Tagged: Neil Jackson

Summary:  In the early years of the 20th century, the Kingsman agency is formed to stand against a cabal plotting a war to wipe out millions.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  6th January 2022 (Australia), 31st December 2021 (Thailand), 26th December 2021 (UK), 22nd December 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: Germany, UK, ,USA, France, Italy

Director: Matthew Vaughn

Screenwriter: Matthew Vaughn, Karl Gajdusek

Cast: Ross Anderson (Corporal Johnstone), Robert Aramayo (Sergeant Major Atkins), Gemma Arterton (Polly), Lucia Jade Barker (Grand Duchess Olga), Joel Basman (Gavrilo Princip), Todd Boyce (Dupont), Daniel Bruhl (Erik Jan Hanussen), Callum Chiplin (Declan Nell), Ron Cook (Archduke Franz Ferdinand Of Austria), Max Count (Young King George), Charles Dance (Kitchener), Dora Davis (Grand Duchess Maria), Harris Dickinson (Conrad Oxford), August Diehl (Vladimir Lenin), Barbara Drennan (Sophie, Duchess Of Hohenberg), Ralph Fiennes (Orlando Oxford), Rosie Goddard (Grand Duchess Anastasia), Matthew Goode (Morton), George Gooderham (Young Tsar Nicholas), Tom Hollander (King George/Kaiser Wilhelm/Tsar Nicholas), Djimon Hounsou (Shola), Rhys Ifans (Grigori Rasputin), Neil Jackson (Captain Forrest), Branka Katic (Tsarina Alix), Ian Kelly (President Woodrow Wilson), Alexandra Maria Lara (Emily Oxford), Nigel Lister (Arthur Zimmerman), Molly McGeachin (Grand Duchess Tatiana), Kristian Wanzl Nekrasov (General Ludendorff), Emil Oksanen (Young Kaiser Wilhelm), Valerie Pachner (Mata Hari), Alexa Povah (Queen Victoria), Alexander Shaw (Young Conrad), Alexander Shefler (Tsareich Alexei), Alison Steadman (Rita), Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Archie Reid), Aaron Vodovoz (Felix Yusupov), Toby Woolf (Young Conrad)

Running Time: 130 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 18 (Thailand), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR THE KING’S MAN REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The King’s Man Review:

One of the best franchises to have surfaced over the past decade has been the very British King’s Man franchise. A kind of mix between James Bond and a Quentin Tarantino film the original film not only made Taron Egerton a household name but also introduced the world of a cinema to a secret organisation that could even see Colin Firth lay waste to a room full of villains.

A second film soon followed and of course fans of the franchise soon started to ask more and more questions about this society and how it began. Well now those questions are answered as writer/director Matthew Vaughn (Kick-Ass) returns to the universe with a prequel aptly titled The King’s Man.

The film chronicles the early days of The King’s Man organisation as widely respected pacifist Orlando Oxford(Ralph Fiennes – Schindler’s List) works with his hired help, Polly (Gemma Arterton – Clash Of The Titans) and Shola (Djimon Hounsou – Guardians of The Galaxy), to investigate a cabal that he believes he is working to keep World War I continuing as long as they can.

While the cabal, which is headed by Morton (Matthew Goode – Stoker) and aided by the likes of Rasputin (Rhys Ifans – The Amazing Spider-Man), are playing out their cunning plan Orlando finds himself wanting to try and end the war anyway he can after his only son, Conrad (Harris Dickinson – Beach Rats), expresses an interest in enlisting.

The term prequel when it comes to an established franchise is often a scary notion but Vaughn has delivered an absolute classic with this film – it is easily better than the second film and gives the audience a great insight into the organisation and the characters that started it.

The power of this film though is that Vaughn is more than willing to try various things throughout the film. Yes, the traditional action sequences that made the first film so special are back, but added to that is the fact that Vaughn has a real handle on characterisation this time. Then there is also the brilliant screenplay, which is co-written by Karl Gajdusek (Oblivion), which goes from tear-jerking moments to laughs with ease and is never afraid to mix genres as well. The scene in which a trio of king’s men take on Raputin has just the right mix of comedy and action and is one of the best cinematic moments of the year, as is one of the film’s biggest twists that we unfortunately can’t talk about here as it would be a spoiler for a major plot point.

The strongest point of this script though is the relationship that Vaughn stets up between Orlando and Conrad. The dynamics between the two shift from a relationship made up care and respect through to a combative nature that makes both explore their views on the Great War. Even better is the fact that Vaughn moves away from Hollywood tropes to bring a close to the storyline that is a sheer stroke of screenwriting genius.

To the credit of the screenwriting team there are no wasted characters in this film either. While a lot of focus is placed on Orlando and Conrad that doesn’t mean that that characters of Polly and Shola are left lacking. Both have enough characterisation to make them interesting enough characters and most audience members will find that the hint that there may be a follow-up film to this one very welcoming.

