Tagged: The Beatles

The Walt Disney Studios, Apple Corps Ltd. and WingNut Films Productions Ltd. announced today that Disney+ will bring “The Beatles: Get Back,” a Disney+ Original documentary series directed by Peter Jackson, to fans and music lovers worldwide.
 
Because of the wealth of tremendous footage Peter Jackson has reviewed, which he has spent the past three years restoring and editing, “The Beatles: Get Back” will be presented as three separate episodes. Each episode is approximately two hours in length, rolling out over three days, November 25, 26 and 27, 2021, exclusively on Disney+.
 
“As a huge Beatles fan myself, I am absolutely thrilled that Disney+ will be the home for this extraordinary documentary series by the legendary filmmaker Peter Jackson,” said Bob Iger, Executive Chairman and Chairman of the Board, The Walt Disney Company. “This phenomenal collection of never-before-seen footage offers an unprecedented look at the close camaraderie, genius songwriting, and indelible impact of one of the most iconic and culturally influential bands of all time, and we can’t wait to share ‘The Beatles: Get Back’ with fans around the world.” 
 
Peter Jackson commented, “In many respects, Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s remarkable footage captured multiple storylines. The story of friends and of individuals. It is the story of human frailties and of a divine partnership. It is a detailed account of the creative process, with the crafting of iconic songs under pressure, set amid the social climate of early 1969. But it’s not nostalgia – it’s raw, honest, and human. Over six hours, you’ll get to know The Beatles with an intimacy that you never thought possible.” 
   
He added, “I’m very grateful to The Beatles, Apple Corps and Disney for allowing me to present this story in exactly the way it should be told. I’ve been immersed in this project for nearly three years, and I’m very excited that audiences around the world will finally be able to see it.”
 
Directed by three-time Oscar®-winning filmmaker Peter Jackson (“The Lord of the Rings” trilogy, “They Shall Not Grow Old”), “The Beatles: Get Back” takes audiences back in time to the band’s intimate recording sessions during a pivotal moment in music history. The documentary showcases the warmth, camaraderie and creative genius that defined the legacy of the iconic foursome, compiled from over 60 hours of unseen footage shot in January 1969 (by Michael Lindsay-Hogg) and more than 150 hours of unheard audio, all of which has been brilliantly restored. Jackson is the only person in 50 years to have been given access to these private film archives. “The Beatles: Get Back” is the story of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr as they plan their first live show in over two years, capturing the writing and rehearsing of 14 new songs, originally intended for release on an accompanying live album. The documentary features – for the first time in its entirety – The Beatles’ last live performance as a group, the unforgettable rooftop concert on London’s Savile Row, as well as other songs and classic compositions featured on the band’s final two albums, Abbey Road and Let It Be.
 
An exciting new collaboration between The Beatles and Jackson presented by The Walt Disney Studios in association with Apple Corps Ltd. and WingNut Films Productions Ltd., “The Beatles: Get Back” is directed by Peter Jackson, produced by Clare Olssen (“They Shall Not Grow Old”) and Jonathan Clyde (“Eight Days a Week”), with Ken Kamins (“The Hobbit” trilogy) and Apple Corps’ Jeff Jones (“Eight Days a Week”) serving as executive producers. Jabez Olssen (“Rogue One: A Star Wars Story”) serves as the documentary’s editor, and the music is mixed by Giles Martin (“Rocketman”) and Sam Okell (“Yesterday”).
 
“The Beatles: Get Back” is being made with the enthusiastic support of Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono Lennon and Olivia Harrison. 
 
Ahead of the documentary’s Disney+ debut, Apple Corps Ltd./Callaway Arts & Entertainment will release The Beatles: Get Back book on October 12. Beautifully designed and produced, the 240-page hardcover complements the “Get Back” documentary with transcriptions of The Beatles’ recorded conversations and hundreds of exclusive, never before published photos from the three weeks of sessions. The collectible book will be published in nine international language editions, including English.

Founding KISS guitarist and Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame member Ace Frehley announces the release of Origins Vol. 2, his highly-anticipated second collection of eleven rock ‘n’ roll covers, due out on September 18, 2020. Today, he also releases the first single, a flawless cover of Deep Purple’s 1972 hit, “Space Truckin’” available now on all streaming platforms, and as an official music video.

Recorded at The Creation Lab in Turlock, CA, Frehley recorded guitar, bass, and vocals on “Space Truckin’” with long-time studio drummer Matt Star and keyboard player Rob Sabino (Peter Frampton,  Simon & Garfunkel).

Ace offers, ‘’Space Truckin’ was recorded years ago, and then I just re-recorded some parts and changed it a little. We never ended up putting it on a record, so it was just sitting around. It turned out very well. Rob Sabino is a very accomplished studio musician, and we actually grew up in the Bronx together, so we go way back.”

The official video for ‘Space Truckin” was directed by eOne’s Ken Gullic (VP, Sales & Acquisitions, Music) and animated by Chris Fequiere, the same team behind the “Mission to Mars” music video from Frehley’s Spaceman album in 2018.

Frehley has also re-signed with eOne for more new releases, which extends his original deal signed in 2013. During his tenure, he has released three albums worth of new material, Origins Vol. 2 is the fourth. A new studio album is planned for 2021 with two additional releases to follow.

eOne’s Scott Givens, SVP, Rock & Metal, Music says, “I am thrilled to extend our partnership with Ace Frehley.  He is a core artist for eOne and I look forward to more continued success with him.”

eOne’s Ken Gullic, VP, Sales & Acquisitions, Music, offers, “We were warned, before our first meeting with Ace in 2014, that he’d never deliver an album or get on the plane for that very meeting. He showed up with an early version of Steve Miller’s “The Joker” in hand and then cranked out eleven brand new songs at lightning speed for his first top 10 solo album ever, ‘Space Invader,’ just in time for his Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction as a KISS member in 2014. With nine albums into his vibrant solo career, one that clearly stands on its own, it’s time for Ace to be considered as a Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inducted solo performer too.”

Frehley continues his reflections on a lifetime in music with this release of Origins Vol. 2. No stranger to cover versions throughout his musical history — having recorded, rebranded and repossessed such notable nuggets as ‘New York Groove,’ ‘Do Ya’ and ‘I Wanna Go Back’ throughout his eight previous studio efforts — this new collection presents a thoughtful and exciting selection of songs that inspired and helped shape the legendary guitarist. That spirit of fun is carried through with exquisite execution, and guitar aficionados will enjoy Frehley’s fresh interpretations of these classic songs.

Origins Vol 2. features some extraordinary guests, including Robin Zander of Cheap Trick on Humble Pie’s ‘30 Days In The Hole,’ and former KISS comrade Bruce Kulick on Jimi Hendrix’s ‘Manic Depression.’ Origins Vol.1 alumnus John5 also returns, playing on Cream’s ‘Politician,’ and The Beatles’ ‘I’m Down.’ Finally, the exquisite Lita Ford returns on vocals, this time on The Rolling Stones’ 1968 hit ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash.’ Full tracklisting below.

Track List:
1. Good Times Bad Times (Led Zeppelin)
2. Never In My Life (Mountain)
3. Space Truckin’ (Deep Purple)
4. I’m Down (The Beatles)
5. Jumpin’ Jack Flash (The Rolling Stones)
6. Politician (Cream)
7. Lola (The Kinks)
8. 30 Days In The Hole (Humble Pie)
9. Manic Depression (The Jimi Hendrix Experience)
10. Kicks (Paul Revere & the Raiders)
11. We Gotta Get Out Of This Place (The Animals)
12. She (KISS) [Bonus Track]

Origins Vol. 2 will be the followup to 2016’s Origins Vol. 1, which hit #23 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, and was his second highest-charting solo album and his 4th Top 40 album.

Pre-orders are available today at www.acefrehleyorigins.com — which includes an exclusive 180g Opaque Gold Double LP variant (limited to 1000 copies + download card).

 

Melbourne’s very own Riff Raiders are hitting 2020 with a bang. Aside from heading out on a tour that will see them headline the Kilmore Rock Festival the band also have their vinyl Double A-Side single landing on February 18th through Rue Morgue Records and then release their brand new album Rock ‘N’ Roll Daydream in March.

The band’s debut album Live Like You Mean It was released to critical acclaim and won the band a legion of fans. When we recently sat down to interview Riff Raider’s very own Marty Powell he admitted that it was something that was weighing on their mind as they worked on the new album. “I didn’t feel pressure when I was writing the songs because that felt like a bit of a break-through,” he says. “We were doing a lot of shows and we felt like a band on a run so the songs were coming from excitement and adrenalin so that worked really well.”

