Category: War

Summary: 
A family man is drafted to fight in a future war where the fate of humanity relies on his ability to confront the past.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  TBA

VOD Release Dates: 2nd July 2021 (Australia), 2nd July 2021 (Thailand), 2nd July 2021 (UK), 2nd July 2021 (USA)

Country: USA

Director: Chris McKay

Screenwriter: Zach Dean

Cast: Ryan Kiera Armstrong (Young Muri Forester), Rose Bianco (Rose), Piper Collins (Chelsea), Matthew Cornwell (Frank), Kiley Casciano Davis (Yoga Teacher Alexis), Patrick Fleming (Ben), Seychelle Gabriel (Sgt. Diaz), Betty Gilpin (Emmy Forester), Angel Giuffria (Veteran Susan), Caden Graham (Ted), Eric Graise (Veteran Terry), Clyde H. Harris (Larry Sutton), Amanda Hatfield (Samantha), Edwin Hodge (Dorian), Chris Holloway (Lieutenant Marks), Joshua Israel (Jayden), La’Toya Kirkland (La’Toya), Alexis Louder (Diablo), David Maldonado (Dodd), Patrick Malone (Kyle), Jasmine Mathews (Lt. Hart), Mike Mitchell (Cowan), Ashlyn Moore (Katie), Keith Powers (Major Greenwood), Chris Pratt (Dan Forester), Mary Lynn Rajskub (Norah), Sam Richardson (Charlie), Michelle Rivera (Jodie), Zachary James Rukavina (Veteran Palo), Clark Sarullo (Traci), Seth Schenall (Martin), Jared Shaw (Tank), J.K. Simmons (James Forester), Terrence Smith (MEPS Tech Officer Sams), Yvonne Strahovski (Colonel Muri Forester), Amere Stewart (Tina), Felisha Terrell (Conscription Officer Paveza), Alan Trong (Lt. Tran), Chibuikem Uche (Lt. Ikemba), Gisette Valentin (Conscription Officer Dean), Olalu Winfunke (Captain Woods)

Running Time: 138 mins

Classification: 16+ (Australia), 12 (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR THE TOMORROW WAR REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The Tomorrow War Review:

With cinemas still not fully opened around the world one of the biggest movies of the year has just landed straight in everybody’s lounge-rooms. At a budget that topped the $200 million dollar mark The Tomorrow War is no low-budget feature, in fact it is possibly one of the biggest blockbusters to go straight to a streaming service since the Covid outbreak started.

Directed by Chris McKay (The Lego Batman Movie) the film gives obvious nods back to the great action films of the 1990s with some pretty amazing similarities and visuals as films such as Starship Troopers and Waterworld. The good news is though the film also has a screenplay that is much better than the films just mentioned, thanks largely to the work of Zach Dean (24 Hours To Live).

The film itself centres around former Green Beret Dan Forester (Chris Pratt – Guardians Of The Galaxy) who finds himself working as a biology teacher as he struggles to find work within the scientific community. While de-stressing with his family after another employment knock-back he witnesses a major interruption during a World Cup broadcast that alerts today’s society to the fact that in 2051 humanity will be wiped out after a three year war with alien invaders known as Whitespike.

When it is decided that people from today will be sent to the future to help save humanity Dan finds himself drafted. His wife, Emmy (Betty Gilpin – Isn’t It Romantic) and his young daughter beg him to do anything he can to stop himself from being sent. In a last bid effort he goes to see his conspiracy theory loving, ex-military father, James Foreter (J.K. Simmons – Whiplash), to see if he can find away to prevent him from that going.

But when that fails he soon finds himself being sent off to the futuristic war where he finds himself fighting alongside his now fully grown daughter, Colonel Muri Forester (Yvonne Strahovski – The Handmaid’s Tale), who reveals to him that they have been estranged for years.

It is hard not to notice the similarities between The Tomorrow War and Starship Troopers as you watch the film but while the 90s classic tried to create an anti-war storyline The Tomorrow War does nothing of the kind and instead in a way follows the formulas of films like Independence Day that centre around wars against some intergalactic visitors.

The thing that prevents The Tomorrow War becoming just another dull all action affair is the storyline that revolves around Dan and adult Muri. Dean’s screenplay drops little breadcrumbs throughout the film that suggests that the perfect Forester family that we saw at the start of the film have been ripped apart by something. When Muri tells Dan in 2051 that they have been estranged for years it opens up a storyline that is a lot more suspenseful than any of the alien versus human battle sequences throughout the film.

