Tagged: Peter Krausz

Summary:  A dystopian world where there are no women and all living creatures can hear each other’s thoughts in a stream of images, words, and sounds called Noise.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 4th March 2021 (Australia), 11th March 2021 (Thailand), 5th March 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 2nd April 2021 (UK)

Country: USA, Canada, Hong Kong

Director: Doug Liman

Screenwriter: Christopher Ford, Patrick Ness

Cast: Olunike Adeliyi (Piper), Tyrone Benskin (Hammer), Claudia Besso (Gwen), Demian Bichir (Ben), Tomar Boyd (Farbranch), Bryce Buckbauer (Young Davy), Blane Crockarell (Young Todd), Mylene Dinh-Robic (Julie), Jazzy Ellis (Lilly), Cynthia Erivo (Hildy), Frank Fontaine (Mr Phelps), Patrick Garrow (Ivan), Francois Gauthier (Charlie), Isabelle Giroux (Jenny Hewitt), Bobby Hernandez (Captain Alvarez), Tom Holland (Todd), Oscar Jaenada (Wilf), Nick Jonas (Davy Prentiss Jnr.), Don Jordan (Tam), Vincent Leclerc (Daws), Bethany Anne Lind (Karyssa Hewitt), Ray McKinnon (Matthew), Mads Mikkelsen (Mayor Prentiss), Tara Nicodemo (Tara), Yadi Nieves (Jackie), David Oyelowo (Aaron), Petra Post (Sweet Julie), Julian Richings (Gault), Daisy Ridley (Viola), Peter Seaborn (Caleb), Kurt Sutter (Cillian)

Running Time: 109 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (Thailand), 12-A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR CHAOS WALKING REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Chaos Walking Review:

Tom Holland and Daisy Ridley! When it comes to pop culture film stars you couldn’t get two bigger. She is the face and main star of the latest batch of Star Wars adventures and he… well he is Spider-Man. The fact that the pair of them have joined forced in a film that very few people know about despite the fact it is in cinemas now is deeply astounding.

With America’s cinemas still out of commission it feels like some films are being released into cinemas without much fanfare and sadly Chaos Walking is one of those. Not just sadly because it means pop culture fans are likely to miss out on two of their favourite stars on the big screen but also sadly because this is one teenage post-apocalyptic movie that is going to appeal to people of all ages.

Set on a planet called New World Chaos Walking finds Todd (Tom Holland Spider-Man: Far From Home) living in a woman-less society. Raised by Ben (Demian Bichir – The Hateful Eight) and Cillian (Kurt Sutter – Sons Of Anarchy) Todd has been raised to believe that all woman on the planet were killed by an invading army of aliens. Now he spends the days working on the farm, trying to control his Noise (thoughts that can be heard by others) and trying to avoid a mad priest (David Oyelowo – Selma).

Todd’s fathers become worried though when he starts to find favour with the town’s fearless Mayor (Mads Mikkelsen – Another Round) but even that relationship is put to the test when Todd is the person that finds the crashed space-craft of a young woman named Viola (Daisy Ridley – Star Wars: The Force Awakens).

Directed by Doug Liman, the amazing filmmaker who has brought us films like The Bourne Identity and Edge Of Tomorrow, Chaos Walking goes far beyond your average teenage dystopian film and places itself in that elite side of the category that includes films like The Maze Runner and Divergent. Despite knowing the audience that this film is based at there is something edgy about the film. Todd doesn’t mind dropping the odd profanity and when the heroes do find themselves under the threat you know there is a good chance they may not get out of it alive.

The alternative nature of the film also seems to be embraced by the actors. Mads Mikkelsen brings his A-Game as he portrays a menacing Mayor with a world of secrets while the film also exposes a side of the acting of Ridley and Holland that few would have seen before. Many people have wondered whether or not Ridley has what it takes to make a career for herself outside of Star Wars and this is the film that suggests she certainly can.

The same can also be said for Holland. Unlike Ridley though Tom Holland had runs on the board before the franchise that made him a household name. Anyone who watched The Impossible, a film about the tragic Boxing Day tsunami, knew that Holland was going to become a star. Here in Chaos Walking he does what he did last year with The Current War and shows that he is going to be one of Hollywood’s best actors with or without the label of a superhero behind him.

