Category: Biography

Summary: A corporate defense attorney takes on an environmental lawsuit against a chemical company that exposes a lengthy history of pollution.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th March 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Todd Haynes

Screenwriter: Mario Correa, Matthew Michael Carnahan, Nathaniel Rich (newspaper article)

Cast: Jim Azeelvandre (Jim Tennant), Bucky Bailey (himself), Aidan Brogan (Teddy Bilott (aged 12-14)), Jacob Bukowski (Tony Bilott (aged 4)), Graham Caldwell (Teddy Bilott (aged 3-5)), Bill Camp (Wilbur Tennant), Bruce Cromer (Kim Burke), Kevin Crowley (Larry Winter), Denise Dal Vara (Sandra Tennant), Marcia Dangerfield (Grammer), Bella Falcone (Crystal Tennant (aged 11-13)), Mikel Furlow (Silas Pfeiffer (aged 5)), Brian Gallagher (David), Victor Garber (Phil Donnelly), Jeffrey Grover (Edward Wallace), Richard Hagerman (Joe Kiger), William Jackson Harper (James Ross), Beau Hartwig (Tony Bilott (aged 10-11)), Anne Hathaway (Sarah Bilage Bilott), Scarlett Hicks (Amy Tennant (aged 10-12)), Louise Krause (Carla Pfeiffer), Elizabeth Marvel (Dr. Karen Frank), Mary Mengelkoch (Dr. Mary-Sue Kimball), Sydney Miles (Laura Doggett), Barry Mullholland (Charles Holliday), John Newberg (Dr. Gillespie), Bill Pullman (Harry Dietzler), Tim Robbins (Tom Terp), Mark Ruffalo (Rob Bilott), Mike Seely (Dr.Brooks), Nathan Slaughter (Teddy Bilott (aged 7-10)), Keating P. Sharp (Charlie Bilott (aged 11-12)), Abi Van Andel (Kathleen Welch), Mare Winningham (Darlene Kiger)

Running Time: 126 mins

Classification: M (Australia)

 

 

OUR DARK WATERS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ Dark Waters Review

Few films will have the impact on their audience that Dark Waters does. I’d be lying if I said the film didn’t get to me – actually I kind of felt physically ill as the credits rolled. That is in no way a reflection of the quality of the film, my feeling came solely from what the movie had just educated me about. See Dark Waters tells us about something that affects our everyday life but something perhaps most of us don’t even know about. To be brutally honest Dark Waters is perhaps one of the most important films that you should see this year… no make that this is a film you MUST see.

Directed by Todd Haynes (I’m Not There) the film tells the true story of lawyer, Rob Bilott (Mark Ruffalo – The Avengers). Bilott worked for a law firm who represented chemical companies but has his entire world turned upside down when a farmer named Wilbur Tennant (Bill Camp – Joker) walks into his office carrying a box of video tapes he says will support his claim that one of America’s biggest chemical companies, DuPont, is poisoning his farm.

While at first reluctant to take on the case Bilott decides he will after going to visit the farm and talking to his own Grandmother about what has happened. Despite his own wife (Anne Hathaway – Les Miserables) and his boss (Tim Robbins – The Shawshank Redemption) thinking that the case may have ramifications for him Bilott continues on believing that his friendship with DuPont’s lawyer, Phil Donnelly (Victor Garber – Alias) will ensure a smooth case that will lead with a payment to the Tennant family. However as Bilott begins to investigate the case DuPont start to act more aggressively towards him and it soon becomes clear that the case is much bigger than anyone could ever have predicted it would.

Dark Waters is the kind of movie that could have become a sticky trap for director Todd Haynes as a filmmaker. While being a very important whistleblower movie exposing a truth that the world needs to know about for the most part this film is a courtroom drama. At times it is not even that – as there are times when this is a movie literally about a man going through box after box of paper in a bid to try and find what he needs before he can even go to court. How Haynes makes that watchable is the feat of a very great filmmaker indeed. There are even times in this movie where he has to deliver an information dump – and he even makes that something gripping to watch.

Haynes finds suspense in things where there shouldn’t be suspense. The fact that he is able to get the audience on the edge of their seat simply because a character is walking to their car after a mundane meeting is some pretty damn fine filmmaking. Even the scenes of Ruffalo unpacking boxes becomes moments of true intrigue as the audience keeps watching wondering when or if he will ever find that elusive piece of the pie that he needs.

The fact though that this is a movie that impacts us all is something though that not even a filmmaker can manufacture. We’ve all used Teflon with our cooking, hell I can even remember my mother being proud of the fact that she owned pots and pans with Teflon in them. And that is what makes this film some spine-chilling – it is a movie that involves all of us and luckily Haynes is the filmmaker who has decided to tell the world the truth about what exactly happened here… a brave move indeed.

Some people may criticise the film for the fact that some actors and actresses get under used, but I did not see that as an issue at all. Yes, Anne Hathaway does not appear in many scenes early on in the film but that seems to add power to the scenes that she does appear in later in the film. Her scene with Tim Robbins where she scolds him for the way that she has been treating her on-screen husband, his employee, is one of the most powerful scenes in the entire movie and you can easily why the casting team wanted an A-Grade actress in the role.

Then of course there is Mark Ruffalo. Of course now for a generation of film-goers he will be known as The Hulk, but it is films like Dark Waters that reminds us what a great character he is. Going into this film I was a little worried that perhaps I would feel like I was simply watching Mark Ruffalo, but just like he did in the under-rated Infinitely Polar Bear Ruffalo totally absorbs his character and puts in a stunning performance that is worthy of a few award wins along the way.

There is no doubt that Dark Waters is a gripping film made even better by a filmmaker who found the perfect way to bring an important yet potentially dull storyline to the cinema in a creative and entertaining way. Haynes brings in moments of true suspense and mixes them with moments of true genius as he finds an interesting way to even get scientific information across to his audience. There are moments when Dark Waters hits its audience like a sledgehammer right between the eyes and in the end it becomes one of the must see films of 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

Kyle McGrath’s Dark Waters Review

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

 

IMDB Rating: 
Dark Waters (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Dark Waters Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

 

Summary: American security guard Richard Jewell saves thousands of lives from an exploding bomb at the 1996 Olympics, but is vilified by journalists and the press who falsely reported that he was a terrorist.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: 13th February 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Clint Eastwood

Screenwriter: Billy Ray, Marie Brenner (article), Kent Alexander (book), Kevin Salwen (book)

Cast: Muhammed Ali (himself – archive footage), Ronnie Allen (Kenny Rogers), David An (Ken), Nina Arianda (Nadya Light), Matthew Atchley (FBI Agent Doug Wall), John Atwood (Mr Brenner), Kathy Bates (Bobi Jewell), Jonathan Bergman (Jerrod Braden), Kellan Boyle (Lonny), Brian Brightman (Zoeller), Tom Brokaw (himself – archive footage), Bill Clinton (himself – archive footage), Alex Collins (Max Green – APD), David de Vries (John Walter), Wayne Duvall (Richard Rackleff), Luke Georgecink (Rob), Ian Gomez (Dan Bennet), Will Gonzalez (Agent Rosario), Charles Green (Dr. W. Ray Cleere), Garon Grigsby (Bryant Gumbel), Jon Hamm (Tom Shaw), Paul Walter Hauser (Richard Jewell), Alan Heckner (Bill Miller – GBI), Izzy Herbert (Mariah Braden), Dylan Kussman (Bruce Hughes), Kelly Collins Lintz (Mrs. Braden), Eric Mendenhall (Eric Rudolph), Niko Nicotera (Dave Dutchess), Michael Otis (Mr. Braden), Desmond Phillips (Mike Silver – APD), Mike Pniewski (Brandon Walker), Grant Roberts (Will Jones – APD), Sam Rockwell (Watson Bryant), David Shae (Ron Martz), Billy Slaughter (Tim Barker),Aaron Strand (Joe Nobody), Robert Treveiler (Patrick Williams),  Olivia Wilde (Kathy Scruggs), Mike Wilson (Forsythe), Olaolu Winfunke (Eli Gradestone)

Running Time: 131 mins

Classification: M (Australia)

 

 

OUR RICHARD JEWELL REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review

Richard Jewell! It should have been a simple true crime story but somewhere in this crazy universe that we call modern times it became one of the most controversial films of 2019. From journalists questioning the validity of the story surrounding the films main protagonist through to director Clint Eastwood’s political alignment being brought into the arguments against the movie; it seemed everybody had an opinion on the film before it even hit cinema screens.

The result was some people staunchly taking a stance against the film while many others had their curiosity peaked and went to see it in order to discover which side of the argument was on the ball. Whatever the reasons were behind people going to see Richard Jewell the end game was they saw one of the most powerful films of the year – a film that once again reminded us why Eastwood is one of the best directors in modern cinema.

Here Eastwood teams up with Oscar nominated screenwriter Billy Ray to tell the story of Richard Jewell a man who discovered that one newspaper article can turn from hero to villain in just a few paragraphs. Jewell (played by Paul Walter Hauser) was an over-ambitious security working at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. While on duty one night at an Olympic concert he discovered a suspicious bag and quickly identified it as a bomb. Before the bomb could be disarmed it exploded killing some of the nearby concert goers while injuring many others.

At first Jewell was labelled hero – a man whose actions saved the lives of many of the people that had already been evacuated. That all changed a few days later though when journalist Kathy Scruggs (Olivia Wilde) published a story leaking the information that Jewell was the FBI’s main suspect. The result was a media circus and flurry of hatred aimed Jewell and his distressed mother (Kathy Bates) while the only person willing to defend them and their rights was under-prepared lawyer Watson Bryant (Sam Rockwell).

Over the past few years Eastwood has perfected a film-making style that sees him bring a sense of realism to the screen that at times makes the audience feel like they are watching a documentary. While with The 15:17 To Paris he used real soldiers rather than actors with Richard Jewell Eastwood enhances the suspense of Ray’s script to the point where you soon find yourself wondering whether or not Jewell is guilty or innocent despite having seen the night play out for us.

Eastwood allows the film to explore every aspect of the story at hand. He shows us why Jewell became a person of interest for the FBI while also showing us the desperation that led to Scruggs breaking the story in the first place. More importantly Eastwood also bears all about Jewell himself even revealing things like the fact that Jewell while working as a college security guard illegally pulling over speeding drivers while ‘posing’ as a Police Officer. To say this is a warts and all portrayal of all the characters involved is an understatement.

Suspense aside what lifts Richard Jewell to the highest echelon of modern day cinema are the performances of its cast. Every scene between Hauser and Rockwell is sheer brilliance. Rockwell matches his stunning performances in classic films like The Way Way Back and Moon and again shows why he is an under-rated great. But here even he is over-shadowed by the performances of Hauser and Bates whose portrayals of people pushed to the emotional limit is at times harrowing to watch.

The true power of Richard Jewell though is the fact that this is one movie that leaves you never being able to look at the media in the same light again. While people may have been critical of the film being made they miss the point that Eatwood and Ray are trying to make as filmmakers – always try to find out the truth about what you are watching. Richard Jewell is a modern day, suspenseful thriller that will stay with the viewer for a long time to come.

 

 

 

 

Kyle McGrath’s Review

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

 

IMDB Rating: 
Richard Jewell (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Richard Jewell Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

 

Poised to thrill audiences around the nation, the Alliance Française French Film Festival has today unveiled the full line-up for its eagerly anticipated 31st season at www.affrenchfilmfestival.org

Spreading its cinematic stardust across 8 cities and 4 satellite locations, the Festival, which is proudly presented by the Alliance Française in association with the Embassy of France in Australia, Unifrance Films and screening partner, Palace Cinemas, will commence its national tour from 10 March until 19 April and is set to thrill audiences with a stupendous selection of 49 contemporary and classic French films, many enjoying their Australian premiere.

 We’re also delighted to announce that dynamic filmmaker, Justin Kurzel (The Snowtown Murders, Macbeth, True History of the Kelly Gang), who has long taken inspiration from French cinema, will be the 2020 Festival Patron.