That is not to say that Chris McKay doesn’t make the action sequences quite a spectacle on the screen but to be honest there is nothing here that we haven’t seen previously, and in fact many of the battle scenes look a lot like what we saw in Monster Hunter earlier this year.

A mentioned earlier though it is the father-daughter storyline that makes this film so special though and that vision first planted by Dean in the screenplay is brilliantly brought to life by the performances of Pratt and Stahovski. We know though his work in the Marvel universe that Chris Pratt is an actor that can blend genres together seamlessly. And while the comedic skills that come into play as he portrays Star-Lord are not needed here he does show a more dramatic side to his acting as his character is faced with questions about his future that leave him completely confused. As usual Pratt also comes to the fore during the action sequences.

He is also well supported by Australian actress Yvonne Strahovski who portrays his daughter Muri. The very under-rated actress has been making a name for herself over recent years with her performance in the hit show The Handmaid’s Tale but is was her performance alongside Noomi Rapace in Angel Of Mine that revealed just how talented she is. She again brings the intensity of that role to this film as she mixes dramatic sequences with action brawn with ease.The Tomorrow War is not the most original film to be released this year but if you are looking to waste some time with a big dumb action film it will certainly fill that void. Well worth a look though for the performances of Chris Pratt and Yvonne Strahovski.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Other Subculture The Tomorrow War Reviews:

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Trailer:

Sparke Films has secured the television rights to the “Axis of Time” trilogy, the best-selling novels by John Birmingham. The epic drama television series, tentatively titled “Weapons of Choice” after the first book in the series, is in late development with offers out to first-choice cast. “Weapons of Choice” will explore the far-reaching effects of time, war, and the human condition.
 
Written by Luke Sparke (the Occupation franchise), “Weapons of Choice” is a historical sci-fi military-techno epic drama, based on Birmingham’s best-selling “Axis of Time” trilogy, comprised of “Weapons of Choice”, “Designated Targets” and “Final Impact”.
 
As talent is approached and locations are scouted, Birmingham enthused: “I am stoked to see Luke and his crew turn this favourite, much loved story into something new and madly exciting. His Occupation films are enormous fun and his plans to blast “Weapons of Choice” onto the screen promise even more. More fun, more action, more head-spinning concepts and adventures. I’ve always had a movie of this series running somewhere in my head and reading his script, seeing the artwork, it was like it suddenly exploded all around me.”
 
The pilot is a collaboration between executive producer and showrunner Luke Sparke and co-writer Jay Thames. Carly Imrie and Carmel Imrie will produce, alongside Trimax Media’s Alan Glazier (The Bank Job, Get Smart) and Zachary Garred (Occupation Rainfall).
 
The “Axis of Time” trilogy deals with the radical rip in the fabric of time when a technologically advanced naval task force from the near future is accidentally transported back through time to 1942, landing in the middle of WWII.
 
A military experiment in the near future has thrust an American-led multinational armada back to 1942, right into the middle of the U.S. naval task force speeding toward Midway Atoll, and what was to be the most spectacular U.S. triumph of the entire war.
Thousands die in the chaos, but the changes in the time space continuum have only begun. For the veterans of Pearl Harbor, led by Admiral Spruance, have never seen a helicopter, or a satellite link, or a nuclear weapon. And they’ve never encountered an African American colonel or a mixed-race female British naval commander. While they embrace the armada’s awesome firepower, they may find the twenty-first century sailors themselves far from acceptable.
Initial jubilation at news the Allies would win the war is quickly doused by the chilling realization that the time travelers themselves, by their very presence, have rendered history null and void. Celebration turns to dread when the possibility arises that other elements of the twenty-first century may have also made the trip, and might now be aiding Yamamoto and the Japanese.
 
“When I read John’s “Weapons of Choice” on its release back in 2004, I knew immediately it would make an amazing TV series. That book and the subsequent trilogy became my “Catcher in the Rye”. When I reached out to John with my ideas, I got to work developing the first season. Five years later, we have a series that is extremely relevant and timely with everything going on in the world. There’s never been a better time to look back on our history and see how far we have come, let alone throwing our current culture 80 years back in time and see the two worlds collide. This series is very dear to my heart and will be developed for the screen with loving care,” Sparke said in a statement as he courts interest from multiple networks, streamers and sales agents.
 
