wife.

Flash-forward to fifteen years later and Joe’s son Ford (Aaron Taylor-Johnson – Kick-Ass 2, Anna Karenina) is now a bomb expert in the military. He is also married to emergency room nurse, Elle (Elizabeth Olsen – Oldboy, In Secret) and has a young son that his military service takes him away from far to often. It is therefore understandable that he is frustrated when on a rare time at home he receives a call from Japanese authorities informing him that Joe has been arrested entering into a quarantined zone.

After bailing his father out Ford learns that his father believes that the authorities are keeping something secret inside the ‘zone’ and he wants to get inside to find his old data and to see what is going on. Reluctantly Ford follows his father and soon learns that experts, including Vivienne Graham (Sally Hawkins – The Double, Blue Jasmine) and Dr. Ichiro Serizawa (Ken Watanabe – Unforgiven, Inception) have been keeping a very large secret that is about to unleash itself onto the world.

It is easy to see Edwards’ handy work all over Godzilla. His monster sequences are well worth the price of admission, especially the ‘monster fights’ and at times he isn’t afraid to pull the focus away from these battles to show what the humans such as Ford are doing at that time. However while these sequences do look impressive as a whole Godzilla is held back from becoming a great film because of several reasons.

One of the major flaws of Godzilla is the characterisation. While you hardly go into a ‘monster flick’ expecting an epic back story for each character it is disappointing to find that a lot of the characters here in Godzilla are dangerously one dimensional. For example Dr. Serizawa is one of the more interesting characters although very little is learnt about him, then there is the massive under use of Elle, which results in the crime of seeing an award winning actress like Elizabeth Olsen become little more than scenery as she simple watches monsters go by with her mouth open like a Laughing Clown. The lack of characterization causes a problem later on in the film when the audience begins to realise that they really don’t care whether some characters survive the slaughter or not.

Of course though one of the most important things for a film like Godzilla however is what do the monsters actually look? Well Godzilla himself looks fine, Edwards’ team has actually done a pretty good throw back to the Godzilla of old. The same however cannot be said for the other Kaiju monsters that appear in the film, call me an old-fogey but somehow they seem just a little bit too metallic and robotic like for me. Their look makes them look very fake while on the other hand Godzilla’s natural look makes it almost believable that such creatures do live somewhere out there under the sea.

The decent storyline however does allow some of the actors to show their worth though. Bryan Cranston is given some moments to show his dramatic range, a welcome relief after the teaser footage they showed us a couple of months ago made it look like he might have been going for a comedic portrayal of his character, while Aaron Taylor-Johnson pulls on a serious face and actually shows that he may have what it takes to become an action hero in the future. As previously mentioned though some of the cast – especially Elizabeth Olsen and Ken Watanabe – are completely wasted in their one dimensional roles.

Godzilla is certainly far from a bad film. The good storyline and decent action sequences make it a worthy watch and Gareth Edwards should be congratulated for that, but sadly some elements of the script will still leave some serious film lovers wanting more.

 

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Godzilla (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Godzilla′: Nil

Trailer:

The Company You Keep

Summary: When a former member of the radical protest/terrorist organisation the Weather Underground (Sarandon) turns herself in to the FBI, Ben Shepard (LaBeouf), an aggressive young journalist, starts searching around for leads on the other members.

Before long Ben uncovers Jim Grant (Redford) a former Weatherman and a fugitive wanted for murder. After living for more than thirty years under an assumed identity as a civil rights lawyer and single father in New York, he must now go on the run.

With the FBI in hot pursuit and Shepard getting closer to discovering his secret, Grant sets off on a cross-country journey to track down the one person that can clear his name and allow him to go home to his daughter.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 18th April, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Robert Redford

Screenwriter: Lem Dobbs, Neil Gordon (novel)

Cast: Hamza Adam (Maulik Banjali), Julie Christie (Mimi Lurie), Chris Cooper (Daniel Sloan), Sam Elliott (Mac McLeod), Jackie Evancho (Isabel Grant), Brendan Gleeson (Henry Osborne), Terrence Howard (FBI Agent Cornelius), Richard Jenkins (Jed Lewis), Jon Johnson (Albany FBI Agent Johnson), Hiro Kanagawa (FBI Agent Kanagawa), Anna Kendrick (Diana), Matthew Kimbrough (Barnes), Shia LaBeouf (Ben Shepard), David Lewis (Albany FBI Agent Lewis), Donna Lysell (Eva Sloan), Brit Marling (Rebecca Osborne), Lochlyn Munro (FBI Agent Munro), Nick Nolte (Donal Fitzgerald), Robert Redford (Jim Grant/Nick Sloan), Gabriela Reynoso (Maria), Stephen Root (Billy Cusimano), Gabrielle Rose (Marianne Osborne), Susan Sarandon (Sharon Solarz), Stanley Tucci (Ray Fuller)

Runtime: 122 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Company You Keep’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘The Company You Keep’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Company You Keep′: Check Episode #28 (available 18th April, 2013) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘The Company You Keep’.

Rating: 2.5/5

IMDB Rating:The Company You Keep (2012) on IMDb