Tagged: Kathryn Hahn

A new TV spot airs tonight featuring Marvel Studios’ upcoming new Disney+ series “WandaVision,” a blend of classic television and the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

The spot reveals an original theme song written by Oscar®-winning songwriters Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez (“Frozen”), who penned unique songs for several episodes, spanning from the 1950s to the early 2000s.

“‘WandaVision’ is such a cool, strange, one-of-a-kind project,” says Lopez.

“When the director, Matt Shakman—an old friend from my college days—pitched it to us, we didn’t have to think about it. We loved the bright feeling of American sitcoms mixed with the deep sense of unease the story had, and it was a really inviting challenge to help set that tone.”

Adds Anderson-Lopez, “I grew up in the ’80s watching shows from every decade on the networks all day long. Episodes from ‘I Love Lucy,’ ‘Brady Bunch’ and ‘Family Ties’ shaped who I am and how I move through the world. So this project was a dream come true.”

“WandaVision,” the first Marvel Studios series created exclusively for Disney+, stars Elizabeth Olsen as Wanda Maximoff, Paul Bettany as Vision, Kathryn Hahn as Agnes, and Teyonah Parris as Monica Rambeau, who was introduced to audiences in “Captain Marvel.” Kat Dennings will reprise her role as Darcy from “Thor” and “Thor: The Dark World,” and Randall Park will reprise his role as Jimmy Woo from “Ant-Man and The Wasp.” 

Marvel Studios’ “WandaVision” is a blend of classic television and the Marvel Cinematic Universe in which Wanda Maximoff and Vision—two super-powered beings living idealized suburban lives—begin to suspect that everything is not as it seems. The series is directed by Matt Shakman with Jac Schaeffer as head writer. Composer is Christophe Beck, and theme (for certain episodes) is by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez

Featuring nine episodes, “WandaVision” kicks off on Disney+ on January 15, 2021.

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This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Sausage Party,’ ‘Down Under,’ ‘Bad Moms,’  and ‘Louder Than Bombs’. This episode also contains interviews with Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell, Kathryn Hahn, Abe Forsythe and Rosemary Myers (‘Girl Asleep’).

Also make sure you listen to this week’s show for your chance to win a copy of ‘Fifty Shades Of Black’ on DVD thanks to our good  friends at EOne Entertainment. For your chance to win simple listen to the show and then send your answer to this week’s question via private message to either our Facebook or Twitter pages.

You can listen to The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show or download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

The Visit

Summary: Young filmmaker Becca (Olivia DeJonge) and her wannabe rapper brother Tyler (Ben Oxenbould) decide to visit their Nana (Deanna Dunagan) and Pop Pop (Peter McRobbie) for the first time when their mother (Kathryn Hahn) decides to take some time out and go on a cruise.

At first the pair are excited about their visit and Becca decides that the trip would make a good subject for a documentary. However, things start to become creepy for the two when their grandparents start acting strange and they are forbidden to leave their bedrooms after bedtime. Is something sinister occurring?

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th September 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: M. Night Shyamalan

Screenwriter: M. Night Syamalan

Cast: Jorge Cordova (Miguel), Patch Darragh (Dr. Sam), Olivia DeJonge (Becca), Deana Dunagan (Nana), Kathryn Hahn (Mom), Ocean James (Young Becca), Benjamin Kanes (Dad), Celia Keenan-Bolger (Stacey), Shelby Lackman (J. Smith), Peter McRobbie (Pop Pop), Seamus Moroney (Young Tyler), Ed Oxenbould (Tyler)

Runtime: 94 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR THE VISIT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

There is no doubt about it the once promising career of filmmaker M. Night Shyamalan is on the rocks. He burst onto the scene with The Sixth Sense but then came average films like The Happening which were quickly followed by some of the worst movies ever made – The Last Airbender and After Earth. Well it seems as though Shyamalan listened to the public and the critics because he has decided to do something very different with his latest film The Visit. He goes right back to the drawing board and has decided to make a low budget film with a cast of virtual unknowns.

Now that might be enough to make some people groan, but it seems to be the right decision for Shyamalan as returning to  the basic style of filmmaking has meant that he has had to rely on a good script to impress the audience rather than millions of dollars worth of special effects. And I’ll admit it to my surprise he manages to pull it off very well with a film that has now even seemed to win horror fans… some of the hardest film lovers to impress.

Early on The Visit did have me wondering what the hell I had walked into as the character Tyler started to rap… yes rap like a poor man’s Eminem. After a while though I realised that Shyamalan had just inserted this to get some laughs from the audience or even to make this film a little bit different, no instead this was something that had been lacking from his films for quite a while – characterisation. With the important aspect of a screenplay welcomed back Shymalan then takes his audience on a journey that provides a more than enough scares along the way, with the odd chuckle and then delivers its payload with a twist that actually drew sounds of amazement and fear out of the audience I was sitting with. Yes Shymalan has not only managed to deliver a horror with a mix of comedy, but also made that a damn good horror film at the same time.

It does feel that The Visit’s fairytale style story allows Shyamalan to take a journey make to his childhood and he mostly seems to do this through the character of Becca who you can easily imagine is the female version of what the wannabe-filmmaker teenage Shymalan would have been like. Maybe it’s because of this personal touch or perhaps because the film actually works but this was one time when the ‘found footage’ style of filmmaking didn’t make me want to leave the cinema.

Of course one of the dangers of making a low budget film with no names acting is that the acting is going to be below par but that certainly isn’t the case here. Peter McRobbie and Deanna Dunagan bring a brilliant level of creepiness to this film while the young Australian stars Ed Oxenbould and Olivia DeJonge put in mature performances well above their ages. This is something that fans of Australian television series Puberty Blues have come to expect from Oxenbould and he continue to shape himself to be one of the big international stars of the future.

Well its official people, it has taken a few bombs along the way but M. Night Shyamalan is back with one of the most impressive horror flicks of the year. The back to basics storytelling approach that Shyamalan takes with The Visit results in a horror flick with an amazing twist that is guaranteed to provide a few scares for its audience.

 

Stars(3.5)

 

The following is David Griffiths’ second The Visit review which originally appeared in Heavy Magazine

While it may have been bombarded by the amount of blockbusters that have been released recently new horror thriller The Visit is actually a film that has a lot riding on it – the most important thing being the career of its writer/director M. Night Shyamalan. Shymalan was once the talk of Hollywood thanks to the fact that his film The Sixth Sense was classed as a classic, but since then Shyamalan has never reached those heights again and his past two films The Last Airbender and After Earth saw him get crucified by critics and film lovers so badly he now needs a hit film to get some credibility back.

The Visit is a brave choice for Shymalan. It has a small budget, stars virtual no-names and decides to mix comedy and horror together – two genres that sometimes meet to create little more than a car crash. Shymalan’s The Visit presents itself like a fairytale. A mother (Kathryn Hahn – We’re The Millers) reluctantly allows her children, budding filmmaker Becca (Olivia DeJonge – The Sisterhood Of Night) and wannabe rapper Tyler (Ed Oxenbould – Puberty Blues), to go and stay with her estranged parents. But then when the two kids arrive they find that Nana (Deanna Dunagan – Have A Little Faith) and Pop Pop’s (Peter McRobbie – Lincoln) behavior is strange to say the least.

The great news horror fan is that The Visit sees Shymalan back at his creepy best. He takes some huge gambles with this film and luckily they all pay off. Sure early on when young Tyler bursts into some pretty ordinary rapping you might groan but stick with it because that is just setting up his character and soon you find yourself embedded in an old style horror film that actually has enough scares to have you jumping in your seat. Oh and there is one hell of a twist that will leave you screaming WTF!!! Yes, it is such a surprise you will actually say it out loud.

Even the fact that this is largely a ‘found footage’ film doesn’t hold it back and for once a screenplay actually manages to include a few humorous parts into what is actually a pretty frightening horror film. Young stars Olivia DeJone and Ed Oxenbould do Australia proud and once again cinema fans can start to get excited about a film with the name M. Night Symalan attached to it.

 

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full The Visit review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Nick Gardener:

 

You can hear Nick’s full The Visit review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147

 

Stars(3.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  The Visit (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment The Visit reviews: You can listen to our full The Visit  review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147. You can also read our The Vist review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

This Is Where I Leave You

Summary: A Jewish family that isn’t used to observing their faith’s traditions is forced to fulfill their father’s final wish and sit Shivah together and confront their problems.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Shawn Levy

Screenwriter: Jonathan Tropper

Cast: Michael Barra (Ollie), Jason Bateman (Judd Altman), Barbara Bleier (Trish), Connie Britton (Tracy Sullivan), Carly Brooke (Chelsea), Rose Byrne (Penny Moore), Cantor Mia Fram Davidson (Cantor), Adam Driver (Phillip Altman), Oakes Fegley (Young Judd), Tina Fey (Wendy Altman), Jane Fonda (Hillary Altman), Michael Bryan French (Dr. Rausch), Kathryn Hahn (Annie Altman), Cade Lappin (Cole), Aaron Lazar (Barry Weissman), Beth Leavel (Renee), Debra Monk (Linda Callen), Olivia Oguma (Shelby), Timothy Olyphant (Hory Callen), Lance Roberts (Calvin), Ben Schwartz (Rabbi Charles Grodner (Boner)), Carolyn Seiff (Mrs. Applebaum), Dax Shepard (Wade Beaufort), Abigail Spencer (Quinn Altman), Cheryl Stern (Lois), Corey Stoll (Paul Altman), Will Swenson (Younger Mort), Gerry Vichi (Uncle Joe)

Runtime: 103 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s This Is Where I Leave You review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(2.5)

 

David Griffiths:

Jason Bateman has been a bit of a comedic golden path just recently. It seems every comedy film that he has touched has turned to box office gold with the likes of Due Date and Horrible Bosses leading the way. But you can only wonder whether he has gone skidding of that path badly with This Is Where I Leave You a film that manages to pack together a stellar ensemble cast… but forgets that a film just can’t work if you overcrowd it with so many characters that people can’t keep track of who is who.

Based on the hit novel by Jonathan Tropper (who also pens the screenplay here) This Is Where I Leave You sees one of life’s losers Judd Altman’s (Jason Bateman) life take a turn for a new low, when he comes home from work to find his wife in bed with his egotistical boss, Wade (Dax Shepard).

Then life delivers another blow to Judd when he learns that his father has died. While at the funeral Judd and his siblings learn from their mother, Hillary (Jane Fonda) that their father’s dying wish was that they all turn back to their Jewish roots and return home to their mother for a week. So soon Judd, Wendy (Tina Fey), Phillip (Adam Driver) and Paul (Corey Stoll) are all back under the roof and digging up painful memories from the past that puts them all on edge. Judd is also faced with the new dilemma of does he finally decide to take a risk in his life and turn his back on his cheating wife and take a chance with his friend from High School Penny Moore (Rose Byrne).

On paper This Is Where I Leave You should be a brilliant film. The all star comedic cast should suggest that this film should glitter with comedy gold while the fact that it is based on a hit novel means the film should have a ready made audience. But perhaps the biggest problem here is that the novel has been adapted for the screen by the same man who penned the novel in the first place, a practice that never really works because an author treats his novel like a baby and never wants to cut a thing out of it. As a result This Is Where I Leave You is a film that has just too many characters and is packed absolutely full of subplots.

The result is an over-long film that loses its audience at times with scenes that don’t need to be there and flat spots that end up overshadowing the good comedic moments such as the boys smoking a joint in the synagogue causing mayhem to ensue. Then there are also the comedy moments that do nothing else but make you groan like Wade’s car being overturned by a bunch of steroid abusing idiots.

The other major problem with having so many characters piled into the film is that it means that no actor really ever gets a chance to shine. Jason Bateman just seems to breeze through this film with no effort whatsoever while people such as Rose Byrne and Connie Britton are completely wasted in roles that could have really been filled by nobodies.