Luke Sparke is repped by Seth Nagel Management and John Birmingham by Russell Scovil Galen Ghosh Literary Agency.

Summary: 
Humans in a fascist, militaristic future wage war with giant alien bugs.

Year: 1997

Cinema Release Dates:  5th February 1998 (Australia), 30th December 1997 (Thailand), 2nd January 1998 (UK), 7th November 1997 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: Available in all regions.

Country: USA

Director: Paul Verhoeven

Screenwriter: Edward Neumeier

Cast: Curnal Achillies Aulisio (Sgt. Gillespie), Marshall Bell (General Owen), Ungela Brockman (Corporal Birdie), Clancy Brown (Sgt. Zim), Erik Bruskotter (Breckinridge), Jake Busey (Ace Levy), Christopher Curry (Mr. Rico), Denise Dowse (Sky Marshall Meru), Matt Entriken (Marco), Steven Ford (Lt. Willy), Tami-Adrian George (Djana’D), Seth Gilliam (Sugar Watins), Bruce Gray (Sky Marshall Dienes), Neil Patrick Harris (Carl Jenkins), Kaius Harrison (Cpl. Allen), Michael Ironside (Jean Rasczak), Brad Kane (Lanny), Lenore Kasdorf (Mrs. Rico), Matt Levin (Kitten Smith), Blake Lindsley (Katrina), Dina Meyer (Dizzy Flores), Patrick Muldoon (Zander Barcalow), Denise Richards (Carmen Ibanez), Anthony Ruivivar (Shujimi), Amy Smart (Pilot Cadet Stack Lumbreiser), Brenda Strong (Captain Deladier), Teo (Corporal Bronski), Casper Van Dien (Johnny Rico)

Running Time: 129 mins

Classification: MA (Australia), 18 (UK), R (USA)

OUR STARSHIP TROOPERS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Starship Troopers Review:

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Starship Troopers Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Summary:  In the puppet state of Manchukuo in the 1930s, four Communist party special agents, after returning to China, embark on a secret mission. Sold out by a traitor, the team find themselves surrounded by threats on all sides.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 1st May 2021 (Australia), 30th April 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: China

Director: Yimou Zhang

Screenwriter: Yongxian Quan

Cast: Jiayin Lei, Naiwen Lei, Haocun Liu, Hailu Qin, Yi Sha, Ailei Yu, Hewei Yu, Hanyu Zhang, Yi Zhang, Yawen Zhu

Running Time: 120 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia)

OUR CLIFF WALKERS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Cliff Walkers Review:

As a film lover I have never really been much of a James Bond fan. As a kid I can remember sitting down with my father and watching Bond films with him. Dad was a Bond connoisseur and I remember sitting there wishing I could get as much enjoyment out of them as he seemed to. But I never did, instead all I could ever see was a cheesy character in a world that never seemed real.

As a result when I was growing into a film lover myself I rarely gave much acknowledgment to spy films in general. That as it turned out was a pretty stupid thing to do because as I have found out over the years there are some brilliant spy films out there that don’t feature Bond, what have I also learnt though is that I prefer my spy films to be more on the realistic side of things.

When it comes to realism you can’t go past the brand new Chinese spy thriller Cliff Walkers. Set in Northern China during the 1930s it tells the story of four spies sent behind the Japanese enemy lines to conduct a mission that will allow the world to see the Chinese people’s suffering.

The group led by Zhang Zianchen (Zhang Yi – The Sacrifice) soon finds themselves in a position where they no longer who they can trust. This tightens the bond between Wang Yu (Qin Hailu – Return Ticket), Chu Liang (Zhu Yawen – Red Sorghum) and Xiao Lan (Liu Haocun – One Second) but also makes every move they make dangerous, especially when they find themselves separated and having to try think what they ruthless enemy will do next.

Director Yimou Zhang (House Of Flying Daggers) does an amazing job bringing a naturalistic style to this film. The scenes shot in deep snow look so real as an audience member you find yourself shivering and even the car chases involving historical cars look sensational on the big screen – and while Hollywood directors often go easy on historical cars Zhang does not.

What lifts this film to a whole new level though is the suspensefulness that creeps through this film from start to finish. From the moment the four agents land in Northern China their lives are in danger and it shows on the screen. Watching the film you find yourself trying to guess whether the next person they meet is bad or good, and to the credit of the screenplay the film never gives that away until it absolutely needs to. The result is some wonderful ‘golden-age-of-cinema’ moments when characters suddenly reveal a gun and their true colours.

I was also amazed by some of the acting performances in the film. Yu Hewei (Three Kingdoms) is sensational as the ambiguous Zhou Yi and part of the fun of this film is trying to work out whether he is good or bad. There is also a stand-out performance by Liu Haocan who brilliantly plays the innocent but deadly Xiao Lan – so interesting is her character that you almost wish the film’s producers would do some spin-offs centring around her.

I feel that I do have to warn people that there are some hard to watch scenes in Cliff Walkers. Some of the torture sequences may be hard for some audience members to watch, but if you are an avid fan of thrillers then this is one film that you certainly shouldn’t miss.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Impasse (2021) on IMDb

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Trailer:

British filmmaker Andy Goddard chats to Subculture about his brand new World War II thriller Six Minutes To Midnight which hits cinemas tomorrow.

In the interview Goddard chats about what it was like researching such a little known piece of war history and what it was like working with Eddie Izzard and Dame Judi Dench.

You can take a listen to the full interview here:

Thanks to Defiant! Screen Entertainment we here at Subculture have 5 DVD Copes to giveaway of the brand new action film – Redemption Day.

The film stars Gary Dourdan, Serinda Swan, Ernie Hudson, Martin Donovan, Robert Knepper, Samy Naceri and Andy Garcia.

To enter simply go to the Subculture Entertainment Facebook page – then like it and private message the code word ‘Redemption’ to us.

Redemption Day is available on DVD now.

Summary: A female pilot is met with hostility when she joins an all male crew during World War II. However the issues between them soon pale into insignificance when they discover they have a ‘monster’ on board.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 14th January 2021 (Australia)

VOD Release Dates: 1st January 2021 (USA)

Country: New Zealand, USA

Director: Roseanne Liang

Screenwriter: Max Landis, Roseanne Liang

Cast: Byron Coll (Terrence Taggart), Beulah Koale (Anton Williams), Chloe Grace Moretz (Maude Garrett), Callan Mulvey (John Reeves), Nick Robinson (Stu Beckell), Taylor John Smith (Walter Quaid), Benedict Wall (Tommy Dorn), John Witowski (Bradley Finch)

Running Time: 83 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), R (USA)

OUR SHADOW IN THE CLOUD REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Shadow In The Cloud Review:

Shadow In The Cloud is the kind of film that doesn’t know what it wants to be when it grows up… and I think I like it that way. As a film it is as much a monster horror as it is a war film and it is just as much sci-fi/fantasy as it is a thriller… yes, it is a very hard film to try and pigeon-hole. That all gets even trickier when I point out that three-quarters of the action of the film takes place in a small section of a place that barely gives leads actress Chloe Grace-Moretz (Kick-Ass) room to physically move.

Moretz plays Maude Garrett a young woman who boards an Air Force plane in New Zealand right at the height of World War II. The all male crew which include John Reeves (Callan Mulvey – Captain America: The Winter Soldier) and Anton Williams (Beulah Koale – The Last Saint) are suddenly put out by having a ‘dame’ on their plane. Most make disgusting and degrading comments about what they would like to do to the ‘bird’ with very few making any effort to protect her. The general consensus is that they certainly don’t want a woman on their plane when they are already running such a mundane mission.

Maude’s only saving grace is the mystery surrounding the highly secretive package that she is carrying and the fact that she carries orders from a high ranking officer that the others fear. With very little space on board the flight though they stow Maude away from the rest of the crew and it is only then that secrets start to be revealed as she is one of the first to spot the ‘gremlin’ that is ripping apart the plane and the fact that they are being shadowed by enemy planes.

I am still a little confused at what director Roseanne Liang (My Wedding And Other Secrets) was trying to create with this film? Was she trying to turn Chloe Grace Moretz into an action hero like we recently saw with Milla Jovovich in Monster Hunter or was she trying for something a little more. Certainly there is something that I liked about this film despite some of its weaknesses. I loved the twists and turns that the plot took as secrets started to be revealed – yes they are kind of hard to believe but at the same time I was watching a movie where a winged creature was attacking a plane as well.

What I do know is that the action worked and we saw a new string in the bow of the acting talents of Moretz. At times here she is asked to put in a theatre like performance in a tight space while also playing an action lead – a weird mix that I dare say would not be able to be pulled off by many performers out there. The creature looks amazing, no surprise there seeing it was created by Weta Workshop, but the film is sometimes let down by its cheesy soundtrack and at times dodgy looking CGI which I guess I was supposed to over-look as part of the film’s steam-punk vibe.

Liang also successfully makes her point about sexism in the workplace. What the all male crew (who for a majority of the film are reduced to voices over a radio) say about Maude is disgusting and I am pretty sure it would have even the most hardened chauvinist seeing the errors of his ways. She also reveals aside of history that a lot like to ignore – the role of women during the World Wars… no they were not all at home darning socks.

At the end of the day Shadow In The Cloud does work. The action sequences on board the plane suggest that Liang is a director that we need to be watching in the future while the final battle sequence may have been simple but it is exactly what I felt was needed to finish off the film.

This film once again reminded me of the acting force that is Chloe Grace Moretz and has made me place Roseanne Liang on my list of directors to watch in the future. Shadow In The Cloud might be a mixing of genres but it is certainly worth the admission fee at the box office.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Shadow in the Cloud (2020) on IMDb

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Trailer:

Summary: A respected Army leader suddenly finds herself in a battle of life and death in a mysterious world where humans are prey for other-worldly creatures.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 1st January 2021 (Australia), 31st December 2020 (Thailand), 29th January 2021 (UK), 18th December 2020 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: China, Germany, Japan, USA

Director: Paul W.S. Anderson

Screenwriter: Paul W.S. Anderson, Kaname Fujioka (video game series)

Cast: Jin Au-Yeung (Axe), Aaron Beelner (Palico), Diego Boneta (Marshall), Meagan Good (Dash), Josh Helman (Steeler), Tony Jaa (The Hunter), Milla Jovovich (Artemis), Ron Perlman (Admiral), Nic Rasenti (Sergeant Roarke), Jannick Schumann (Aiden), T.I. (Link), Hironi Yamazaki (Handler)

Running Time: 99 mins

Classification: M (Australia), TBC (Thailand) 12A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR MONSTER HUNTER REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Monster Hunter Review:

While a film is often judged by the way that it is received during the Awards season there are times when the best feeling in the world is to sit down a watch a film that is never going to even be mentioned during the illustrious awards period. Yes, it is great to sit down and watch a film that challenges you or makes you think, but at other times all you really want to do is sit down, turn your brain off and watch something dumb yet enjoyable. That is where films like Monster Hunter come into the picture.

Based on the popular video game franchise Monster Hunter sees director Paul WS Anderson (Alien vs Predator) once again re-united with his real-life wife Milla Jovovich (The Fifth Element) after the duo made four Resident Evil movies together.

The storyline is basic. Jovovich plays Lt. Artemis a strong but caring solider who is well-respected by her colleagues who serve under her. While out a mission looking for a missing team Beta team they suddenly find themselves stuck inside a powerful storm that somehow pushes them through a gateway to another dimension where the likes of Admiral (Ron Perlman – Hellboy) are stuck in an everlasting race to survive as they hunted by other-worldly creatures.

As Artemis’ crew drop like flies (that isn’t a spoiler it pretty much happens in the first 20 minutes of the film) she suddenly finds her only help can come from weather-beaten warrior known to the audience only as The Hunter (Tony Jaa – Ong-Bak). The only problem is that while they rely on each for survival they also don’t trust each other.

Chances are if you have enjoyed what Anderson has done as a filmmaker with the Resident Evil franchise over the years then you will also enjoy Monster Hunter. The film is pretty much action sequence after action sequence yet somehow it also makes The Hunter and Artemis likeable characters. The fact that you can tell that Jovovich and Jaa obviously got on well off-screen makes for a chemistry on screen that just can’t be manufactured.

For me the film’s biggest weakness was that it didn’t allow us long enough in the world that it had set up. Outside of The Hunter and Artemis most of the characters are ‘missing’ for a huge chunk of the film which means the audience never really gets a chance to know other interesting characters like Admiral and his team.

The ending is insanely rushed to the point that you almost wish that Anderson had adapted this into a television series rather than a movie and as the final credits role you really do find yourself hoping that the movie becomes a franchise so you get a chance to share more adventures with these characters and take another trip into this world that leaves more questions about it than answers.

The key to this film working though is the amazing visuals created by Anderson and his team. When it comes to epic action sequences there are few in the cinema world that can do what Anderson does. Even when the Resident Evil franchise felt like it had thrown away any scrips or plot you could always guarantee that Anderson’s action sequences would be out of this world, and the same happens here. Add that to the fact that Anderson gives this film a feel like it is a war film with monsters just thrown in and it is not hard to see why this film is going to become a guilty pleasure for a lot of action film lovers out there.

If you are looking for a film that will keep you entertained without making you think these holidays then Monster Hunter is the film for you. Yes it has huge action sequences, lovable heroes and reveals a unique pairing of Jovovich and Jaa but do be prepared for a film where the ending is slightly rushed but will leave you wanted more. Monster Hunter is far from the perfect film but is certainly enjoyable for those of us who like action films.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Fatman (2020) on IMDb 5.9/105.9/10

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Trailer:

Summary: During World War II a group of soldiers are ask to take a ‘break’ at a mansion once taken over by the Nazis. The stay at the mansion is not exactly what they expected though.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: TBA

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian VOD Release Date: 5th August 2020

Country: UK

Director: Eric Bress

Screenwriter: Eric Bress

Cast: Skylar Astin (Eugene), Laila Banki (Mrs. Helwig), Kyle Gallner (Tappert), Vivian Gray (Ann), Shannon McKain (Lieutenant Morgan), Yanitsa Mihailova (Christina), Matthew Reese (Sergeant Elks/Echo 11), Alan Ritchson (Butchie), Theo Russi (Kirk), Brenton Thwaites (Chris), Shaun Toub (Mr. Helwig), Billy Zane (Dr. Engel)

Running Time: 94 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia)

OUR GHOSTS OF WAR REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Dave Griffiths’ Ghosts Of War Review:

While a lot has happened during 2020 it seems that this is the year where filmmakers realised that you can make a horror film set during World War II without it turning into something schlocky. Of course earlier this year we were delivered the sensational Blood Vessel and now director Eric Bress returns to the director’s chair for the first time in sixteen year with Ghosts Of War.

To me Bress has had one of the most unusual careers in Hollywood that you could imagine. He first amazed me as a filmmaker with the captivating The Butterfly Effect back in 2004 and then as a screenwriter kick-started one of highest grossing horror franchises ever with Final Destination. Despite the success of these films though Bress never returned to the director’s chair – not even with his hit TV series Kyle XY. Now Bress returns to a chair that probably should be considered his throne, and it makes you wonder what we have missed out on while this talented filmmaker has been locked away in the writer’s room.

Ghosts Of War sees five American soldiers including Chris (Brenton Thwaites – Maleficent), Eugene (Skylar Astin – Pitch Perfect) and the mysterious Tappert (Kyle Gallner – American Sniper) arrive at a French Chateau towards the end of World War II. While they see the posting as a cushy place to get some respite they are soon shocked to learn that the chateau was the site of a Nazi atrocity that has left some ghosts looking for retribution behind.

The real reason why I loved Ghosts Of War is something that can’t mention here as I hate reviewers who spoil films. All I will say is that this is a decent supernatural thriller that contains a twist that nobody will see coming win a million years. It is that twist that once again reminds me why Eric Bress is such a fascinating filmmaker.

I remember that there something amazing about The Butterfly Effect the first time I watched it. It was a film that too its audience on a journey of twists and turns and you never really knew where you were going to end up. It was a good strange, the kind of strange that makes Christopher Nolan (Inception) the cinematic God that he is. That same feeling is conjured up with Ghosts Of War – a film that sees the suspense level continue to rise throughout before leaving the audience with a finale that they could never predict.

Also making Ghosts Of War memorable is the fact that despite the supernatural element Bress doesn’t just simply let his characters be walking clichés. Many screenwriters would have taken the easy route here and made the five soldiers a blend of each other, that isn’t Bress’s style though and instead he gives each character a personality, strengths and weaknesses. That of course endears to the audience which again raises the suspense through the roof.

With great special effects, interesting characters and a sensational plot that ends with a bang there is a lot to love about Ghosts Of War. In a lot of ways the horror elements of the film are some old school ‘ghostly’ scares but it is the interesting plot points that Bress throws into the mix that makes this film so different to what we have seen in the past. There is no doubt about it this film shows why we need to see more cinematic magic from Eric Bress over the next few years.

Kyle McGrath’s Ghosts Of War Review:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Ghosts of War (2020) on IMDb

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You can view our review of Ghosts Of War that was published in The Phuket News here – https://www.thephuketnews.com/ghosts-of-war-a-deft-mix-of-war-horror-78203.php

Trailer: