Tagged: Upgrade

 

There is no disputing that director/screenwriter Leigh Whannell is one of the kings of modern day horror. The Australian was the writer behind both the Saw and Insidious franchises while in recent years he has also sat in the director’s chair for films like Insidious: Chapter 3 and the under-appreciated Upgrade.

Now Whannell returns as the director/screenwriter/producer of The Invisible Man – a modern day Blumhouse take on one of Universal Pictures most loved horror characters. And as we chat to Whannell in Melbourne we learn that this is not a task that he took lightly.

“I actually wasn’t thinking about doing an Invisible Man movie at all, says Whannell as we begin to talk about the origins of this film. “I had just finished Upgrade and I had been bitten by the action movie bug and I think I was keen to go and shoot the fifty million dollar version of Upgrade. You know we could crash forty cars instead of one car… i was keen to get my Michael Bay on. Then this idea was suggested to me… the idea of doing The Invisible Man and it was not something that I had given any thought to, but then as soon as it was in my mind it was truly an inception.”

“It wouldn’t leave my brain,” says Whannell with a big smile on his face revealing just how excited he was about the product. “It just kept taking up space rent free. And then I just couldn’t stop thinking about it and that is usually the first sign that I am going to make a film – when it just won’t go away. That’s how it came about and then I just went back to Blumhouse and Universal and said that I was interested in doing this and we were off to the races. It was remarkable just how quickly the pieces all came together.”

As we begin to talk craft I ask Whannell whether or not the fact that the idea of the film was planted in his mind rather than him just thinking it up changed the way he went about writing the original screenplay. “It did in the sense that I was aware of this legacy that was behind me,” he says after pausing to think about the question for a moment. “Other people have made Invisible Man movies and I wanted to avoid repeating them. I didn’t want anybody to be able to say ‘well this is just a retread of so and so.’ And so if anything it was more of an awareness to avoid those other movies- that was the biggest thing – trying to take this character and modernise it and make it very new. In other words I wanted to make it feel like no other Invisible Man movie had ever existed and that this was the first. I can’t tell you how many scenes I came up with that I put on the reject pile because I felt that they had been done before.”

Whannell’s version of The Invisible Man takes on a very different voice to any of the Invisible Man films of the past have. Here Whannell explores the dark topic of domestic violence and depicts in a very dark way that few filmmakers have been brave enough to do in the past. “Really early on I knew that I wanted it to be dark,” he explains. “I knew that I wanted to make something that was really tense and suffocating – not light-hearted at all. I didn’t want anything that was frolicking or fun I wanted to make something that was really relentlessly tense and suffocating to the audience.”

“That was a decision that I made very early on and then I began building out the story,” he explains. “The thematic elements of the movie about a woman being in an abusive relationship that just came out organically. As you start to put the pieces out on the table those things just kind of emerge on their own without you forcing them. It was all really organic and that is how it all fell together.”

With the legacy of the Invisible Man being so entrenched in Hollywood history and certain amount of fandom is also there, and that is something that Whannell is more than aware of. “Any movie whether it has a legacy like The Invisible Man or if it is stand-alone like Upgrade makes me nervous,” he says laughing out loud. “Even just thinking about it now is making me nervous. I think it is because you put so much of yourself into a movie an then you release it to the world and they get to judge it and it is just a scary moment. Eventually the nerves ease off once the movie is out there and you can’t do anything about it. Then you a start to relax but right now I am right in the middle of the white hot centre of nerves because it is just starting to get out there.”

 

The Invisible Man opens in cinemas today.

 

The nominees for the 2018 AACTA Awards have just been announced. And the nominees are:

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FILM

Boy Erased

Breath

Cargo

Ladies In Black

Sweet Country

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST INDIE FILM

Brother’s Nest

Jirga

The Second

Strange Colours

West Of Sunshine

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION

Joel Edgerton – Boy Erased

Simon Baker – Breath

Bruce Beresford – Ladies In Black

Warwick Thornton – Sweet Country

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ACTOR

Ryan Corr – 1%

Lucas Gedges – Boy Erased

Damian Hill – West Of Sunshine

Daniel Monks – Pulse

Hamilton Morris – Sweet Country

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ACTRESS

Abbey Lee – 1%

Rooney Mara – Mary Magdalene

Kate Mulvany – The Merger

Julia Ormond – Ladies In Black

Angourie Rice – Ladies In Black

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Simon Baker – Breath

Fayssai Bassai – The Merger

Russell Crowe – Boy Erased

Joel Edgerton – Boy Erased

Josh McConville – 1%

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Elizabeth Debicki – Breath

Natassia Gorey-Furber – Sweet Country

Noni Hazlehurst – Ladies In Black

Simone Kessell – 1%

Nicole Kidman – Boy Erased

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Matt Nable – 1%

James Browne – Brother’s Nest

David Tranter, Steven McGregor – Sweet Country

Leigh Whannell – Upgrade

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Joel Edgerton – Boy Erased

Gerard Lee, Tim Winton, Simon Baker – Breath

Yolanda Ramke – Cargo

Sue Millinken Bruce Beresford – Ladies In Black

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Marden Dean, Rick Rifici – Breath

Peter James – Ladies In Black

Warwick Thornton – Sweet Country

Thom Neal – West Of Sunshine

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING

Dany Cooper – Breath

Mark Warner – Ladies In Black

Nick Meyers – Sweet Country

Andy Canny – Upgrade

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND

Robert Mackenzie – Breath

Liam Egan – Cargo

David Tranter, Thom Kellar, Sam Gain-Emery, Will Sheridan – Sweet Country

P.K. Hooker, Will Files, Andrew Ramage – Upgrade

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

Christopher Gordon – Ladies In Black

Hildur Guonadottir, Johann Johannsson – Mary Magdalene

Dominic Lewis – Peter Rabbit

Jed Palmer – Upgrade

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

Jo Ford – Cargo

Roger Ford, Lisa Thompson – Peter Rabbit

Felicity Abbott, Kate Sharrock – Upgrade

Matthew Putland, Vanessa Cerne – Winchester

 

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN

Wendy Cork – Ladies In Black

Jacqueline Durran – Mary Magdalene

Heather Wallace – Sweet Country

Wendy Cork – Winchester