Tagged: Sylvia Grace Crim

Summary: 
As a Korean-American man raised in the Louisiana bayou works hard to make a life for his family, he must confront the ghosts of his past as he discovers that he could be deported from the only country he has ever called home.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  18th November 2021 (Australia), 3rd December 2021 (UK), 17th September 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, Canada

Director: Justin Chon

Screenwriter: Justin Chon

Cast: Brad Blanchard (Randy), Martin Bats Bradford (Lajon), Justin Chon (Antonio LeBlanc), Emery Cohen (Denny), Sylvia Grace Crim (Sylvia), Vondie Curtis-Hall (Barry Boucher), Rhonda Johnson Dents (Rhonda), Alexander Garcia (Gulag), Renell Gibbs (Reggie), Jim Gleason (Doctor Keegan), Jacci Gresham (Ms. Jacci), Tyler Henry (Kamal), Altonio Jackson (Quentin aka Q), Sydney Kowalske (Jessie LeBlanc), Ivy Vy Le (Nicole), Susan McPhail (Susanne), Mark O’Brien (Ace), Linh-Dan Pham (Parker Nguyen), Josef A. Pons (Rodrigo), Geraldine Singer (Dawn Landry), Truong Quang Tran (Quoc), Alicia Vikander (Kathy LeBlanc), Toby Vitrano (Merk)

Running Time: 117 mins

Classification: M (Australia), TBC (UK), R (USA)

OUR BLUE BAYOU REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Blue Bayou Review:

Films with the power of Blue Bayou are rare in modern cinema. I’ll admit that when the credits begun to roll I sat there in complete stunned silence. Normally I am the kind of person that turns to my co-host as soon as the credits start and ask them what they thought of the film, but with Blue Bayou we both sat there in stunned silence. Partly because of the power of the film and partly because it is hard to comprehend that in 2021 the story told in Blue Bayou is occurring in the USA nearly every day.

The film centres around the loving couple of tattoo artist Antonio LeBlanc (Justin Chon – Twilight) and physical therapist Kathy LeBlanc (Alicia Vikander – Ex-Machina). They are poor and don’t have much but they have each other and they have their daughter, Jessie (Sydney Kowalske – Girl In The Basement)… and that is enough to make them happy.

Despite the fact that Jessie is from Kathy’s first marriage, to dutiful cop Ace (Mark O’Brien – Arrival), Antonio loves her deeply and the pair share a special bond. Even when he finds out that Kathy is expecting his child he tells Jessie nothing will ever stop him loving her.

But then two events happen that will change things forever. First of all a chance meeting between Antonio and Kathy in a supermarket with Ace and his violently racist partner, Denny (Emory Cohen – Brooklyn), leads to trouble for the couple and deep secrets being revealed. Then Antonio meets the terminally ill Parker Nguyen (Linh-Dan Pham – Mr Nobody) that leads him to ask more questions about his ancestry.

Normally films like Blue Bayou that tug at your heart-strings are told in an almost Hallmark fashion. They are clichéd and you can almost pick every trope and turn before they happen. Blue Bayou isn’t like that though, instead Justin Chon, who is also the film’s director and screenwriter, allow the film to take on a gritty, alternative persona that allows the film to become more hard-hitting and pack an even more powerful punch into its audience’s stomach. Why does it hit so hard? Because Chon is such a talented director that his style of filmmaking seems so natural at times the dialogue and what you are watching are so realistic that you feel like you are watching a documentary.

I’m not going to hold back with this – the story, revealed in the twist of the film, is a story that needed to be exposed to the world and as it turns out Justin Chon was just the right filmmaker to do so. If Chon doesn’t win an Oscar for Blue Bayou, and he really should, then there is no doubt in my mind that one day he certainly will. Not only is his acting in this film award-worthy but his directing certainly is as he has delivered one of the films of the year.

If the Oscars were fair then you would have say that Chon could easily walk away with a swag of Oscars for this film. Best Actor, Best Director, Best Film and Best Screenwriter – and all would be deserved. As much as I marvelled at Chon’s directional skills this film also showcases what a spectacular screenwriter he is as well. This film shows emotion without getting sappy and Chon is a talented enough writer to make sure that none of the film’s twists and turns are revealed before he needs to them. Even better is the fact that he is a mature and brave enough writer to not disappoint the audience with a clichéd Hollywood ending.

This of course is not the Justin Chon show though. As good as Chon’s performance is he is well matched alongside Alicia Vikander who once again reminds cinema audiences that she is well and truly above her Tomb Raider credentials. Like Chon Vikander puts in a truly emotional and dramatic performance that should have tested her limits, but instead she excelled in the role. Together the pair pull off two of the best performances that you are likely to see on the big screen in 2021.

Blue Bayou is not only one of the best films that you will see in 2021, it is also one of the most powerful. This is the kind of film that has you walking away from the cinema angry at just how unjust the world, these are the kinds of films that we need in this world to make a difference. If you loved the power of Nomadland last year be prepared to be floored by the brilliance of Blue Bayou and its creator Justin Chon.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Other Subculture Blue Bayou Reviews:

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Summary: Two women face off as a deadly game called The Hunt goes completly off track.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: TBA

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 12th August 2020

Australian VOD Release Date: 9th April 2020

Country: USA

Director: Craig Zobel

Screenwriter: Nick Cuse, Damon Lindelof

Cast: Hannah Alline (Flight Attendant/Not Stewardess/Kelly), Usmine Ally (Crisis Mike), Alexander Babara (Bojan), Walter Babington (Bandana Man), Ike Barinholtz (Staten Island), Christopher Berry (Target), Reed Birney (Pop), Macon Blair (Fauxnvoy), Steve Coulter (The Doctor), Sylvia Grace Crim (Dead Sexy), Wayne Duvall (Don), Ariel Eliaz (Dino), Betty Gilpin (Crystal), Glenn Howerton (Richard), Jason Kirkpatrick (Rannnndeeee), Jim Klock (Captain O’Hara), J.C. MacKenzie (Paul), Amy Madigan (Ma), Steve Mokate (Sgt. Dale), Kate Nowlin (Big Red), Vince Pisani (Peter), Emma Roberts (Yoga Pants), Sturgill Simpson (Vanilla Nice), Charlie Slaughter (Young Crystal), Ethan Suplee ((Shut The F**k Up) Gary), Hilary Swank (Athena), Dean J. West (Martin), Teri Wyble (Liberty), Tadasay Young (Nicole)

Running Time: 90 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 18 (Thailand)

 

 

OUR THE HUNT MONSTER REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ The Hunt Review:

In a year where people have learnt to embrace films in ways that they haven’t previously the one genre that seems to have topped all others has been the horror genre. While The Wretched topped the US Box Office just before the lockdown Leigh Whannell’s The Invisible Man found itself scoring five star reviews from some of the world’s top film journalists.

While those two results seemed to surprise fans of the genre the film they were eagerly anticipating was director Craig Zobel’s (Compliance) The Hunt. The excitement around the release was hardly surprising – Zobel’s post-apocalyptic thriller Z For Zachariah is one of the most under-rated films of the last decade while The Hunt was the latest film to come out of Blumhouse stable, a production company who rarely produce a dud.

The film itself is basically an adult version of The Hunger Games with some extra quirk thrown in for good measure. The opening scenes of The Hunt pretty much The Hunger Games but do quickly establish that characters like Crystal (Betty Gilpin – Stuber) are involved in a deadly game that has been set up by the mysterious Athena (Hilary Swank – Million Dollar Baby) But what exactly is the game that Crystal has found herself in? And why the hell has Athena set something up some vicious and cruel?

Those are the questions that the audience are asked to explore, but to be honest the road to getting those answers is un-original and at times plain boring. While the screenwriting team of Nick Cuse (Watchmen) and Damon Lindelof (Lost) try to give the film its own originality with some quirky Kevin Smith style black humour it does nothing to lift any interest in the film’s plot at all.

While the idea of losing characters on mass and at a whim throughout the early stages of the film may have made the script look like a horror film with a difference it just doesn’t work on the screen. Introducing characters and then having them killed or disappearing straight away makes it nearly impossible for the audience to get a vested interest in the film. It is also does nothing but waste the talents of quality performers like Emma Roberts (We’re The Millers).

While the film does gain a little bit of traction when it becomes a battle between Crystal and Athena even that comes to a crashing end with a lacklustre finale that any decent horror fan will have seen close a film a million times previously. To be honest that little battle royale comes a little bit too late for the interest of the audience as well. The film’s inability to engage its audience early on really does mean that you never really care for Crystal the way you should and again there are a lot of scenes throughout the film that are just too similar to other recent films like Peppermint.

The only winner out of this film is the star Betty Gilpin. While everyone falls around her her performance as Crystal is enough to at times back you forget the clichés that is holding the film back. She brilliantly delivers whatever is thrown at her – action, gore and black comedy. Her scenes with Hillary Swank are at times the only things making the film watchable and for that Gilpin deserves a lot of credit.

The Hunt never really lives up to the hype that came before it. Fans of genuine horror will give it a wide berth after just one viewing while it’s quirkiness and gore is probably enough to put off the casual cinema goer. If you’re looking for a decent gorey, catch-me-if-you-can horror then bypass The Hunt and try to find a way to watch Tony D’Aquino’s The Furies instead.

 

The Hunt is rated 18. It is available on a number of streaming services and will open in select Thai cinemas on August 12th.

 

 

 

 

 

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IMDB Rating:

The Hunt (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture Entertainment The Hunt Reviews:

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