Likewise the comedic skills of Jane Fonda and Tina Fey are completely stunted as the weak script rarely gives them a chance to impress or even get a chuckle out of their audience. Even Timothy Olyphant and Dax Shepard are in stunted roles while Adam Driver manages to buck the trend a little by bringing some skills to the table as he portrays the juvenile yet unhappy playboy, Phillip.

This Is Where I Leave You should have been an interesting comedic drama that explored the world of a family in turmoil. With the cast assembled it should have been a beautifully delivered character drama but all because of one weak script it ends up becoming a bit of a mess. The over indulgence of characters means that nobody ever gets a chance to shine while too many opportunities for a good laugh fall by the wayside. Sadly This Is Where I Leave You will be jotted down as one of the disappointments of 2014.

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: This Is Where I Leave You (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘This Is Where I Leave You′: For our full This Is Where I Leave You review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #102 . You can also check Dave’s This Is Where I Leave You review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty

Summary: A timid magazine photo manager who lives life vicariously through daydreams embarks on a true-life adventure when a negative goes missing.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Ben Stiller

Screenwriter: Steve Conrad, James Thurber (short story)

Cast: Marcus Antturi (Rich Melhoff), Jon Daly (Tim Naughton), Craig Dourmashkin (Curtis), Paul Fitzgerald (Don Proctor), Kathryn Hahn (Odessa Mitty), Terrence Bernie Hines (Gary Mannheim), Kai Lennox (Phil Melhoff), Shirley MacLaine (Edna Mitty), Adrian Martinez (Hernando), Nicole Neuman (Rachel), Conan O’Brien (himself), Patton Oswalt (Todd Maher), Sean Penn (Sean O’Connell), Andy Richter (himself), Adam Scott (Ted Hendricks), Ben Stiller (Walter Mitty), Kristen Wiig (Cheryl Melhoff)

Runtime: 114 mins

Classification:PG

OUR THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY REVIEWS & RATINGS

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

David Griffiths:

Everybody knows Ben Stiller has one of modern days’ top comedic actors. What many don’t realise though is that whenever Stiller had decided to pull on the director’s cap that success has always followed. His debut directional effort ‘Reality Bites’ drew plenty of applause, while his follow ups ‘The Cable Guy,’ ‘Zoolander’ and ‘Tropic Thunder’ were all massive commercial successes.

Now Stiller directrs and stars in the new screen adaption of James Thurber’s classic story ‘The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty.’ Now if you judged this film by its trailer you could see that this is a film that could go either way. It could fall in a heap and be a bore just like too many of Stiller’s recent films or it could be abstract and different enough to be interesting.

Stiller stars the downtrodden, lonely loser in life Walter Mitty. A man who has no personal life but lives for his job – a job that sees him looking after photographer’s negatives at ‘Life’ magazine. He also tends to ‘zone out’ from time to time and take himself on magical journeys that only occur inside his head. However, his life is turned upside down when he soon realises that job may be taken away from him when the ambitious and plain rude Ted Hendricks (Adam Scott) arrives on the scene boasting that ‘Life’ is about to go online and heads will roll. The way he bullies Walter also shows him that his will be one of those rolling heads.

Poor Walter believes his biggest problem is finding a way to impress his work colleague and love interest Cheryl Melhoff (Kristen Wiig) but soon finds himself under even more pressure when he realises that the negative that is needed for the front page of the last edition of ‘Life’ has gone missing. This spurs Walter into action and soon he finds himself on a trip around the world trying to find the photographer, Sean O’Connell (Sean Penn).

Like ‘Reality Bites’ did early on his career ‘The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty’ reveals Stiller as a talented director. His directional style takes this film in many different directions, from heartfelt conversations through to an action sequence (thanks to one of Walter’s zone-outs). But Stiller’s directional style really comes to the fore though when he captures some of the stunning environments that Walter visits amazingly well, and the same time lifts this above its closest rival ‘Eat, Pray, Love.’

As a film ‘The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty’ really draws you in. You find yourself drawn to Walter as a character and you feel sorry for him. But as a film it goes deeper than that, the screenplay has created some interesting sub-characters including the hateable Hendricks and also eHarmony phone worker, Todd Maher (Patton Oswalt).

We all know somebody like Walter and that connection takes this film to a different level, however no matter how much human emotion is invested into the film there are times the film’s script lets it down. There are about fifteen to twenty minutes of this film that doesn’t need to be there, and it’s a shame that script editor hadn’t done a little bit of pruning.

Still that can be largely forgotten due to the fact that Stiller and his cinematographer create some amazing visuals throughout this film. They capture whatever environment they are in amazingly well, especially the barren volcanic wastelands that Stiller ends up skateboarding down. While the story does have its odd low point it clearly outguns the film most similar to it – “Eat Pray Love.”

The smooth screenplay does also allow Stiller to produce a mixture of comedy and drama and as we have learned from some of his previous roles Stiller thrives on getting to play emotionally damaged characters, and once again here he comes to the fore.

Kristen Wiig and Shirley Maclaine almost seem wasted in their roles however Patton Oswalt makes a surprising cameo that is a joy to watch but the actor who steals the show here is Adam Scott. Scott puts in one of the best performances of the year as the villainous Hendricks and while he is a source of comedic relief he also brings a sense of evil to the film.

“The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty” may dip at one point but for the most part this is a good film that once again reminds cinema lovers that Ben Stiller is more than capable when he pulls on the director’s hat. As far as feel good movies go this one is a winner.

 

 Stars(3.5)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:  The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘American Hustle′: Please check our American Hustle review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 62.

Trailer:

We're The Millers

Summary: David Burke (Jason Sudeikis) is a small-time pot dealer whose clientele includes chefs and soccer moms, but no kids – after all, he has his scruples. So what could go wrong? Plenty. Preferring to keep a low profile for obvious reasons, he learns the hard way that no good deed goes unpunished when he tries to help out some local teens and winds up getting jumped by a trio of gutter punks. Stealing his stash and his cash, they leave him in major debt to his supplier, Brad (Ed Helms). In order to wipe the slate clean – and maintain a clean bill of health – David must now become a big-time drug smuggler by bringing Brad’s latest shipment in from Mexico.

Twisting the arms of his neighbors, cynical stripper Rose (Jennifer Aniston) and wannabe customer Kenny (Will Poulter), and the tatted-and-pierced streetwise teen Casey (Emma Roberts), he devises a foolproof plan. One fake wife, two pretend kids and a huge, shiny RV later, the “Millers” are headed south of the border for a Fourth of July weekend that is sure to end with a bang.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th August, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Rawson Marshall Thurber

Screenwriter: Steve Faber, Bob Fisher, Sean Anders, John Morris

Cast: Jennifer Aniston (Rose O’Reilly), Kathryn Hahn (Edie Fitzgerald), Ed Helms (Bard Gurdlinger), Laura-Leigh (Kymberly), Thomas Lennon (Rick Nathanson), Ken Marino (Todd), Nick Offerman (Don Fitzgerald), Will Poulter (Kenny Rossmore), Molly C. Quinn (Melissa Fitzgerald), Emma Roberts (Casey Mathis), Tomer Sisley (Pablo Chacon), Jason Sudekis (David Clark), Matthew Willig (One-Eye), Mark L. Young (Scottie P.)

Runtime: 110 mins

Classification:MA15+

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘WE’RE THE MILLERS’:

David Griffiths: Stars(4)

Please check Dave’s review of ‘We’re The Millers’ that is available on The Helium Entertainment Channel

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘We’re The Millers’ that is available at www.filmreviews.net.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(3)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘We’re The Millers’ that is available on Episode #45 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Adam Ross: Stars(2)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  We're the Millers (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘We’re The Millers′: Please check Episode #45 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show for more reviews of ‘We’re The Millers’.

Trailer: