Tagged: Jacqui Hammerton

Summary:  Story of the rise and the fall of a young man in Paris who dreamed to be a writer and became a journalist.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  23rd June 2022 (Australia), 10 June 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: France, Belguim

Director: Xavier Giannoli

Screenwriter: Jacques Fieschi, Xavier Giannoli

Cast: Said Amadis (Matifat), Jeanne Balibar (Marquise d’Espard), Maryne Bertieaux (Eve), Candice Bouchet (Florine), Cecile de France (Louise de Bargeton), Isabelle de Hertogh (Berenice), Louis-Do de Lencqueasaing (Finot), Gerard Depardieu (Dauriat), Salome Dewaels (Coralie), Xavier Dolan (Nathan d’Anstazio), Jean-Marie Frin (Camusot), Eric Gueho (L’Argentin), Vincent Lacoste (Etienne Lousteau), Raphael Magnabosco (Antiochus), Andre Marcon (Baron du Chatelet), Eduard Michelon (Henri de Marsay), Jean-Paul Muel (Bargton), Jean-Francois Stevenin (Singali), Benjamin Voisin (Lucien Chandon/Lucien de Rubempre)

Running Time: 149 mins

Classification: M (Australia), TBC (USA)

OUR LOST ILLUSIONS REVIEWS

Alex First, David Griffiths, Jacqui Hammerton and Peter Krausz’s Minions: The Rise Of Gru Review:

Alex’s rating Out Of 5

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Jacqui’s rating Out Of 5

Peter’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Lost Illusions Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Summary:  The untold story of one twelve-year-old’s dream to become the world’s greatest supervillain.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  16th June 2022 (Australia), 30th June 2022 (Thailand), 1st July 2022 (UK), 1st July 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Kyle Balda, Brad Ableson, Jonathan del Val

Screenwriter: Brian Lynch, Matthew Fogel

Cast: Julie Andrews (Marlena Gru (voice)), Alan Arkin (Wild Knuckles (voice)), Russell Brand (Dr. Nefario (voice)), Steve Carell (Gru (voice)), Pierre Coffin (Kevin/Stuart/Bob/Minions (voice)), Taraji P. Henson (Belle Bottom (voice)), Lucy Lawless (Nunchuk (voice)), Dolph Lundgren (Svengeance (voice)), RZA (Biker (voice)), Danny Trejo (Stronghold (voice)), Jean-Claude Van Damme (Jean Clawed (voice)), Michelle Yeoh (Master Chow (voice))

Running Time: 87 mins

Classification: PG (Australia), TBC (Thailand), U (UK), PG (USA)

OUR MINIONS: THE RISE OF GRU REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Minions: The Rise Of Gru Review:

Chances are if you are a parent you have heard the Minions – those cute yellow little creatures that rarely  say things that the average human can understandable  – except of course unless that word is “BANANAS!!!”

It is hard to believe that these cute little guys have been in our lives for 12 years now. Of course they first appeared in Despicable Me way back 2010 and since then have appeared in two more Despicable Me films as well as their own spin-off feature film and a number of shorts. The one thing that cinema audiences have always been guaranteed across all of those films is that they would be funny and entertaining for the whole family.

Now the Minions and their criminal over-lord Gru (Steve Carrell – The 40-Year Old Virgin) return in Minions: The Rise Of Gru. This time around directors Kyle Balda (The Lorax), Brad Ableson (Minions: Holiday Special) and Jonathan del Val (The Secret Life Of Pets 2) take fans of the franchise right back to the beginning to show how Gru and his team of Minions not only first met but how their journey towards world domination started.

The film goes back to a pre-teen Gru that idolises a group of super-villains led by the notorious Belle Bottom (Taraji P. Henson – Hidden Figures) and hopes to become a villain himself one day. His dreams seem to be coming true when a vacancy opens up within The Vicious 6 and Gru is selected for a job interview with them. However at the interview he learns that the vacancy has been because of the disappearance of his favourite member, Wild Knuckles (Alan Arkin – Argo). Not only that but Belle Bottom and the remaining super-villains laugh at him for being a child.

Determined to prove that he is a villain Gru steals a valuable, ancient Chinese artefact while the villains are distracted. His plan is to take it back in a few days to show his worth to Belle Bottom however that plan fails when one of the over-zealous Minions loses the artefact which means once the group hunt down Gru is life is at risk. Soon the Minions find themselves on a journey to not only find the stone but to save Gru’s life.

Just like the other films that have built up the Minions’ world the first thing that hits you with this film is just how much fun it is. The screenwriting team, made up of Brian Lynch (Puss In Boots) and Matthew Fogel (The Lego Movie 2), has made sure that this is the perfect family film as it is the type of film that will appeal to both parents and children alike.

The key to that working is the fact that not only is the film set in the 1970s but it contains the same kind of humour and storyline that generations of animation fans have enjoyed. While many modern day animated films try to be too modern Minions: The Rise Of Gru uses all of the same tropes of old-school cartoons like The Smurfs, The Jetsons and The Flintstones. Just like those cartoons this film uses all the elements of comedy to get a laugh – from witty one liners right through to outrageously funny slapstick.

Likewise it doesn’t do anything too fancy with the plot. This is a genuine old-school good versus evil storyline. The difference being of course that Gru despite being the audience’s hero is also kind of evil. Remarkably even that element of the film works exceptionally well and true fans of the franchise will also notice that so many jigsaw pieces from right across the series fall into place with this film. From Gru first meeting Dr. Nefario (Russell Brand – Arthur) through to Gru first hiring the Minions it is all revealed and explained this time around.

The other thing that makes Minions: The Rise Of Gru so special to watch is that the all the adventures that Gru and the Minions have together in this film are made special by the fact that the characters around them are voiced by an avalanche of stars that include Jean-Claude Van Damme, Michelle Yeoh, Dolph Lundgren, Lucy Lawless, Danny Trejo, RZA and Julie Andrews, in fact keep an ear out for Yeoh’s character because Master Chow absolutely steals the show.

If you are looking for the perfect film for the entire family then go no further than Minions: The Rise Of Gru. This is a very special animated film that will be lapped up by fans of the franchise and is an absolute must see.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Alex First, Jacqui Hammerton and Peter Krausz’s Minions: The Rise Of Gru Review:

Alex’s rating Out Of 5

Jacqui’s rating Out Of 5

Peter’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Minions: Rise Of Gru Reviews:

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Trailer:

Summary:  While spending years attempting to return home, marooned Space Ranger Buzz Lightyear encounters an army of ruthless robots commanded by Zurg who are attempting to steal his fuel source.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  16th June 2022 (Australia), 16th June 2022 (Thailand), 17th June 2022 (UK), 17th June 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Angus MacLane

Screenwriter: Jason Headley, Angus MacLane

Cast: Uzo Aduba (Alisha Hawthorne (voice)), James Brolin (Zurg (voice)), Chris Evans (Buzz Lightyear (voice)), Bill Hader (Featheringhamstan (voice)), Keira Hairston (Young Izzy), Angus MacLane (ERIC/DERIC & Zyclops (voice)), Mary McDonald-Lewis (I.V.A.N. (voice)), Keke Palmer (Izzy Hawthorne (voice)), Efren Ramirez (Airman Diaz (voice)), Peter Sohn (SOX (voice)), Dale Soules (Darby Steel (voice)), Taika Waititi (Mo Morrison (voice)), Isiah Whitlock (Commander Burnside (voice))

Running Time: 100 mins

Classification: PG (Australia), G (Thailand), PG (UK), PG (USA)

OUR LIGHTYEAR REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Lightyear Review:

Lightyear is perhaps the origin story that you never knew you needed. When you consider that the now famous Buzz Lightyear was in fact one of the original toys in the Toy Story you would have to wonder how Disney and Pixar could make an origins story for him. But as the class saying goes where there is a will there is a way and the result has been Lightyear a film that this week we have learnt has become one of the most controversial films of 2022.

Directed and written by Angus MacLane (Finding Dory) Lightyear is supposedly the film that Andy, the main character from Toy Story, had just watched way back in 1995 when he asked his mother to buy the Buzz Lightyear toy for him.

That film’s story finds Buzz (voiced by Chris Evans – The Avengers) proudly working as a Space Ranger alongside his partner Alisha Hawthorne (Uzo Aduba – Mrs. America) as they investigate a recently discovered planet. However, when they find themselves being attacked and then crash-land as they try to escape themselves and their crew find themselves stranded.

In the years that follow Alisha tries to build a civilisation on the planet while Buzz tries to experiment with a number of ways to leave the planet. That eventually leads to him having to lead a rag-tag group of ‘space rangers’, that includes the brave but unsure Izzy Hawthorne (Keke Palmer – Hustlers), the criminally minded Darby Steel (Dale Soules – The Messenger), the nervous and out of his depth Mo Morrison (Taika Waititi – JoJo Rabbit) and a robot cat called SOX (Peter Sohn – Monsters University) in a bid to protect the planet from a ruthless invader named Zurg (James Brolin – Traffic).

Lightyear is kind of a strange film. It seems like it should be a film for children but a lot of the storyline and themes seem like it has taken a leaf out of the Anime playbook and is aimed for an older audience. There is of course the same sex kiss between Alisha and her partner but even that aside the dialogue between the characters seems to be aimed at an older audience while the time travel element of the film will go right over the head of most younger audience members.

In fact to be honest the whole time travel story that pops up three-quarters of the way into the film seems very redundant. First of all it is the simplicity of the first half of the movie that makes it warm to its audience and the time travel twist not only completely ruins that but it falls on its own face and makes no sense when you really think about it. It actually leaves a bit of a sour taste in the mouth of its audience which is a bit of shame because the first half of the film is a sweet delight.

The film actually works better when it is a simple fight for survival by the main characters. Buzz and the team that surrounds him and all likable, okay SOX actually steals the show and is a merchandise dream, and as an audience you not only find yourself rooting for them – you actually do like them. Each character has their own traits that make them feel special and McLane and Jason Headey’s (Onward) screenplay allows for some witty dialogue that provides laughs amongst the action ensuring that the first half of the film is a pleasurable experience.

The film is so intriguing at times that you are willing to overlook that even though the film was supposed to have been made in 1995 its animation looks nothing like the cartoons of the 90s but it is virtually impossible to overlook the poor plot turn as it becomes a time travel movie with a story that makes no sense. The best way to go into this film is to expect a finale that is going to be a bit of a fizzer.

Lightyear is well worth a glance if you a big fan of the Toy Story franchise but you do quickly realise that it could have been a lot better. The fact that the first part of the film is so much fun and action packed makes you wonder why the creative team went in a whole different direction for the later parts. It ends up being an okay film with a really disappointing finale.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Alex First, Jacqui Hammerton and Peter Krausz’s Lightyear Review:

Alex’s rating Out Of 5

Jacqui’s rating Out Of 5

Peter’s rating Out Of 5

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You can read our review of Lightyear that appeared in The Phuket News right here – https://www.thephuketnews.com/lightyear-a-real-buzz-for-fans-84606.php

Trailer:

Summary:  Doctor Strange teams uFrom his childhood in Tupelo, Mississippi to his rise to stardom starting in Memphis, Tennessee and his conquering of Las Vegas, Nevada, Elvis Presley becomes the first rock ‘n roll star and changes the world with his music.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  23rd June 2022 (Australia), 23rd June 2022 (Thailand), 24th June 2022 (UK), 24th June 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: Australia, USA

Director: Baz Luhrman

Screenwriter: Baz Luhrman, Sam Bromell, Craig Pearce, Jeremy Doner

Cast: Charles Allen (Reverend Brewster), Princess Mariama Andrews (Sweet Inspirations – Cissy), Gad Banza (Shake Rag Friend – Doc), Natasha Bassett (Dixie Locke), Natalie Bassingthwaighte (Dee Stanley), Nicholas Bell (Senator Eastland), Mike Bingaman (Sonny West), Liz Blackett (Grandma Dodger), Luke Bracey (Jerry Schilling), Sharon Brooks (Sweet Inspirations – Sylvia), Miles Burton (Shake Rag Friend – Bobby), Austin Butler (Elvis), Gary Clark Jr. (Arthur ‘Big Boy’ Crudup), Sandro Colarelli (Tony Goochera), Josie Cross (Glenda), Elizabeth Cullen (Natalie – Motel Girl), Gareth Davies (Bones Howe), Olivia DeJonge (Priscilla), Hilton Hyppolite Denis (Claude Thompson), Shonka Dukureh (Big Mama Thornton/Pentecostal Singer), Adam Dunn (Bill Black), Leon Ford (Tom Diskin), Miranda Frangou (Nell), Charles Grounds (Billy Smith), Tom Hanks (Colonel Tom Parker), Kelvin Harrison Jr. (B.B. King), Chaydon Jay (Young Elvis), ALyson Joyce (Marie Knight), Jenna Kenney (Barbara Hearn), Aristene Kisando (Sweet Inspirations – Myrna), Christian Kisando (Shake Rag Friend – Smoky), Alex Knight (Ron Tutt), Alton Mason (Little Richard), Christian McCarty (Red West), Josh McConville (Sam Phillips), Jack McGirr (Tommy), Senayt Mebrahtu (Sweet Inspirations – Estelle), Ange Miliken (Madam Z), Dacre Montgomery (Steve Binder), Andrea Moor (Nurse Tish), Cle Morgan (Mahalia Jackson), John Mukristayo (Jimmy), Kate Mulvany (Marion Keisker), Tony Nixon (Dr. Nick), Sarah Ogden (Mrs. Eastland), Anthony Phelan (Meyer Kohn), Greg Powell (Milton Berle), Alex Radu (George Klein), Terepai Richmond (DJ Fontana), Richard Roxburgh (Vernon), Patrick Shearer (DJ Dewey Phillips), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Jimmie Rodgers Snow), Xavier Samuel (Scotty Moore), Christopher Sommers (Horace Logan), Helen Thomson (Gladys), Melina Vidler (Barbara), David Wenham (Hank Snow), Katrina West (Ann Eastland), Mark Leonard Winter (Tom Hulett), Yola (Sister Rosetta Tharpe)

Running Time: 149 mins

Classification: M (Australia), G (Thailand), 12-A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR ELVIS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Elvis Review:

Nobody makes films like Australian director Baz Luhrmann. Luhrmann’s own style of filmmaking was there for all to see with his 90s hit Strictly Moulin. From there he went from strength to strength wowing audiences with his own take on the classic Shakespearian tale of Romeo & Juliet and then of course came the gem in his crown – the visually spectacular Moulin Rouge. It seems the only blemish in Luhrmann’s career to date was the sub-standard Australia that made the country it was named after cringe.

When you think of the loud music and the glitz and glamour that Luhrmann loads his movies with you soon realise that he is the perfect filmmaker to bring the story of the great Elvis Presley to the big screen. Presley like Luhrmann was a glitzy showman who shone brightest when the spotlight was him and to the former’s credit he captures all that and more with his latest epic – Elvis.

Told through the eyes of Presley’s (Austin Butler – Arrow) long-time manager Colonel Tom Parker (Tom Hanks – Castaway) Elvis follows Presley’s career right from the earliest days when he performed to make money for his parents, Vernon (Richard Roxburgh – Van Helsing) and Gladys (Helen Thomson – Kangaroo Jack) through to Parker signing a long term deal that would see him perform some of his most energetic shows on the Vegas.

Along the way we see the young Presley working with musicians such as Little Richard (first time actor Alton Mason) who helped form his now famous sound and also his more personal moments especially as his relationship with Priscilla (Olivia DeJonge – Better Watch Out) begun to blossom.

Most will go into Elvis expecting a movie that is full of glitz and glam but lacks substance, in reality though nothing is further than the truth. Luhrmann surprisingly digs deep into the live of Elvis Presley and touches on some of the darker moments and events that happened throughout his career.  Topics such as racist politicians and law enforcement officers targeting Elvis during the early days of his career are explored in great depth and ground the film, it is a rarity to see Luhrmann tackle serious subjects like this in his films but he shows here that he is more than capable of it.

Likewise despite the fact the film is told through the eyes of Parker Luhrmann allows the film to explore many of the allegations brought against him. Early on Parker while acting as narrator defends himself saying he never did anything to harm Elvis yet later we see him recounting times when he pushed the man to the limit of exhaustion fuelling his drug habit while making selfish decisions that would benefit him but damage the career of the man he supposedly cared for.

Perhaps Luhrmann’s hand on the film really comes to light though during Presley’s Vegas years. The flashy neon lights and the fast pace of Las Vegas are perfect fodder for Luhrmann’s style of filmmaking and the scenes of Elvis on stage in Vegas are some of the highlights of the film – especially given that Austin Butler’s performance is so believable that it feels like you are watching archival footage.

In fact it probably isn’t out of place to suggest that Butler could easily earn an Oscar nomination for this film. His performance here is faultless as he literally seems to become Elvis. His singing voice mimics the King to a tee what his dancing ability is off the charts. When you mix that with his fine acting performance that takes him through all the emotions what you see here is one of the best acting performances of 2022.

This is also one of Tom Hanks finest acting performances to date, and that is saying something given the calibre of Hanks’ previous roles. He seems to embrace being able to play Parker as a type of villain and his performance is one of the most memorable things from the film. Likewise Olivia DeJone is stunning at Priscilla, she may have limited screen time but she makes use of what she does have.

Elvis far exceeds the expectations that many will have from it. The serious tone of the film is a huge step up and a surprise from Luhrmann. He keeps control of this film remarkably well knowing the right times to unleash his glitzy brilliance and when to hold it back for some of the films more serious moments. Together Luhrmann, Butler and Hanks have created something very special, something that is one of the best films of the year.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Alex First, Greg King, Jacqui Hammerton and Peter Krausz’s Elvis Review:

Alex’s rating Out Of 5

Greg’s rating Out Of 5

Jacqui’s rating Out Of 5

Peter’s rating Out Of 5

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N/A

Trailer:

Summary:  Two writers are thrown together on a whirlwind book tour of Mexico.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  10th March 2022 (Australia), 17th March 2022 (Thailand)

