Tagged: August Diehl

Summary:  In the early years of the 20th century, the Kingsman agency is formed to stand against a cabal plotting a war to wipe out millions.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  6th January 2022 (Australia), 31st December 2021 (Thailand), 26th December 2021 (UK), 22nd December 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: Germany, UK, ,USA, France, Italy

Director: Matthew Vaughn

Screenwriter: Matthew Vaughn, Karl Gajdusek

Cast: Ross Anderson (Corporal Johnstone), Robert Aramayo (Sergeant Major Atkins), Gemma Arterton (Polly), Lucia Jade Barker (Grand Duchess Olga), Joel Basman (Gavrilo Princip), Todd Boyce (Dupont), Daniel Bruhl (Erik Jan Hanussen), Callum Chiplin (Declan Nell), Ron Cook (Archduke Franz Ferdinand Of Austria), Max Count (Young King George), Charles Dance (Kitchener), Dora Davis (Grand Duchess Maria), Harris Dickinson (Conrad Oxford), August Diehl (Vladimir Lenin), Barbara Drennan (Sophie, Duchess Of Hohenberg), Ralph Fiennes (Orlando Oxford), Rosie Goddard (Grand Duchess Anastasia), Matthew Goode (Morton), George Gooderham (Young Tsar Nicholas), Tom Hollander (King George/Kaiser Wilhelm/Tsar Nicholas), Djimon Hounsou (Shola), Rhys Ifans (Grigori Rasputin), Neil Jackson (Captain Forrest), Branka Katic (Tsarina Alix), Ian Kelly (President Woodrow Wilson), Alexandra Maria Lara (Emily Oxford), Nigel Lister (Arthur Zimmerman), Molly McGeachin (Grand Duchess Tatiana), Kristian Wanzl Nekrasov (General Ludendorff), Emil Oksanen (Young Kaiser Wilhelm), Valerie Pachner (Mata Hari), Alexa Povah (Queen Victoria), Alexander Shaw (Young Conrad), Alexander Shefler (Tsareich Alexei), Alison Steadman (Rita), Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Archie Reid), Aaron Vodovoz (Felix Yusupov), Toby Woolf (Young Conrad)

Running Time: 130 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 18 (Thailand), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR THE KING’S MAN REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The King’s Man Review:

One of the best franchises to have surfaced over the past decade has been the very British King’s Man franchise. A kind of mix between James Bond and a Quentin Tarantino film the original film not only made Taron Egerton a household name but also introduced the world of a cinema to a secret organisation that could even see Colin Firth lay waste to a room full of villains.

A second film soon followed and of course fans of the franchise soon started to ask more and more questions about this society and how it began. Well now those questions are answered as writer/director Matthew Vaughn (Kick-Ass) returns to the universe with a prequel aptly titled The King’s Man.

The film chronicles the early days of The King’s Man organisation as widely respected pacifist Orlando Oxford(Ralph Fiennes – Schindler’s List) works with his hired help, Polly (Gemma Arterton – Clash Of The Titans) and Shola (Djimon Hounsou – Guardians of The Galaxy), to investigate a cabal that he believes he is working to keep World War I continuing as long as they can.

While the cabal, which is headed by Morton (Matthew Goode – Stoker) and aided by the likes of Rasputin (Rhys Ifans – The Amazing Spider-Man), are playing out their cunning plan Orlando finds himself wanting to try and end the war anyway he can after his only son, Conrad (Harris Dickinson – Beach Rats), expresses an interest in enlisting.

The term prequel when it comes to an established franchise is often a scary notion but Vaughn has delivered an absolute classic with this film – it is easily better than the second film and gives the audience a great insight into the organisation and the characters that started it.

The power of this film though is that Vaughn is more than willing to try various things throughout the film. Yes, the traditional action sequences that made the first film so special are back, but added to that is the fact that Vaughn has a real handle on characterisation this time. Then there is also the brilliant screenplay, which is co-written by Karl Gajdusek (Oblivion), which goes from tear-jerking moments to laughs with ease and is never afraid to mix genres as well. The scene in which a trio of king’s men take on Raputin has just the right mix of comedy and action and is one of the best cinematic moments of the year, as is one of the film’s biggest twists that we unfortunately can’t talk about here as it would be a spoiler for a major plot point.

The strongest point of this script though is the relationship that Vaughn stets up between Orlando and Conrad. The dynamics between the two shift from a relationship made up care and respect through to a combative nature that makes both explore their views on the Great War. Even better is the fact that Vaughn moves away from Hollywood tropes to bring a close to the storyline that is a sheer stroke of screenwriting genius.

To the credit of the screenwriting team there are no wasted characters in this film either. While a lot of focus is placed on Orlando and Conrad that doesn’t mean that that characters of Polly and Shola are left lacking. Both have enough characterisation to make them interesting enough characters and most audience members will find that the hint that there may be a follow-up film to this one very welcoming.

The brilliant acting performances here though belong to Ralph Fiennes and Rhys Ifans. Fiennes is an acting force in this film – delivering both action and dramatic scenes amazingly well and he is well matched alongside a nearly unrecognisable Ifans playing the notorious Rasputin. The fact that Ifans is able to make the character comical while remaining a fearful villain is credit to both actor and screenplay.

The King’s Man will be loved by fans of the franchise and newcomers alike. The right mix of action and characterisation make this a memorable film while the amazing screenplay and characterisation make this a worthy entry into this already brilliant franchise.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture The King’s Man Reviews:

You can read our review of The King’s Man from The Phuket News here – https://www.thephuketnews.com/the-king-man-excels-82570.php

Trailer:

 

Summary: The Austrian Franz Jägerstätter, a conscientious objector, refuses to fight for the Nazis in World War II.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th January 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Germany, USA

Director: Terrence Malick

Screenwriter: Terrence Malick

Cast: Dimo Alexiev (Nikolai), Leo Baumgartner (Toni Strohhofer), Ulrich Brandhoff (Captain Jurgen), August Diehl (Franz Jagerstatter), Alexander Fehling (Lawyer Feldman), Johannes Gabl (Hessler), Bruno Ganz (Judge Lueban), Adolf Hitler (himself (archival footage)), Bernd Holscher (Judge Ranft), Moritz Katzmair (Martin), Waldemar Kobus (Warden Stein), Jonannes Krisch (Trakl – The Miller), Levan Khurtsia (Levan), Dieter Kosslick (Judge Musshoff), Aennie Lade (Loisi Jagerstatter), Katja Lechthaler (Frau Pate), Monika Lennartz (Frau Schuster), Johan Leyson (Ohlendorf – The Painter), Jasmine Barbara Mairhofer (Frau Pate), Max Malatesta (Max), Karl Marcovics (Mayor Kraus), Ulrich Matthes (Lorenz Schwaninger), Max Mauff (Sterz), Wolfgang Michael (Eckinger), Tobias Moretti (Fr. Furthauer), Thomas Mraz (Prosecuter Kleint), Ida Mutschlechner (Rosi Jagerstatter), Karin Neuhasuer (Rosalia Jagerstatter), Johannes Nussbaum (Josef), Michael Nyqvist (Bishop Fliesser), Valerie Pachner (Fani Jagerstatter), Oliver Pezzi (Fitz), Jurgen Prochnow (Major Schlegel), Nicholas Reinke (Father Moericke), Franz Rogowski (Waldland), Sophie Rois (Aunt Walburga), Andro Sarishvilli (Andro), Matthias Schoenaerts (Captain Herder), Christian Sengeweld (Fr. Kreutzberg), Amber Shave (Rosi Jagerstatter (young)), Ermin Sijamija (Ermin), Maria Simon (Resie Schwaninger), Maria Stadler (Maria), Barbara Stampfl (Maridi Jagerstatter (young)), Benno Steinegger (Corporal Grimm), Michael Steinocher (Officer Kersting), Mark Wasschke (Spitz, the blacksmith), Maria Weger (Maridl Jagerstatter), Martin Wuttke (Major Kiel)

Running Time: 174 mins

Classification: PG (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR A HIDDEN LIFE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

 

 

Kyle McGrath’s Review

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  

 

Other Subculture Entertainment A Hidden Life Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

Night Train To Lisbon

Summary: Raimund Gregorius is a Latin teacher from Berne. Encountering a book by the Portuguese poet and doctor Amadeu de Prado, he takes a train to Lisbon determined to find out more about the writer who appears to ask the very same questions that plague him: the purpose of human deeds and the unrealised potential of each and every life. His restless quest across Lisbon uncovers a contradictory portrait of a clever and brave yet conflicted man who lived at the time of Salazar’s dictatorship.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Germany, Switzerland, Portugal

Director: Bille August

Screenwriter: Greg Latter, Ulrich Hermann, Pascal Mercier (novel)

Cast: Helena Afonso (Maria Prado), Beatriz Batarda (Young Adriana), Nicolau Breyner (Da Silva), Sarah Buhlmann (Catarina Mendes), Tom Courtenay (Joao Eca), Marco D’Almeida (Young Joao), Dominique Devenport (Natalie), August Diehl (Young Jorge O’Kelly), Bruno Ganz (Jorge O’Kelly), Martina Gedeck (Mariana), Bomber Hurley-Smith (Young Bartolomeu), Jack Huston (Amadeu), Jeremy Irons (Raimund Gregorius), Burghart Klaubner (Judge Prado), Melanie Laurent (Young Estefania), Christopher Lee (Father Bartolomeu), Adriano Luz (Mendes), Hanspeter Muller (Mr. Kagi), Lena Olin (Estefania), Ana Lucia Palminha (Young Clotilde), Charlotte Rampling (Adriana de Prado), Jane Thorne (Coltilde), Filipe Vargas (Young Father Bartolomeu)

Runtime: 111 mins

Classification:M

OUR NIGHT TRAIN TO LISBON REVIEWS & RATINGS

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Night Train to Lisbon (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Night Train To Lisbon′: Please check our Night Train To Lisbon review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 61.

Trailer: