Tagged: Nelson Ascencio

The Hunger games Catching Fire Poster

Summary: Katniss and Peeta are dethroned from their respective victory riches and are put back into the arena for the most climatic and menacing of the Hunger Games, known as the Quarter Quell.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st November, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Francis Lawrence

Screenwriter: Simon Beaufoy, Michael Arndt, Suzanne Colllins (novel)

Cast: Nelson Ascencio (Flavius), Elizabeth Banks (Effie Trinket), Bruce Bundy (Octavia), John Casino (Woof), Sam Clafin (Finnick Odair), Lynn Cohen (Mags), Rita Conte (Hob), Stef Dawson (Annie Cresta), Rode Ferland (Marcus), Wilbur Fitzgerald (Cray), Meta Golding (Enobaria), Bruno Gunn (Brutus), Woody Harrelson (Haymitch Abernathy), Megan Hayes (Female Morphling),, Liam Hemsworth (Gale Hawthorne), Philip Seymour Hoffman (Plutarch Heavensbee), Maria Howell (Seeder), Josh Hutcherson (Peeta Mellark), Toby Jones (Claudius Templesmith), Bobby Jordan (Blight), Lenny Kravitz (Cinna), Sandra Ellis Lafferty (Greasy Sae), Jennifer Lawrence (Katniss Everdeen), Jena Malone (Johanna Mason), E. Roger Mitchell (Chaff), Amanda Plummer (Wiress), Jack Quaid (Marvel), Alan Ritchson (Gloss), Elena Sanchez (Cecelia), Stephanie Leigh Schlund (Cashmere), Willow Shields (Primrose Everdeen), Taylor St. Clair (Ripper), Patrick St. Esprit (Commander Thread), Donald Sutherland (President Snow), Stanley Tucci (Caesar Flickerman), Jeffrey Wright (Beetee)

Runtime: 146 mins

Classification:M

OUR THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Adam Ross: You can read Adam’s full The Hunger Games: Catching Fire review on The Crat.

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Nick Gardener: You can read Nick’s full The Hunger Games: Catching Fire review on Southern FM

Stars(4)

 

David Griffiths:

The original “The Hunger Games” film left audiences in the middle. On one hand it was a better teenage genre flick than the later “Twilight Saga” films, but on the other hand the fact it was aimed at a younger audience meant that director Gary Ross held back on some of the darker elements that were portrayed in the novel.

Now comes “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” the difficult second film in the trilogy. Some three-part franchises choke when it comes to the second film, the film does nothing to bridge the first to the third film and becomes a dull affair for the audience. That certainly can’t be said for “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” that equals the original film and overcomes a couple of flaws by director Francis Lawrence’s (“Water For Elephants,” “I Am Legend”) decision to allow the film to find its dark side.

Following the series of novels by Suzanne Collins “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” is set twelve months after the original film. The young hero Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence – “The Devil You Know,” “Silver Linings Playbook”) is back living in District 12, although this time she is the nicer diggings of the Victor’s Village. Life is far from easy for her though as Katniss is forced to live a double life. Behind closed doors she is sorting out her feelings for good friend Gale Hawthorne (Liam Hemsworth – “Paranoia,” “Empire State”) while in public her fake relationship with fellow Hunger Games winner Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson – “Epic,” “Red Dawn”) must continue.

On the eve of joining the promotional train for the 75th Annual Hunger Games Katniss’ life is further turned upside down when she learns that her’s and Peter’s actions have seen them become the face of a threatened revolution. After a threat from President Snow (Donald Sutherland – “Jappeloup,” “The Best Offer”) Katniss realises that she must ‘tow the line’ but with that not working she soon finds her and Peter having to team up with Haymitch Abernathy (Woody Harrelson – “Out Of The Furnace,” “Free Birds”) to survive a new game thought up by Snow and his new right-hand man Plutarch Heavensbee (Philip Seymour Hoffman – “A Late Quartet,” “The Master”).