“But when it came to recording them we really wanted to approach them differently,” he admits. “I started the album about a year ago and like what happens with other artists – I just wasn’t happy with it and that is why the line-up of the band changed. That was so we could make it as good as we good.”

As we talk about the events that surrounded that moment we talk about what a drastic decision it was to make. “It was a really important decision to make,” agrees Powell. “The guys we were playing with were great at that level but musically if we wanted to go to that next stage we had to do something, and it was pointed out by the producer we were working with at the time. But yeah it was painful. But I thought if we are going to go to all this trouble and we have the best batch of songs that we can come up with then we really have to do them justice.”

“So we decided that we needed a different rhythm section,” he continues. “I think different is a better word than better, we just needed a different style and then I worked with a different producer that pushed it to a whole another level again. But we didn’t rush into it. We did a lot of shows with the new line-up to break in the band again, which I think you can hear on the recordings. It held things up but it also made things better. It also gave me the opportunity to define the songs a bit more and by re-recording them we were able to give everything a second go. That really helped.”

The work of the line-up is clearly evident on the Double A Side that is about to be released by Rue Morgue and they are both tracks that Powell are clearly proud of. “You’ve got Loaded Gun and Best Day Ever,” he explains. “They are the lead tracks off the new album – Rock ‘N’ Roll Daydream. There are two very different sounds of the band on show with these tracks.”

“Loaded Gun has that classic kind of slide, kind of a classic rock sound to it,” he says continuing. “The other track that is there is still rock but I guess it has more of 90s kind of vibe to it… it is a bit more fun. We really wanted to show different sides of the band. It is all rock, the title of the album pretty much explains that, and we aren’t ripping anything off but when I write the songs I always try to think about what kind of rock music I like which is all different styles. So when you listen to the album you hear those different styles as well, and the idea is that this kind of music has been around for a long while so we just try to do songs in this genre. It isn’t exactly re-inventing the wheel but putting more wheels on sale I guess is the best way to describe it.”

The one thing that really strikes you about these two tracks is the catchiness of them Walk away after listening to Best Day Ever and you will be humming it for the rest of the day. “We’re all about hooks,” says Powell laughing. “It’s not even about what we do in the studio, it’s about how we write the track and then arrange it with the band. You get to do that in the studio as well but when you see us live it is there as well. That comes back to that classic type of song-writing, it is heavy but you still want to be able to whistle the tune. That was The Beatles concept – is the song memorable? Playing that kind of music though can be difficult, take Loaded Gun for example, you are holding it back a bit. It’s like AC/DC when you get a band to groove like that it is quite powerful, but that is hard to achieve just smashing away and doing what you like. There is restraint there but you also want that hook side, so you try to go for both.”

Whatever the recipe is that Riff Raiders are working on it obviously works because both Loaded Gun and Best Day Ever are something very special indeed.

 

The year was 1979 and a tiny Irish punk band were about to send out a shockwave that would not only change the genre but forever impact on the wider music scene. Surprisingly the band responsible – Belfast’s very own Stiff Little Fingers – had no idea what they about to do.

How could they? Things were not exactly going the greatest for them. The band had started out in 1977 as a rock cover band called Highway Star but then after a few line-up changes they were introduced to the sound that was punk. That lead to a brief flirtation with the name The Fast before finally settling on Stiff Little Fingers.

The uprising and violence that Ireland was experiencing at the time ended up heavy influencing the early music of Stiff Little Fingers and after recording some of their tracks in a studio normally reserved for the creation of radio jingles the band signed with Island Records, a deal which fell through.

Not to be put off the band released some cassette singles, the ‘cassette bomb’ that was ‘Suspect Device’ did cause some problems at publications it arrived at, and eventually signed with Rough Trade Records, a deal which ultimately saw part of the rise of Chrysalis Records.

That led to the release of their debut album Inflammable Material and the rest as they say is musical history. Audiences took to the album that explored deep topics such as police oppression, sectarian violence and teenage boredom and the result was the first independent album to ever chart in the UK.

“We didn’t think anything about it,” said vocalist Jake Burns who I recently had the pleasure of sitting down and talking to about the anniversary of this stunning album. “I don’t think anybody ever does, but there seemed to be a lot of time to talk about this album. People have said to me ‘did you realise that it was going to be a classic?’ or ‘did you know you know you were recording something special?’ The answer to both of those questions is no!”

“As far as we were concerned we had already been turned by literally every record label in the country. It was only through the good graces of Rough Trade saying ‘you’ve never made an album, we’ve never made an album, so let’s see what happens.’ It was a shot in the dark for them, it was a huge leap of faith for them to take us. But as far as we were concerned we had been shot down by all of these labels so this was our last shot, I think from my point of view I thought that at least if we recorded them then in forty years time when I was sitting down with my grandchildren I could be like ‘here take a listen to what I did when I was young and stupid.’ Of course flash forward forty-two years and I haven’t got any kids, let alone grandkids and I’m talking to you about it instead.”

What Inflammable Material did when it comes to musical history though is not lost on Burns. “The thing did go on to become successful on so many levels. If I knew that was going to become the case though we would have tried to bottle it, it just happened to be the right time and the right place.”

One of the ironies that followed the success of the album was that nearly all of the record labels that originally knocked back the band then came knocking. “Everyone one of them except CBS came back,” says Burns with a laugh. “We heard that CBS didn’t come back because in their words they said ‘we have enough trouble with The Clash’ which I thought was a wonderful thing for them to say about us.”

But yeah everybody else came back and it was a wonderful experience for our point of view because we were as green as grass,” he continues. “We had no experience in the music business at all. Had we been signed straight off the bat we probably would have signed the world’s worst record deal and we would have gone down that path of ‘well we did all this work and we got nothing out of it.’ I was working as an Accounts Clerk before the band took off and I could have been back doing that again, it could been like that. But the deal we did with Rough Trade, who was just as green as us, was done on a handshake that covered the costs and then we split fifty-fifty and by the end of the year the thing had sold 100,000 copies. So when these labels came back to us they were like ‘well we will give you ridiculously large advances’ but the joy of working with Rough Trade was that we didn’t have to wait for the traditional eighteen months to get paid because they were selling them themselves so we were paid straight away… so the one thing we didn’t need from the labels was money but what we did want was control over the albums so we could control what they sounded like.”

“As it turned out Chrysalis were the only label that would give us that, the others were all like ‘we’ll give you seventy five thousand pounds’ and we were like ‘we don’t want seventy five thousand pounds you’re not listening.’ But Chrysalis were like ‘okay’ and we had a really good working relationship with them. We have been pretty lucky though people have normally ‘got’ the band straightaway or have gotten on board pretty quickly so we’ve been pretty lucky.”

Despite that early success it was the deal with Chrysalis that saw Stiff Little Fingers become members of a very different league. “Rough Trade were one of the most major independent labels but all the other bands they had would make a single or do two singles and then go off it never seemed like a long term thing,” Burns explains. “No disrespect to the other bands but there were no rock ‘n’ roll legends there you weren’t going to meet The Beatles when you walked in and then over night we signed with Chrysalis and then I found myself being introduced to Rory Gallagher my hero and we were on the same level as Blondie and the same level as Jethro Tull and I was suddenly like ‘wait a second these are the guys that were in the music magazines I read when I was growing up and they are talking to me like I am there equal.’ That was when I said to myself, damn I guess this is my job now.”

They were obviously the bands that Burns himself were in awe of but over recent years bands such as Bad Religion and Rancid have mentioned that Stiff Little Fingers were a major influence on their early work and that is something you can tell that Burns is incredibly proud of. “That is very flattering,” he says with humility present in his voice. “It is always very flattering when you hear a musician say that because I know how I felt when I first met Rory Gallagher, he was just charm and friendliness personified and if I mentioned what a fan I was he would look embarrassed and say ‘oh, don’t be like that’ so we’re kind of the same. I mean I met Robert Plant from Led Zeppelin, for pete’s sake they don’t get much bigger, and we were doing a television show together… this silly little quiz thing. On the form you filled out before you went on it said ‘what was the first album you ever bought?’ and I wrote Led Zeppelin II which was true and I didn’t know then that Robert Plant was going to be on the show and then he walked into the green room and all eyes turned to him because everyone is saying ‘it’s fucking Robert Plant’ and he stood in the doorway and said ‘who is the idiot who bought my record?’ and I was like ‘me.’”

“I guess because those guys were so cool about it when it first started happening to us we were like ‘okay let’s go get a beer let’s not talk about that’, he says. “Internally though you are impressed, I mean those bands you mentioned we’ve toured with both Rancid and Bad Religion and they are both great bands, so yeah it is very flattening.”

Today Stiff Little Fingers are still together with founding members Jake Burns and Ali McMordie still at the helm. The band will be touring Australia this year and to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of Inflammable Material will be playing the album in full. Yes everybody, this is a return to the good old days of punk.

 

 

You wouldn’t know it if you walked past but nestled away behind some shops in Pier Street Altona sits one of the Melbourne’s most exciting recording studios. Owned and operated by Melbourne musician Mat Robins Coloursound Recording Studio is already beginning to carve out a history for itself in the Melbourne music scene as bands like The Baby Animals and The Dandy Warhols have already used its services.

Talking to Robins you release that this is a man that lives and breathes music, it runs through his veins and the passion in obvious in his voice. “I think like anyone I kind of just fell into it,” he says when I ask how he started out in the music industry. “Everyone has a drive or passion for something and they usually steer a way towards that so for me it was playing in bands as a kid, and I still play in bands now, but when I was playing in bands as a kid I was always looking over the shoulder of the engineer in the studio. I was always very much wanting to know about that stuff but not really understanding it, but over time you just take those small steps forward and you try stuff and you tick off stuff and then that turns into what it is today… whatever that is going to be, for me that is running a studio and managing artists… and I love it, it is a great thing.”

Robins’ musical journey begun with his parents listing to ELO and The Beatles at home and then turned to him starting his first band during his teenage years with the 90s grunge inspired Thimble Eye, today he is a member of Cicada Stone who recently played in a Bushfire Relief Concert for Silverback Touring.

Now he spreads his time across Cicada Stone and Coloursound two things he really enjoys. “Coloursound in its current form has been in Altona for the last ten years, it has been a steady growth procession. My journey started at home, I was recording on anything that I could afford and then I kept upgrading and buying this and buying that, then we moved into a garage and then into a more permanent space here in Altona. The concept was that I didn’t want to set up a studio like everyone else’s studio. Years ago I went into Hothouse Studios in St Kilda for a session and I just loved the idea of a studio being hidden away on a main street, you have life at your fingertips, whatever you need is just outside and all the studios I had been in in the past had been in warehouses or backyards and life was quite difficult.”

“So what I wanted to do was set up a studio that emulated that whole Hothouse concept,” he says continuing. “So when I set up Coloursound it was based on that – it is on a main street, it is hidden away behind shops, it is right near a beach – it’s a really good spot. It’s not even a big studio – I’ve got a control room and a main room for tracking, a couple of isolation booths, but it is amazing what you can get away with in a dedicated small space. I don’t even have a lot of equipment, I’ve got a nice vintage console, some really tasty microphones, but it is not about the equipment it is about how you use the equipment and it is about how you approach the songs.”

As the studio has grown over the years Robins says he has had a number of highlights. “Highlights would have to include getting in anyone,” he says with a laugh. “I think it is a highlight that anyone would go ‘hey, I believe in you and I believe that you can do something with my song.’ That is the greatest compliment, but if I were to drop names we’ve had some great artists in here. Locally we’ve had bands like Palace Of The King and Warbirds come in recently. Some international bands that I’ve had have been I had The Dandy Warhols in here recording drums for an album they did a few years ago… that really blew me away to have a band of such a calibre recording in Melbourne, especially at my place. We’ve had Whitfield Crane come in and when those sessions happen you kind of sit back and think ‘Shit, I never thought I would have people like this in my place.’ I mean I had Suzi DeMarchi in here with The Baby Animals and it is pretty amazing when stuff like that happens.”

Of course along with the highlights come the challenges and Robins says he has faced some of them along the way as well. “Honestly the biggest challenge is keeping the doors open,” he admits. “And I think any studio will say that. On the outside every studio always looks busy, everybody is trying to make themselves look bigger than they are but the reality is it is a small industry here – it is very niche. And with modern technology the way that it is, and I am all for it, modern technology is taking the power out of the studio and into the home and that is a good thing, people should be expressing themselves and doing their own thing but it doesn’t help established studios keep the bills paid. So that has been the biggest hurdle – finding projects where bands want to invest into a studio. And also for bands to invest into albums is getting harder and harder to pick up, bands are happy to do the single or the EP but finding an album project seems to have got harder over the past few years, maybe it is the sign of the times – bands don’t really want to do albums anymore.”

Aside from offering recording services Robins has also started to run workshops at Coloursound where he can pass on valuable information to people looking to learn more about the industry. “Over my time I have learnt a lot,” he says humbly. “I always find that I love talking about this stuff and I just realised that there is nothing wrong with passing on this information so I set up a workshop and it is a good way to fill in the days that aren’t busy here and there is always someone who has reached that point where they need to have a breakthrough and doing this kind of workshop can certainly unlock that for someone. I know I would have loved that when I was teenager trying to learn this stuff at home, if there had been a weekend style workshop that I could have done that would have been great.”

Melbourne is lucky to have a studio like Coloursound so if you are looking to work on that next project you may want to go down and spend some time with Mat Robins to get it done.

So the world famous symphonic metal band that you are in decides to take a hiatus for a year to recover from a heavy touring schedule, what do you decide to do? Well if you are Marko Hietala from Nightwish you decide that it would be the perfect time to sit down and record a solo album.

Yes after the success of Endless Form Of Most Beauty the legendary Nightwish decided to retreat for awhile and Hietala decided that would be the perfect time to work on his debut solo album – Pyre Of The Black Heart. Now with the album about to be released Subculture decided to sit down and have a chat with Hietala about it.

Our conversation starts with Hietala telling me that he has been surprised by how many people have told that they love the album as he feels that it may sound a little different to what many people would expect it to sound like. “I feel like that a lot of people will listen to it and just expect metal,” he says. “And then it turns out to be a pretty versatile album but I guess song wise it does have a heavy metal identity, but it will be different to what they expect and for that I am pleased.”

We continue by talking about the kind of music that Hietala listens to himself and what genres inspire him. “Oh man I listen to so much music,” he exclaims. “Since my youth I have been a metal guy but I also listen to a lot of other stuff. Ever since I was a kid I’ve listened to jazz, Irish folk songs, classic, Elvis, The Beatles… whatever. My father had a very big vinyl collection, he was an enthusiast. He also played guitar and sang so that is where a lot of the versatility comes from.”

“I had been thinking about it,” says Hietala as our discussion turns to the very beginnings of Pyre Of The Black Heart and whether it was something he had been thinking about doing for years. “I had some lyrically stuff written and I had some musical pieces and then when the Nightwish sabbatical came I took all of those bits and pieces. And some were really just pieces of lyrics or pieces of music, suddenly they just all came up and they fit.”

“I had no ideas for a concept or anything like that,” he says continuing. “I just had some personal stories and personal visions written down, I had a bunch of those and I still have some leftover… quite a lot of them as well. I got the most interesting stuff together and then when I had that sabbatical year coming I got some musical friends in that I had known for years and they just really got into the music, so much so that they started to record, mix and produce the album. They also wrote some string sections for  some of the songs so without these guys the album wouldn’t look or sound as it is. They were a big help. I had some ideas and then they had lots of ideas on things. How to incorporate things, how to put drums here and there, they helped so much. This album looks like me but I think it looks like them to.”

I then ask Hietala what it was like sitting down to work with musicians that weren’t from his band after working with Nightwish for so many years. “I guess the biggest change was having to take that leap of faith,” he says after taking a huge pause. “You have to be sure that everything is worthy and you’re not qualified to judge. I had to be able to jump over that fence and once I did it was a great thing. But maybe the biggest change is that when you write for yourself you don’t have to think about the strengths or weaknesses of your band mates, which of course when you write for a band you take that into account. You think well if I take this chord or this melody it will sound more convincing and this time I didn’t have to do that though of course I take the responsibility of putting myself on the line if I put my face and name on it so in that sense it was actually taking on more responsibility and that made it scary.”

As our discussion goes on it also becomes very clear that while the Nightwish machine is going to keep turning this solo album is not going to be a one off for Hietala. “This started as a solo project and it feels like it grew a band of it,” he explains. “That implies that this will continue and that it isn’t over yet, but like I said my next year is full of Nightwish so it is hard for me to see what is going to happen. But there were pieces of music that we also went through and didn’t use on this album… and some of the stuff is pretty good. So there is every chance that we are going to return to this.”

 

You can listen to our full interview with Marko Hietala below.

Pyre Of The Black Heart will be released on January 24th.