Much of what there is to like about Chaos Walking also comes to the brilliant work of Doug Liman. Just like he did with The Bourne Identity Liman has audiences on the edge of their seat for a majority of the film and this is a film that he had to work hard to make. There were frequent re-writes and re-shoots throughout the film which of course caused major concerns with the busy schedules of the film’s stars so it really is a miracle that this film has ever made it cinemas. Those that love quality films though will be very thankful that it did.

Chaos Walking is one of the surprise hits of 2021. A step above most teenage sci-fi films this is the kind of film that will be embraced by people of all ages and once you have seen it you will be eagerly waiting to see if they decide to make more films in the franchise.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Alex First, Greg King and Peter Krausz’s Chaos Walking Review

Greg’s Rating Out Of 5:

Peter’s Rating Out Of 5:

Alex’s Rating Out Of 5:

Lee Griffiths’ Chaos Walking Review:

Lee’s Score Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Chaos Walking (2021) on IMDb

Other Subculture Chaos Walking Reviews:

You can also check out our review that ran in The Phuket News right here – https://www.thephuketnews.com/tom-holland-daisy-ridley-find-themselves-chaos-walking-79318.php

Trailer:

Summary: Six years after his daughter disappears a man is hired to kill the author of a fantasy novel in order to have his daughter returned.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 12th February 2021 (Australia), 12th March 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: China

Director: Yang Lu

Screenwriter: Shu Chen, Yang Lu, Haiyan Qin

Cast: Lei Jiayin (Guan Ning), Guo Jingfei (Black Armour), Yang Mi (Tu Ling), Dong Zijan (Kongwen Lu)

Running Time: 130 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia)

OUR A WRITER’S ODYSSEY REVIEWS

Alex First, David Griffiths and Peter Krausz’s A Writer’s Odyssey Review:

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Peter’s Score Out Of 5:

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A Writer's Odyssey (2021) on IMDb

Other Subculture A Writer’s Odyssey Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Summary: A young warrior sets off to find the last remaining dragon after her world faces annihilation at the hands of some dark monsters.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 4th March 2021 (Australia), 4th March 2021 (Thailand), 5th March 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 5th March 2021 (UK), 5th March 2021 (USA)

Country: USA

Director: Don Hall, Carlos Lopez Estrada

Screenwriter: Adele Lim, Qui Nugyen

Cast: Awkwafina (Sisu (voice)), Gemma Chan (Namarri (voice)), Francois Chau (Wahn), Sung Kang (Dang Hai (voice)), Daniel Dae Kim (Benja (voice)), Dichen Lachman (General Atitaya, Spine Warror (voice)), Sandra Oh (Virana (voice)), Jon Park (Chai (voice)), Lucielle Soong (Dang Hu (voice)), Kelly Marie Tran (Raya (voice)), Thalia Tran (Little Noi (voice)), Alan Tudyk (Tuk Tuk (voice)), Izaac Wang (Boun (voice)), Benedict Wong (Tong (voice)), Jona Xiao (Young Namaari (voice))

Running Time: 114 mins

Classification: PG (Australia), G (Thailand), PG (USA)

BLACKBIRD REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Raya And The Last Dragon Review:

It is hard to believe that it has been twelve months since Disney released a brand new film straight to cinemas… yes even the House Of Mouse was not immune from the great Covid cinema lockdown worldwide. The great news is that Disney returns to cinemas this week with a film that is arguably one of their greatest pieces of animated brilliance – Raya And The Last Dragon.

It is rare these days to find an animation that has adults staring wide-eyed and excited at the screen the way that so many of the Disney classics did when we were kids but such is the stunning artwork and captivating storyline of Raya that it certainly wakes up your inner child.

Inspired by South East Asian culture the film follows the adventures of Raya (voiced by Kelly Marie Tran – Star Wars: The Last Jedi) a young warrior who is trained by her father Benja (Daniel Dae Kim – Hellboy) to guard the last remaining piece of dragon power contained in a magical gem stone.

They live in a world divided, a place where every tribe has fended for itself since a great war that saw the destruction of the dragon race at the hands of evil creatures known as Druuns. Since then the land of Kumandra has become separated and the various tribes do whatever they can to survive while people such as Benja do whatever they can to try and reunite everybody once again.

However, when Raya is tricked by Namaari (Gemma Chan – Crazy Rich Asians), a young warrior from another tribe, the gem breaks and each tribe takes a piece for itself at the same time the spell is broken and the Druuns once again return and begin to destroy what is left on Earth. With the world then slowly disappearing and mankind being wiped out Raya begins a journey to try and find the last remaining dragon – Sisu (Awkwafina – Ocean’s Eight).

Excuse the pun but the magic of Raya And The Last Dragon is out of this world. The storyline here is involving and creative and this time Disney have realised that they don’t need a song every five minutes to move things along a little bit. In fact this time around the screenwriters and the literal team of directors that worked on the film get everything right.

The story itself draws you in the same way as other modern day fantasy tales, such as A Writer’s Odyssey, do while the film doesn’t exactly cater for extremely young children as it mixes fight sequences with chase sequences and even finds a way to throw in some humour without it ever seeming out of place. The world created here is as imaginative as the worlds film lovers a generation ago found themselves escaping to with films like The Neverending Story and The Dark Crystal and while the story is in depth it never loses its audience and instead keeps them on the edge of their seats.

What makes Raya And The Last Dragon come together so well though is the amazing artwork with the animation. There are times with this film where you find yourself watching the screen and believing you are watching actual actors and actresses as the artwork is so realistic – the same can be said for the scenery which was inspired by the filmmakers trips to Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. Part of what makes the animation of this film work so well is also because the art team decided to make the characters look like the actors and actresses playing them. As soon as Benja walks onto screen the likeness he has in appearance to Daniel Dae Kim is astounding – and yes the filmmakers even find a way to make Sisu look like Awkwafina.

Raya And The Last Dragon is one of the cinematic highlights of 2021. Disney manage to bring everything together in such a way that the capture that old school Disney magic that has been missing from the company for quite awhile. This is truly a film for people of all ages as even adults are going to be captured by the magic and imagination of Raya.

David Griffiths and Lee G’s Raya And The Last Dragon Review:

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Lee’s Rating Out Of 5:

Alex First and Peter Krausz’s Raya And The Last Dragon Review:

Alex’s Score Out Of 5:

Peter’s Score Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Raya and the Last Dragon (2021) on IMDb

Other Subculture Raya And The Last Dragon Reviews:

You can also check out our review for Raya And The Last Dragon in The Phuket News https://www.thephuketnews.com/disney-is-back-raya-and-the-last-dragon-reigns-supreme-79250.php

Trailer:

Summary: A terminally ill mother arranges for her family to get together one more time before she dies.

Year: 2019

Cinema Release Dates: 25th February 2021 (Australia)

VOD Release Dates: 21st September 2020 (UK)

Country: USA/UK

Director: Roger Michell

Screenwriter: Christian Torpe

Cast: Anson Boon (Jonathan), Lindsay Duncan (Liz), Sam Neil (Paul), Susan Sarandon (Lily), Bex Taylor-Klaus (Chris), Mia Wasikowska (Anna), Rainn Wilson (Michael), Kate Winslet (Jennifer)

Running Time: 97 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

BLACKBIRD REVIEWS

David Griffiths and Lee G’s Blackbird Review:

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Lee’s Rating Out Of 5:

Alex First, Greg King and Peter Krauszs Blackbird Review:

Alex’s Score Out Of 5:

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Blackbird (2019) on IMDb

Other Subculture Blackbird Reviews:

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PETER KRAUSZ

Peter is a former Chair of the AFCA, FIPRESCI juror: Munich Film Festival and Adelaide Film Festival, Broadcaster and film reviewer for Movie Metropolis on WYN FM 88.9 (Saturdays 8PM-10PM), Sole film reviewer for the monthly publication The Melbourne Catholic, advisor to the Tasmanian Film Festival (BOFA), Indonesian Film Festival, Polish Film Festival, and other festival and film events. He also serves on jury panels and hosts Q&As for film screenings. 

Currently Peter Krausz has 5 reviews on Subculture Entertainment

Summary: A group of middle-aged school teachers take part in a medical experiment that involves constant drinking in a bid to turn around their mundane lives

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 11th February 2021 (Australia), 18th December 2020 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: Denmark, Sweden, Netherlands

Director: Thomas Vinterberg

Screenwriter: Thomas Vinterberg, Tobias Lindholm

Cast: Maria Bonnevie (Anika), Cassius Aasav Browning (Sander), Aya Grann (Josephine), Martin Greis-Rosenthal (Overtjener), Waldemar Beer Hansen (Hjalte), Max Kaysen Hoyrup (Brille), Gustav Sigurth Jeppeson (Rasmus), Thomas Bo Larsen (Tommy), Freja Bella Lindahl (Caro), Albert Rudbeck Lindhart (Sebastian), Lucas Helt Mortensen (Fjonk), Mads Mikkelsen (Martin), Magnus Millang (Nikolaj), Maria Ovi (Sigrid), Clara Phillipson (Nicola), Helene Reingaard Neumann (Amalie), Lars Ranthe (Peter), Frederik Winther Rasmussen (Malthe), Mercedes Claro Schelin (Laura), Magnus Sjorup (Jonas), Silas Cornelius Van (Kasper), Aksel Vedseggard (Jason), Susse Wold (Rektor)

Running Time: 117 mins

Classification: M (Australia), TV-MA (USA)

ANOTHER ROUND REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Another Round Review:

After the disaster that was Buddy Games you could probably understand why I was a little nervous about sitting down and watching another film about middle aged men getting up to drunken hi-jinks with Another Round. Of course I didn’t factor something major into the equation though – Buddy Games of course came from that merry old country of the USA while Another Round hails from Scandinavia… a region of the world known for its brilliant cinematic pieces.

It is partially true that Another Round is about drunken hi-jinks, because realistically the film goes a lot deeper than that. The film centres around a depressed high school history teacher named Martin (Mads Mikkelsen – Doctor Strange) who is made aware of how far he has sunk into depression when his senior history class raises concerns that they are being so badly taught that they are likely to fail their graduation exams.

That makes Martin realise that his depression is also affecting his marriage and he needs to do something about it. That something is soon discovered when Martin and his school teacher buddies find out about a study, conducted by psychiatrist Finn Skarderud, that has revealed that humans may function better if they are slightly intoxicated. Soon Martin, Tommy (Thomas Bo Larsen – The Hunt), Nikolaj (Magnus Millang – Heavy Load) and Peter (Lars Ranthe – Adam’s Apples) are conducting their own ‘research’ into the experiment with mixed results.

What director/screenwriter Thomas Vinterberg (The Hunt) has created here is one of the most important films of 2021. Often as a man you find yourself going through a range of emotions and never really knowing how to deal with them. Unlike Hollywood would have you think we don’t sit around talking to each other about marriage problems and if we are feeling a bit ‘down’ that week. Instead men hold onto it and let it fester – and sometimes it takes a movie like this one to really make us guys think ‘hey maybe I should do something about that.’

Another Round is not a film that glorifies a drinking culture, to the contrary without spoiling any major plot points I can say that the experiment at hand in the film causes some serious problems for some of the characters at hand. Likewise this isn’t a film that goes for the ‘childish’ style of excessive drinking that films like Buddy Games do, instead this is a film that has some powerful things to say and gets that across beautifully well. The heart and emotion that surrounds this film is understood even more when you realise that the director’s daughter died only days before the film begun shooting… something that touched the entire cast and crew as she was also to have a role in the film.

The powerful screenplay behind Another Round also has a massive affect on the acting performances in the film. Mads Mikkelsen is amazing here to the point where you find yourself asking – could there be an Oscar nomination in the wind? His portrayal of Martin has to be seen to be believed and he is so convincing in the role it really does feel like the audience is being taken on a character journey throughout the film.