VOD Release Dates: 4th February 2022 (USA)

Country: Mexico, UK

Director: Analeine Cal y Mayor

Screenwriter: Analeine Cal y Mayor, David Quantick

Cast: Fernando Becerril (Max Rodriguez), Alejandro Bracho (Julio – Event Organiser), Sam Claflin (Henry Copper), Antonio Clarke (Allison), Laura de Ita (Rosa – Interviewer), Veronica Echegui (Maria Rodriguez), Giovani Florido (Miguel), Ruy Gaytan (Diego), Edwardo Gurrola (Veronica), Daniela Luque (Martha), Remmie Milner (Jill – Bookshop Owner), Melissa Pino (Helena), Lucy Punch (Jen Spencer), Horacio Garcia Rojas (Antonio), Sofia Sisniega (Bertriz – TV Host), Galya Vidal (Francisca – Interviewer), Horacio Villabolos (Pedro)

Running Time: 106 mins

Classification: M (Australia), TBC (Thailand), 12 (UK)

OUR BOOK OF LOVE REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Book Of Love Review:

Love is universal! Although the type of universal love that Hollywood has been talking about in romantic comedies over the years has often been pretty unrealistic – honestly when has anyone ever landed in an different country and found everybody, including the person they like, all seem to speak one language. That finally has been addressed in brand new romantic comedy Book Of Love.

Directed by Analeleine Cal y Mayor (Treading Water) the film revolves around a young British writer named Henry Copper (Sam Claflin – Me Before You). Henry has written a romance book that he loves, but it seems like he is the only one because the book is not selling largely due to the lack of ‘sex’ in it. Despite the feedback Henry is still convinced that romance and sex should never be mixed together.

With the book virtually being given away in bookstores in the UK Henry finds himself called into the offices of his publisher, Jen Spencer (Lucy Punch – Into The Woods), where he is expecting to be fired. Instead though he is told that he is book has become a bestseller in Mexico and he must leave straightaway for a whirlwind press tour.

On arrival in Mexico Henry discovers that he is a superstar and suddenly he must have to deal with things such as social media and fans everywhere he goes. However, after meeting Maria Rodriguez (Veronica Echegui – Trust), and seeing how worked up the people become that have read his novel Henry soon begins to realise that the translation of his novel maybe a little different to the English version.

Book Of Love does have its moments and to be honest the characters of Henry and Maria are very, very likable but the thing that sets this film apart from most other romantic comedies is the fact that the director and screenwriter David Quantick (Veep) have attempted to make the film so natural that it is in both English and Spanish. When Henry arrives in Mexico he quickly realises that there are very few people that he can actually converse. So important is that to the plot of the film it becomes a central theme of the film and also provides a great deal of laughs as Henry tries to converse with people including Maria’s son.

While there is a lot to like about Book Of Love, including some of its witty dialogue, the film does have its flaws. There are moments that are so cheesy you will groan, wait until you see the poor acting when Maria’s ex-husband, Antonio (Horacio Garcia Rojas – Narcos: Mexico), is hit in the head with a book, and of course if you have seen enough of these films you will be able to pick the ending off a mile away.

But the film is still a fun ride as it plays out to get to that ending. As was mentioned previously both Henry and Maria are likable characters and you find yourself wanting to see them get together from the first moment they meet.

Quantick’s screenplay also surrounds the two with interesting enough characters. Antonio is a clichéd villain but still a villain that you will hate. Then there is Henry’s Mexican publisher who again is a walking cliché but still manages to pull the laughs. Mainly though the likable parts of this film play out between Henry and Maria and Henry and Maria’s young son – and it those moments throughout the film that keep the audience interested. And for the laughs – well they do come frequently during the film but are mainly from the many, many Mexican fans that will do or say anything to spend time with Henry.

Book Of Love does have its flaws but for the most part it remains a likable film. The filmmakers behind it need to be congratulated for having the courage to create a bilingual film because that in itself brings a realism to this film that makes it lovable.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Alex First, Greg King, Jacqui Hammerton and Peter Krausz’s Book Of Love Review:

Alex’s rating Out Of 5

Greg’s rating Out Of 5

Jacqui’s rating Out Of 5

Peter’s rating Out Of 5

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Trailer:

JACQUI HAMMERTON

Jacqui Hammerton is a well respected film reviewer and writer. She is currently one of the presenters on First On Film & Entertainment which can be heard on J-Air on Sunday morning at 11am.

Currently Jacqui First has 5 Film review on Subculture Entertainment

Currently Jacqui First has 1 Theatre review on Subculture Entertainment