Francis Lawrence does push the boundaries of this franchise a little more. He makes it a bit bloodier and even enhances the metaphor of Snow’s regime being similar to Nazi Germany but sadly Lawrence and his cinematographer Jo Willems (“Gotham,” “Limitless”) leave the audience a little underwhelmed with the film awash with a bland look.

Still that doesn’t put too much of a dampener on the film because the story really does come to the forefront. This film raising the stakes for most of the main characters certainly brings more suspense to the screen and despite some badly signposted areas of the film there are enough unexpected twists and turns to warrant the audience paying full attention. Unlike most teenage franchises you also get the feeling that this is one series that isn’t too afraid to kill off main characters if the story calls for that, at the end of the day that just enhances the suspense even more.

One disappointing thing about “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” is that Josh Hutcherson and Jennifer Lawrence just seem to breeze through their performances. Lawrence has shown in films like “Winter’s Bone” and “Silver Linings Playbook” that she is one of the finest young actresses going around but she never really gets to show those skills this time around. A real waste of an Oscar winner if I’ve ever seen one.

Liam Hemsworth also doesn’t get any decent screen time but Donald Sutherland is rewarded for his patience with the first film with the chance to really sink his teeth into a really menacing role… something that he seems to grasp with two hands. But stealing the show are Woody Harrelson and Stanley Tucci (“The Fifth Estate,” “Percy Jackson: Sea Of Monsters”). Harrelson continues to remind audiences what a fine actor he is with his great portrayal of the alcoholic Haymitch while Tucci shows his versatility by showboating as the energetic master-of-ceremonies Caesar.

There is no doubt that Francis Lawrence certainly lifts this franchise to a different level with his darker approach to “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.” Sure there will be some out there that simply want to put the film down because it is part of a popular franchise but truthfully this is fairly decent film that certainly isn’t a waste of time to take a look at.

 Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Hunger Games: Catching Fire′: You can also read Dave’s The Hunger Games: Catching Fire review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Paul

Summary: Nick Frost and Simon Pegg star as two science-fiction freaks who, while on a quest to discover what lies at the heart of Nevada’s infamous Area 51, cross paths with an alien (voice of Seth Rogen) on the run from earthly authorities.

Year: 2011

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th April, 2011

Australian DVD Release Date: 17th August, 2011

Country: USA/UK

Director: Greg Mottola

Screenwriter: Nick Frost, Simon Pegg

Cast: Nelson Ascencio (Jorge), Jason Bateman (Agent Zoil), Blythe Danner (Tara Walton), Nick Frost (Clive Gollings), Bill Hader (Haggard), Brett Michael Jones (Keith Nash), David Koecher (Gus), Paula LaBaredas (Princess Leia), Jane Lynch (Pat Stevens), John Carroll Lynch (Moses Buggs), Simon Pegg (Graeme Willy), Jesse Plemons (Jake), Phoebe Price (Princess Lea), Seth Rogen (Paul (voice)), Steven Spielberg (himself (voice)), Mia Stalland (Young Tara), Jeffrey Tambor (Adam Shadowchild), Joe Lo Truglio (O’Reilly), Sigourney Weaver (The Big Guy), Kristen Wiig (Ruth Buggs)

Runtime: 104 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘PAUL’:

David Griffiths:Stars(3)

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Paul’ Review: Move over Ricky Gervais, the true Kings of Comedy want their throne back. While Paul isn’t as good as Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz, it once again shows that when it comes to comedy nobody really knows the game like Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. While it isn’t as good as their previous efforts, it is still a million times better than a lot of the films served up in cinemas these days.

Paul tells the story of English comic book nerds Graeme Willy (Simon Pegg) and Clive Gollings (Nick Frost) as they arrive in the U.S. to attend Comic Con and to also take a journey through the Extraterrestrial Heartland of America. However, their journey doesn’t go as planned when they run into Paul (voiced by Seth Rogen), an alien who is desperately trying to get back to his home planet. Just to add to their concerns, they soon find themselves being chased by the authorities, led on the ground by Agent Zoil (Jason Bateman) and then running into religious nut, Ruth Buggs (Kristen Wiig).

Greg Mottola really does earn his keep as director of Paul. While many may say that the director, who has brought movies such as Superbad and Adventureland to the world, is in his element directing a comedy, you really do need to sit back and take a look at what Nick Frost and Simon Pegg’s script called for him to do.

It called him to direct a comedy with some science fiction and action sequences thrown in for good measure that also has a dramatic storyline at the centre. That and he has to direct Paul, a CGI character that for obvious reasons was never on set to take his place in scenes. Luckily Mottola was up to the task, and what you are left with is a film that seamlessly welds nearly all of the film genres together. Frost and Pegg also need to be congratulated for the fact that they remembered that even though they were writing a comedy, the audience does in fact enjoy having some character development.

Aside from their script, Frost and Pegg also put in relatively good performances in the lead roles. As usual they are certainly on top of the comedic scenes, and to their credit, they also pull off the dramatic scenes surprisingly well. Gone are the days when a comedy actor can just rely on being funny to be great in a role.

Honorable mention must also be made of Kristen Wiig who steals many a scene with an amazingly hilarious portrayal of Ruth, while Jason Bateman also does a fine effort playing Agent Zoil. It really is a pity we don’t get to see him in more films.

If you loved Fanboys, you’ll love Paul. It is a terrific comedy that is a must see for all of the fanboys out there!

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating: Paul (2011) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Paul′: This review was first published in Buzz Magazine.

Sometimes when you are successful you unintentionally set yourself up for a fall. That is certainly the case for Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, when you are the creative minds behind brilliant films like Shaun Of The Dead and Hot Fuzz people expect something amazing every time you put pen to paper. Paul is nowhere near as good as the previously mentioned films, but having said that it is still ten times better than most of the films around today.

Paul tells the story of English comic book nerds, Graeme Willy (Simon Pegg – The Chronicle Of Narnia – The Voyage Of The Dawn Treader, Burke And Hare) and Clive Gollings (Nick Frost – TV’S Money, The Boat That Rocked) as they arrive in the U.S. to attend Comic Con and to also take a journey through the ‘Extraterrestrial Heartland Of America’. However their journey doesn’t go as planned when they run into Paul (voiced by Seth Rogen – Fight For Your Right Revisited, The Green Hornet), an alien who is desperately trying to get back to his home planet. Just to add to their concerns they soon find themselves being chased by the authorities, led on the ground by Agent Zoil (Jason Bateman – The Switch, TV’S Sit Down Shut Up) and then running into religious nut, Ruth Buggs (Kristen Wiig – TV’S Saturday Night Live, Funny Or Die Presents…).

Greg Mottola (Adventureland, Superbad) was the right choose as a director for Paul. Using Frost and Pegg’s script as a guidance he does a wonderful job mixing outrageous comedy while not forgetting that there is also a dramatic storyline also going on. Poor Mottola certainly gets his directional skills tested as he practically has to weld all genres together (apart from drama and comedy there is also sci-fi and action to throw into the mix) seamlessly, as well as direct, Paul… a character that is never present on the set. Luckily, he is up to the task and what you are left with is a film that a pure joy to watch.

Once again Nick Frost and Simon Pegg show why they are the two best comedic actors going around at the moment. Their comedy scenes are impeccable while much to their credit they can also pull-off dramatic scenes with ease. Credit must also be paid to Jason Bateman who is excellent as the deliberately rubbery Agent Zoil and Kristen Wiig who steals the show on a number of occasions with her over-the-top portrayal of Ruth.

Paul is a terrific comedy that is a must see for comic book fans out there. It is the best fanboy comedy since… well Fanboys.

Trailer: