Tagged: Led Zeppelin

Founding KISS guitarist and Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame member Ace Frehley announces the release of Origins Vol. 2, his highly-anticipated second collection of eleven rock ‘n’ roll covers, due out on September 18, 2020. Today, he also releases the first single, a flawless cover of Deep Purple’s 1972 hit, “Space Truckin’” available now on all streaming platforms, and as an official music video.

Recorded at The Creation Lab in Turlock, CA, Frehley recorded guitar, bass, and vocals on “Space Truckin’” with long-time studio drummer Matt Star and keyboard player Rob Sabino (Peter Frampton,  Simon & Garfunkel).

Ace offers, ‘’Space Truckin’ was recorded years ago, and then I just re-recorded some parts and changed it a little. We never ended up putting it on a record, so it was just sitting around. It turned out very well. Rob Sabino is a very accomplished studio musician, and we actually grew up in the Bronx together, so we go way back.”

The official video for ‘Space Truckin” was directed by eOne’s Ken Gullic (VP, Sales & Acquisitions, Music) and animated by Chris Fequiere, the same team behind the “Mission to Mars” music video from Frehley’s Spaceman album in 2018.

Frehley has also re-signed with eOne for more new releases, which extends his original deal signed in 2013. During his tenure, he has released three albums worth of new material, Origins Vol. 2 is the fourth. A new studio album is planned for 2021 with two additional releases to follow.

eOne’s Scott Givens, SVP, Rock & Metal, Music says, “I am thrilled to extend our partnership with Ace Frehley.  He is a core artist for eOne and I look forward to more continued success with him.”

eOne’s Ken Gullic, VP, Sales & Acquisitions, Music, offers, “We were warned, before our first meeting with Ace in 2014, that he’d never deliver an album or get on the plane for that very meeting. He showed up with an early version of Steve Miller’s “The Joker” in hand and then cranked out eleven brand new songs at lightning speed for his first top 10 solo album ever, ‘Space Invader,’ just in time for his Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction as a KISS member in 2014. With nine albums into his vibrant solo career, one that clearly stands on its own, it’s time for Ace to be considered as a Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inducted solo performer too.”

Frehley continues his reflections on a lifetime in music with this release of Origins Vol. 2. No stranger to cover versions throughout his musical history — having recorded, rebranded and repossessed such notable nuggets as ‘New York Groove,’ ‘Do Ya’ and ‘I Wanna Go Back’ throughout his eight previous studio efforts — this new collection presents a thoughtful and exciting selection of songs that inspired and helped shape the legendary guitarist. That spirit of fun is carried through with exquisite execution, and guitar aficionados will enjoy Frehley’s fresh interpretations of these classic songs.

Origins Vol 2. features some extraordinary guests, including Robin Zander of Cheap Trick on Humble Pie’s ‘30 Days In The Hole,’ and former KISS comrade Bruce Kulick on Jimi Hendrix’s ‘Manic Depression.’ Origins Vol.1 alumnus John5 also returns, playing on Cream’s ‘Politician,’ and The Beatles’ ‘I’m Down.’ Finally, the exquisite Lita Ford returns on vocals, this time on The Rolling Stones’ 1968 hit ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash.’ Full tracklisting below.

Track List:
1. Good Times Bad Times (Led Zeppelin)
2. Never In My Life (Mountain)
3. Space Truckin’ (Deep Purple)
4. I’m Down (The Beatles)
5. Jumpin’ Jack Flash (The Rolling Stones)
6. Politician (Cream)
7. Lola (The Kinks)
8. 30 Days In The Hole (Humble Pie)
9. Manic Depression (The Jimi Hendrix Experience)
10. Kicks (Paul Revere & the Raiders)
11. We Gotta Get Out Of This Place (The Animals)
12. She (KISS) [Bonus Track]

Origins Vol. 2 will be the followup to 2016’s Origins Vol. 1, which hit #23 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, and was his second highest-charting solo album and his 4th Top 40 album.

Pre-orders are available today at www.acefrehleyorigins.com — which includes an exclusive 180g Opaque Gold Double LP variant (limited to 1000 copies + download card).

Rock Band ONE IN THE CHAMBER has released the official music video for “Blow.” “Blow” sees ONE IN THE CHAMBER return to Toronto’s Phase One Studios (RushAlice CooperThe Tragically Hip) with producer Murray Daigle and engineer Mike Smith at the helm.

“When I see a band live, I want to leave feeling like they have left their heart and soul onstage. I want energy, passion, and raw emotion to flow out of every note they play. I want to connect with this band in a way that leaves me with a high, and lingers long after they walked off stage. This is what One In The Chamber gives you every night. This is what “Blow” gives you every second.” – ONE IN THE CHAMBER

The single is the latest release from ONE IN THE CHAMBER, following their 2019 music video for “Itchin’ Back” and is their first new track since I’ve Got Something To Say…, their award winning, 2018 debut studio EP . Furthermore, the music video sees the band reunite with Director Diego del Río and Video Producer Kathleen Fobert to deliver a modern, neon haze visual that pairs perfectly with the studio recording.

Since the release of their 2018 debut studio EP, ONE IN THE CHAMBER has been compared to the likes of Guns N’ RosesLed ZeppelinVelvet RevolverSoundgardenRed Hot Chili Peppers, and Mötley Crüe. “Blow” is Toronto’s answer to the new wave of rock & roll driven by the likes of Greta Van FleetBlacktop MojoDirty HoneyThe Wild, and Them Evils. Entirely independent, dirty rock & roll straight from the heart of Toronto throw “Blow” on rotation and crank up the stereo. ONE IN THE CHAMBER is best enjoyed at 11.

Previously, One In The Chamber has released their award winning and celebrated 2018 debut studio EP, I’ve Got Something To Say….The EP has racked up over 100,000 Spotify streams along with international radio play.
Since Forming in 2015, the band has tirelessly performed throughout Toronto – including performances at The Horseshoe Tavern, Adelaide Hall, and The Opera House – and across Ontario, along with an international performance at The MGM Grand, Las Vegas and their 2019 Summer Tour culminated with their sold-out Indie Week Festival debut opening for The Wild.

One In The Chamber has shared the stage with Scott Weiland, Derek St. Holmes, and Darby Mills, while also appearing on the same festival bill as the likes of The Offspring, Live, Ill Scarlet, and Sumo Cyco. One In The Chamber was also a part of Epidemic Music Group’s Guinness World Record Breaking Concert, which ran for over 16 days.

With the release of “Blow”, One In The Chamber are back having cut their teeth on the live circuit. With a refined and gritty take on the current new wave of classic rock, One In The Chamber are set to make 2020 their biggest year yet.

 

The year was 1979 and a tiny Irish punk band were about to send out a shockwave that would not only change the genre but forever impact on the wider music scene. Surprisingly the band responsible – Belfast’s very own Stiff Little Fingers – had no idea what they about to do.

How could they? Things were not exactly going the greatest for them. The band had started out in 1977 as a rock cover band called Highway Star but then after a few line-up changes they were introduced to the sound that was punk. That lead to a brief flirtation with the name The Fast before finally settling on Stiff Little Fingers.

The uprising and violence that Ireland was experiencing at the time ended up heavy influencing the early music of Stiff Little Fingers and after recording some of their tracks in a studio normally reserved for the creation of radio jingles the band signed with Island Records, a deal which fell through.

Not to be put off the band released some cassette singles, the ‘cassette bomb’ that was ‘Suspect Device’ did cause some problems at publications it arrived at, and eventually signed with Rough Trade Records, a deal which ultimately saw part of the rise of Chrysalis Records.

That led to the release of their debut album Inflammable Material and the rest as they say is musical history. Audiences took to the album that explored deep topics such as police oppression, sectarian violence and teenage boredom and the result was the first independent album to ever chart in the UK.

“We didn’t think anything about it,” said vocalist Jake Burns who I recently had the pleasure of sitting down and talking to about the anniversary of this stunning album. “I don’t think anybody ever does, but there seemed to be a lot of time to talk about this album. People have said to me ‘did you realise that it was going to be a classic?’ or ‘did you know you know you were recording something special?’ The answer to both of those questions is no!”

“As far as we were concerned we had already been turned by literally every record label in the country. It was only through the good graces of Rough Trade saying ‘you’ve never made an album, we’ve never made an album, so let’s see what happens.’ It was a shot in the dark for them, it was a huge leap of faith for them to take us. But as far as we were concerned we had been shot down by all of these labels so this was our last shot, I think from my point of view I thought that at least if we recorded them then in forty years time when I was sitting down with my grandchildren I could be like ‘here take a listen to what I did when I was young and stupid.’ Of course flash forward forty-two years and I haven’t got any kids, let alone grandkids and I’m talking to you about it instead.”

What Inflammable Material did when it comes to musical history though is not lost on Burns. “The thing did go on to become successful on so many levels. If I knew that was going to become the case though we would have tried to bottle it, it just happened to be the right time and the right place.”

One of the ironies that followed the success of the album was that nearly all of the record labels that originally knocked back the band then came knocking. “Everyone one of them except CBS came back,” says Burns with a laugh. “We heard that CBS didn’t come back because in their words they said ‘we have enough trouble with The Clash’ which I thought was a wonderful thing for them to say about us.”

But yeah everybody else came back and it was a wonderful experience for our point of view because we were as green as grass,” he continues. “We had no experience in the music business at all. Had we been signed straight off the bat we probably would have signed the world’s worst record deal and we would have gone down that path of ‘well we did all this work and we got nothing out of it.’ I was working as an Accounts Clerk before the band took off and I could have been back doing that again, it could been like that. But the deal we did with Rough Trade, who was just as green as us, was done on a handshake that covered the costs and then we split fifty-fifty and by the end of the year the thing had sold 100,000 copies. So when these labels came back to us they were like ‘well we will give you ridiculously large advances’ but the joy of working with Rough Trade was that we didn’t have to wait for the traditional eighteen months to get paid because they were selling them themselves so we were paid straight away… so the one thing we didn’t need from the labels was money but what we did want was control over the albums so we could control what they sounded like.”

“As it turned out Chrysalis were the only label that would give us that, the others were all like ‘we’ll give you seventy five thousand pounds’ and we were like ‘we don’t want seventy five thousand pounds you’re not listening.’ But Chrysalis were like ‘okay’ and we had a really good working relationship with them. We have been pretty lucky though people have normally ‘got’ the band straightaway or have gotten on board pretty quickly so we’ve been pretty lucky.”

Despite that early success it was the deal with Chrysalis that saw Stiff Little Fingers become members of a very different league. “Rough Trade were one of the most major independent labels but all the other bands they had would make a single or do two singles and then go off it never seemed like a long term thing,” Burns explains. “No disrespect to the other bands but there were no rock ‘n’ roll legends there you weren’t going to meet The Beatles when you walked in and then over night we signed with Chrysalis and then I found myself being introduced to Rory Gallagher my hero and we were on the same level as Blondie and the same level as Jethro Tull and I was suddenly like ‘wait a second these are the guys that were in the music magazines I read when I was growing up and they are talking to me like I am there equal.’ That was when I said to myself, damn I guess this is my job now.”

They were obviously the bands that Burns himself were in awe of but over recent years bands such as Bad Religion and Rancid have mentioned that Stiff Little Fingers were a major influence on their early work and that is something you can tell that Burns is incredibly proud of. “That is very flattering,” he says with humility present in his voice. “It is always very flattering when you hear a musician say that because I know how I felt when I first met Rory Gallagher, he was just charm and friendliness personified and if I mentioned what a fan I was he would look embarrassed and say ‘oh, don’t be like that’ so we’re kind of the same. I mean I met Robert Plant from Led Zeppelin, for pete’s sake they don’t get much bigger, and we were doing a television show together… this silly little quiz thing. On the form you filled out before you went on it said ‘what was the first album you ever bought?’ and I wrote Led Zeppelin II which was true and I didn’t know then that Robert Plant was going to be on the show and then he walked into the green room and all eyes turned to him because everyone is saying ‘it’s fucking Robert Plant’ and he stood in the doorway and said ‘who is the idiot who bought my record?’ and I was like ‘me.’”

“I guess because those guys were so cool about it when it first started happening to us we were like ‘okay let’s go get a beer let’s not talk about that’, he says. “Internally though you are impressed, I mean those bands you mentioned we’ve toured with both Rancid and Bad Religion and they are both great bands, so yeah it is very flattening.”

Today Stiff Little Fingers are still together with founding members Jake Burns and Ali McMordie still at the helm. The band will be touring Australia this year and to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of Inflammable Material will be playing the album in full. Yes everybody, this is a return to the good old days of punk.

 

tracer_1

Australia has form when it comes to producing great rock music.

ACDC, Cold Chisel, The Divinyls, Rose Tattoo, Beasts of Bourbon, The Scientists, Bored, The Mark of Cain, Magic Dirt, Silverchair, Jet, Birds of Tokyo, Wolfmother and Airbourne are just a few of the bands who have led and continue to lead the way, locally and internationally today.

Adelaide bred three-piece outfit Tracer are hoping to earn their spot on that list soon.

Two EPs and years spent honing their live shows saw them picked up by the Mascot Label Group and introduced to the European rock scene.  Their 2011 debut LP, Spaces In Between gave yet more hints about the band’s potential and was quickly followed by three successful European tours and the Best New Band award at the 2012 Classic Rock Awards.

With their new album El Pistolero due to be released here on July 5th, the hard rocking outfit have well and truly started to fulfil their potential.  Produced by the legendary Kevin Shirley (Silverchair, Cold Chisel, Led Zeppelin, Iron Maiden) El Pistolero is on track to make Tracer the rock band that everyone is talking about  in 2013.

Mexico is the spiritual home of El Pistolero.  Taking inspiration from the cinematic stylings of Robert Rodriguez’s classic film Desperado, the Tex Mex vibe works well with the classic rock, stoner and grunge sounds on the album.  From atmospheric strings, heavy and sweaty rock, stomping drums and driving riffs, El Pistolero takes aim with gleeful macho abandon delivered with high calibre skill.

Great reviews and strong airplay support has further raised the band’s profile in Europe, but now the trio are looking forward to coming home.

Tracer return to celebrate the Australian release of El Pistolero and will be joining another of the great Australian rock bands The Angels, on the road for a number of shows in July and August.

TRACER TOUR DETAILS

supporting The Angels

 

Friday 12 & Saturday July 13

The Governor Hindmarsh

59 Port Rd, Hindmarsh SA

Ph: 08 8340 0744

 

Friday 19 July
Souths Juniors

558 Anzac Pde, Kingsford NSW

Ph: 02 9349 7555

 

Saturday 20 July

Wenty Leagues

50 Smith St, Wentworthville NSW

Ph: 02 8868 9200

 

Friday 26 July

Canterbury Hurlstone Park RSL

20-26 Canterbury Rd, Hurlstone Park NSW

Ph: 02 9559 0000

 

Saturday 27 July

Mounties

101 Meadows Rd, Mt Pritchard NSW

Ph: 02 9822 3555

 

Saturday 3 August

The Esplanade Hotel (Gershwin Room)

11 The Esplanade, St Kilda VIC

Ph: 03 9534 0211

 

Friday 23 August

Victoria Point Sharks Club

325 Colburn Ave, Victoria Point QLD

Ph: 07 3207 7865

 

Saturday 24 August
Racehorse Hotel

Cnr Warner St & Marine Pde, Booval QLD

Ph: 07 3282 1222