I strongly get the feeling that when I put together my Best Of list at the end of this year that Another Round is going to be pretty high on it. This film not only deserves its Golden Globe nominations but is one of the films of the year.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Alex First’s Another Round Review:

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Greg King’s Another Round Review:

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Peter Krausz’s Another Round Review:

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Another Round (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture Another Round Reviews:

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Sci Fi Film Festival Logo

With entries about to close for the 2014 SciFi Film Festival the judges of the 2014 Festival have been announced. They are:

  • Lorraine Bayly was born in Narrandera, a small town in Central New South Wales. Her first performance was at age 3, playing tambourine with the Salvation Army. Ages 5-9, she wrote, directed and starred in plays in the local jail; her father being a policeman, amateur magician and ventriloquist. Age 9-10, she had a ventriloquist act which 35 years later she performed part of on The Parkinson Show in 1984, using Michael as her dummy. Age 11-12, Lorraine played classical piano Saturday afternoons live on Radio 2UE and at 21, was a founding member of the Ensemble Theatre at Kirribilli in Sydney. Over the next 55 years Lorraine has played 43 roles in various theatre companies all over Australia.
  • Poppy Cave has been involved in the short film industry for many years on both sides of the camera. During her career in Documentary Film Animation as a Visual Effects Production Manager she collaborated with the producers of the Australian AFI award winning documentary “Death of the Megabeasts” and others for Discovery and National Geographic Channels.
  • David Griffiths has worked as an Entertainment Journalist/Reviewer in Australia for over  twenty years now. That time has seen him host the popular X-Wired television program as well as write for magazines such as Buzz Magazine, The Banner, Heavy and Eternity. He has even branched out into writing online for www.subcultureentertainment.com, The Buzz, Media Search and The Book, The Film, The T-Shirt. He also spent four years working as the Entertainment Editor for Entertainment Scene 360.Dave has also worked consistently in radio since he turned 18 and is today the co-host of Melbourne’s 94.1FM’s own breakfast show – The Wednesday Motley Crew. He is also a host of the world famous ‘The Good, The Bad, The Ugly Podcast’ and is the main man behind the ‘Subculture Podcast’. As far as Film Reviewing goes David is a member of AFCA (Australian Film Critics Association and IPRESCI (International Federation of Film Critics)/FIPRESCI (Fédération Internationale de la Presse Cinématographique).
  • Blake Howard is a writer, a podcaster, the editor-in-chief & co founder of Australian film blog Graffiti With Punctuation, but above all he’s a son of Batman. Beginning as a padawan co-host of That Movie Show 2UE and now a member of the prestigious Online Film Critic Society; swaying the Tomato Meter with Rotten Tomatoes approved reviews; Blake loves nothing more than to watch and share the effects of movies.
  • Peter Krausz is a former president of the Australian Film Critics Association, a FIPRESCI-accredited judge for film juries, consultant to the Goethe-Institut for the annual Festival of German Films, judge on various categories for the AFI/AACTA Awards, and judge for the 48 Hour Film Project and Bayside Film Festival. He broadcasts a weekly two-hour film and television program on 3NRG, 99.3FM called ‘Movie Metropolis’, and runs many Q&As for various distributors and cinemas. He also publishes regular film festival reviews on the AFCA website, plus film articles for Independent Education magazine. He recently presented a seminar on the history of science fiction film in Australia at the Con 9 Science Fiction convention in 2013 in Melbourne
  • Vinh Nguyen is a filmmaker whose films Bliss and Handy have been screened nationally and at Cannes, and his festival awards includes Best Film at 48 Green Hours (2011) and Shortcuts (2012). He has a Bachelor of Design in Visual Communications (UTS) and has produced quirky and engaging work for Sydney Theatre Company, Cancer Council and Headspace. He continually pursues to tell riveting stories through a tactile aesthetic and aims to better master his craft. An avid fan of B-movies, Vinh strongly adheres to the work ethics of Bruce Campbell and Sam Raimi. Apart from film, he has a high passion in ping pong, games and cosplay, proudly donning the Captain America uniform while blitzing through a Breaking Bad Marathon.
  • Enzo Tedeschi produced and edited the enormously successful documentaries Food Matters and Hungry For Change, as well as numerous television series, documentaries and award-winning short films with directors such as Carlo Ledesma, Shane Abbess, Marc Furmie, and Andrew Traucki. He has edited and overseen the post-production paths on Channel Nine’s Logie nominated Things To Try Before You Die, and the observational documentary series AFP for Zapruder’s Other Films. Enzo was nominated for an Australian Screen Editor’s Guild Award in 2008 for Best Editing in TV Non-Drama for Gardening For Kids With Madi.

 

The festival will be held on Sunday 16th November, 2014 at Riverside Theatres, Parramatta. For more information please go to www.scififilmfestival.com