The brilliant acting performances here though belong to Ralph Fiennes and Rhys Ifans. Fiennes is an acting force in this film – delivering both action and dramatic scenes amazingly well and he is well matched alongside a nearly unrecognisable Ifans playing the notorious Rasputin. The fact that Ifans is able to make the character comical while remaining a fearful villain is credit to both actor and screenplay.

The King’s Man will be loved by fans of the franchise and newcomers alike. The right mix of action and characterisation make this a memorable film while the amazing screenplay and characterisation make this a worthy entry into this already brilliant franchise.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture The King’s Man Reviews:

You can read our review of The King’s Man from The Phuket News here – https://www.thephuketnews.com/the-king-man-excels-82570.php

Trailer:

You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger

Summary: Director Woody Allen once again assembles an all-star cast including Anthony Hopkins, Naomi Watts and Josh Brolin for his comedy of two couples who find their lives turned upside down by unfulfilled longings. Alfie (Hopkins) is the husband of Helena (Gemma Jones) and the father of Sally (Watts). Sally’s marriage to Roy (Josh Brolin) is in jeopardy after she falls for Greg (Antonio Banderas). Both father and daughter find themselves running away from their romantic problems.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 17th January, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, Spain

Director: Woody Allen

Screenwriter: Woody Allen

Cast: Roger Ashton-Griffiths (Jonathan), Antonio Banderas (Greg), Ewan Bremner (Henry Strangler), Josh Brolin (Roy), Pauline Collins (Cristal), Anna Friel (Iris), Anthony Hopkins (Alfie), Celia Imrie (End Wicklow), Neil Jackson (Alan), Theo James (Ray), Gemma Jones (Helena), Alex Macqueen (Malcolm Dodds), Zack Orth (Narrator), Jim Piddock (Peter Wicklow), Freida Pinto (Dia), Lucy Punch (Charmaine), Naomi Watts (Sally), Fenella Woolgar (Jane)

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stanger’ Review: 

Poor old Woody Allen (To Rome With Love, Midnight In Paris) while directing the brilliant ‘Midnight In Paris’ resurrected his career and once again reminded the world of the fact that he is a filmmaking genius but it has also cast a shadow of everything he has released ever since. See you make a masterpiece and nothing else quite equals it.

‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger’ was actually made before ‘Midnight In Paris’ but is only just surfacing in Australia now, and to be honest it is a pretty good romantic drama but it is nowhere near as good as ‘Midnight In Paris’.

The film’s plot follows two couples. Firstly there is Helena (Gemma Jones – The Lady Vanishes, TV’S Death In Paradise) and Alfie (Anthony Hopkins – 360, Thor) who have just become divorced after Alfie went through an old-age crisis and decided he was too young for Helena… when actually he is just refusing to admit that he is growing old.

Now Helena is trying to get her life back on track after a failed suicide attempt by listening to everything that so-called medium, Cristal (Pauline Collins – Quartet, Albert Nobbs) is telling her. Meanwhile Alfie is leaking money like there is no tomorrow in a bid to impress his younger bride, escort and sometimes actress Charmaine (Lucy Punch – Stand Up Guys, Yellow).

Then there is Helena and Alfie’s daughter Sally (Naomi Watts – Two Mothers, Movie 43) who is married to frustrated writer Roy (Josh Brolin – Gangster Squad, Men In Black 3). While neither would admit the love went out of their marriage a long time ago and now Roy is stimulated by next door neighbor Dia (Freida Pinto – Immortals, Black Gold) while Sally is developing feelings for her boss Greg (Antonio Banderas – Ruby Sparks, Haywire).

If you think you’ll settle into watching ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger’ and laugh away at Woody Allen’s usual witty comedy think again! Here Allen takes a trip down the romantic drama path and it has to be said that it works quite well. The fact that Allen has brought his usual style of characterisation to the film is what makes it work so well. Each character is unique and you are quickly drawn to them.

As a film ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stanger’ does twist and wind its way through the characters’ lives but it is not an aimless journey instead it seems as though Allen is using the film to take a fair swipe at love, suggesting that the illusion of love is better than love itself. It may be a little cynical but Allen’s good script really allows him to make a powerful statement.

As usual Allen has put together a stellar cast and once again they deliver for him. Naomi Watts as usual does a great job while it’s good to see Josh Brolin shrug off some of the cornier roles that he has done recently. It is also good to see Anthony Hopkins also take on a role where he can once again show that he can be a dramatic actor without having to go down the ‘evil’ path.

Yes ‘You Will Meet A Talk Dark Stranger’ is nowhere near as good as ‘Midnight In Paris’ but it is still a worthy romantic drama to check out.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger′: Check Episode #16 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger’. Dave’s other review of ‘You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Rating: 3.5/5

IMDB Rating: You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger (2010) on IMDb