 Additionally, acclaimed director/actor, Zabou Breitman, whose lyrical, animated drama, The Swallows of Kabul (Les hirondelles de Kaboul), has won plaudits from critics and audiences alike on the international film festival circuit, will be visiting Melbourne to introduce a screening of this, her latest feature, which she directed with Éléa Gobbé-Mévellec. This special Festival event is slated for the evening of Tuesday 17 March at Palace Cinema Como, and will be followed by a filmmaker Q&A.

 On a more sombre note, this year has already experienced horrific bushfires ravaging our land and robbing so many of their lives and homes.  The Alliance Française, and venue partners thereby invite you to join us in helping those impacted by this tragedy by supporting special previews of How to Be a Good Wife and In the Name of the Land (both screening courtesy of Palace Films) to be held in all capital cities on 9th and 10th of March.  100% of tickets sales for these sessions will be donated to the Australian Red Cross Bushfire Appeal and Rural and Remote Mental Health.

And in celebration of mankind’s great capacity for kindness and compassion – which often comes to the fore in times of crisis – the Festival will launch the 2020 season with The Extraordinary (Hors normes)one of the most gloriously uplifting films to emerge from France in recent years, which will screen courtesy of Madman Entertainment.

 The latest feature from renowned filmmakers Olivier Nakache and Éric Toledano (who delighted with The Intouchables and C’est la vie!), The Extraordinary is inspired by a true story and was honoured as the Closing Night Feature at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival. For twenty years, Bruno (Vincent Cassel) and Malik (Reda Kateb) have run two separate non-profit organizations where they train young people from underprivileged areas to be caregivers for autistic youth abandoned by the state system. But the authorities, concerned that they’ve never sought certification and that many of their carers aren’t ‘officially’ qualified, decide to mount an investigation.

 The result of two years’ immersion in the lives of the two associations, The Extraordinary is a crowd-pleasing charmer, which will have viewers experiencing a gamut of emotions as they fall in love with a host of extraordinary characters in exceptional circumstances.  It’s a testimony to the great things that can be achieved when people support one another in the face of adversity.

 And concluding the 2020 season, on a deliciously whimsical note, will be The Bare Necessity (Perdrix)the directorial debut of Erwan Le Duc, starring Swann Arlaud, Maud Wyler, Fanny Ardant and Nicolas Maury.  Set within a tiny town nestled in the woody mountains of Vosges, this sweetheart of a movie, which delighted hardened cynics when it premiered in Directors’ Fortnight at Cannes 2019, looks at the romantic mayhem that ensues when an enigmatic young woman forces a stagnant family to re-define their boundaries and begin to truly live.

 With so many highlights bursting from this year’s programme, it’s impossible to list every film, but read on for some of the delights to be savoured:

 

A FRIENDLY TALE (Le Bonheur des uns)

Director:  Daniel Cohen                                                        

Cast:  François Damiens, Vincent Cassel, Bérénice Bejo

In this delicious tale of tested loyalties, the close friendship of two long-time couples is put at risk when one of the two wives unexpectedly becomes a best-selling author, upsetting the intricate balance of this formerly close-knit quartet.

 

AZNAVOUR BY CHARLES (Le regard de Charles)

A Film by Charles Aznavour, Directed by Marc di Domenico                                                                 

Narrator: Romain Duris

Crooner, Charles Aznavour, beguiled his legions of fans with a dream of romance.  But his life beyond music was even more extraordinary.  An actor, political activist, diplomat and filmmaker, this enthralling documentary, with rare footage, reveals a complicated, multi-talented man who entertained for the greater part of a century.

 

DEERSKIN (Le daim)

Director:  Quentin Dupieux                                                                 

Cast:  Jean Dujardin, Adèle Haenel, Albert Delpy

With his life in disarray, Georges might not be able to control his circumstances but he can control his wardrobe.  Believing that the deerskin jacket of his dreams is the answer to all of his problems, Georges’ delusions gradually increase each time he wears it, edging his obsession closer to a violent delirium.

 

EDMOND

Director: Alexis Michalik                   

Cast: Thomas Solivérès, Olivier Gourmet, Mathilde Seigner, Dominique Pinon

Paris, 1897. Although not yet thirty and clearly gifted as a writer, Edmond Rostand already has two children, many anxieties, but scant literary success.  When given three weeks to write a play for a mercurial star of the stage, all he has is the title, Cyrano de Bergerac.  Can he accomplish the impossible?

 

FAREWELL TO THE NIGHT (L’adieu à la nuit)

Director: André Téchiné                                                                            

Cast: Catherine Deneuve, Kacey Mottet Klein

Muriel, a respected member of her idyllic local community, is horrified to discover that her visiting grandson, who claims to be heading to Canada for work, has in reality been radicalised by Islamist extremists.  His plans to fight for ISIS in Syria expose this ordinary woman to a moral dilemma of heart-breaking proportions.

 

HOUSE OF CARDIN

Directors: P. David Ebersole, Todd Hughes

Synonymous with glamour, refinement and sophistication, this documentary provides a rare glimpse into the world of a 20th century icon. Allowing unprecedented access to his personal archives, we follow Cardin from his birth in the Italian countryside circa 1922, to his move to France where he made his name in fashion.

 

HOW TO BE A GOOD WIFE (La bonne épouse)

Director: Martin Provost                             

Cast: Juliette Binoche, Yolande Moreau, Noémie Lvovsky, Edouard Baer

In 1968 amidst the lush regions of Alsace, the head of a housekeeping school that transforms teenage girls into ideal housewives, has her pristine life implode when she encounters her long-lost first love whilst simultaneously learning that her business is on the brink of financial ruin.

 

IN THE NAME OF THE LAND (Au nom de la terre)

Director:  Edouard Bergeon                                                     

Cast: Guillaume Canet, Veerle Baetens, Anthony Bajon

Returning to France in the late 70s, Pierre marries his sweetheart and takes over his father’s farm.  But twenty years onwards, Pierre is exhausted.  With mounting debt, what was once satisfying begins to take an insidious toll on his family who risk being torn apart by the property that binds them, in this powerful tale of resilience.

 

LA BELLE ÉPOQUE

Director: Nicolas Bedos                                                                    

Cast: Daniel Auteuil, Guillaume Canet, Doria Tiller

Disillusioned, his long-term marriage on the rocks, a man is given a second chance when he encounters a company offering a unique theatrical service that enables customers to revisit memories through carefully orchestrated re-enactments, thus allowing him to return to 1974 and the peak of his happiness.

 

THE LOST PRINCE (Le prince oublié)

Director: Michel Hazanavicius                                                           

Cast: Omar Sy, Bérénice Bejo, François Damiens

Djibi, a devoted single father, transforms into a heroic Prince in the nightly fairy-tales he tells his beloved 7 year-old daughter, Sofia. But as the years pass, Sofia is ready for her own stories with different heroes.  But is the Prince ready to become just a memory of his daughter’s childhood?

 

LOVE AT SECOND SIGHT (Mon inconnue)

Director: Hugo Gélin                                                                         

Cast: François Civil, Joséphine Japy, Benjamin Lavernhe

After waking in a parallel universe, Raphaël finds his wife, Olivia, is nowhere to be seen and his professional achievements have vanished.  Without Olivia, his life is empty, but winning her back proves harder than he could have imagined – especially when he realises she doesn’t even know who he is!

 

MY DOG STUPID (Mon chien Stupide)

Director: Yvan Attal                                                                             

Cast: Yvan Attal, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Eric Ruf

Henri, a writer in the depths of a mid-life crisis who hasn’t released a successful book in 25 years, strikes-up an unconventional friendship with a stray, bad-mannered dog who inspires him and his dysfunctional family to re-examine their lives and attitudes towards each other.

 

THE MYSTERY OF HENRI PICK (Le mystère Henri Pick)

Director: Rémi Bezançon                                                                                 

Cast: Fabrice Luchini, Camille Cottin, Alice Isaaz

The late Henry Pick, in life an unassuming Breton pizza marker, is celebrated as a brilliant author when a lost manuscript, attributed to him, becomes a literary success.  But one outspoken intellectual thinks the whole thing is a sham, and, after losing his wife, his job and his prominence due to his opinion, decides to uncover the truth.

 

ONLY THE ANIMALS (Seules les bêtes)

Director: Dominik Moll                                                             

Cast: Denis Ménochet, Laure Calamy, Damien Bonnard

Set in an isolated town in the lush, wintery mountains of southern France, the film opens with the departure of Evelyne, a local woman whose disappearance during a snowstorm soon reveals itself as murder. This act of violence gradually unveils the hidden agendas of several locals, setting the unexpected into motion.

 

PROXIMA

Director: Alice Winocour                                                              

Cast: Eva Green, Zélie Boulant- Lemesle, Matt Dillon

As the only woman in the European Space Agency astronaut-training program, single mother Sarah struggles with guilt over the limited time spent with her young daughter, which escalates when she’s invited upon a year-long space mission – Proxima – forcing her to choose between her work and her child.

 

ROOM 212 (Chambre 212)

Director: Christophe Honoré                                           

Cast: Chiara Mastroianni, Benjamin Biolay, Vincent Lacoste

After Maria reveals a long history of affairs to her husband, she opts to spend the night at a hotel opposite their home. But this is a “magical night”, and it’s not long before time collapses upon itself opening a window into the past where young passions are revisited and the very concept of love, questioned.

 

SIBYL

Director: Justine Triet                                                           

Cast: Virginie Efira, Adèle Exarchopoulos, Gaspard Ulliel

Dissatisfied with her life, Sibyl, a psychiatrist, decides to pursue her dream of becoming a writer.  Casting professional ethics aside, she secretly uses the private sessions of her actress patient, Margot, as inspiration for her novel, a decision that irreversibly impacts upon both their lives.

 

SPREAD YOUR WNGS (Donne-moi des ailes)

Director: Nicolas Vanier                                                          

Cast: Jean-Paul Rouve, Mélanie Doutey, Louis Vazquez

Christian, a visionary scientist, studies wild birds. For his son, a teenager obsessed with video games, the idea of spending a vacation with his father in the middle of nature is a nightmare. However, father and son soon bond over a daring project to save an endangered species, which takes them on an incredible journey.

 

THE SWALLOWS OF KABUL (Les hirondelles de Kaboul)

Directors: Zabou Breitman, Éléa Gobbé-Mévellec                        

Voice: Simon Abkarian, Zita Hanrot, Swann Arlaud

Based on the cherished novel of the same name, this critically acclaimed, animated drama follows two couples living in the Afghan capital during the 90s and the impact Taliban rule has on each relationship. Through their individual love stories, unforgettable characters emerge amid the devastating impact of armed combat.

 

THE TRANSLATORS (Les traducteurs)

Director: Régis Roinsard                                                 

Cast: Lambert Wilson, Olga Kurylenko, Riccardo Scamarcio

Nine language experts, hired to translate the final book of a bestselling trilogy, are in lockdown within a luxurious bunker. But when the top-secret manuscript’s first ten pages appear online, their dream job implodes.  The culprit has to amongst them and the publisher is ready to do whatever it takes to unmask who it is.

 

TWO OF US (Deux)

Director: Filippo Meneghetti                                                    

Cast: Barbara Sukowa, Martine Chevallier, Léa Drucker

In this emotionally compelling tale, pensioners Nina and Madeleine have hidden their deep and passionate love for many decades, but their bond is tested when circumstances trigger a series of events, preventing them from moving freely between each other’s apartments.

 

VERNON SUBUTEX

Director: Cathy Verney                                

Cast: Romain Duris, Céline Sallette, Florence Thomassin, Julie Fournier

When Vernon Subutex, an unemployed former owner of a once legendary record shop, is evicted from his flat, he’s helped by old friend rock star Alex Bleach. But Bleach’s sudden death makes Vernon a deadly target when it’s discovered that he’s in possession of 3 mysterious videotapes owned by Bleach.

 

WE’LL END UP TOGETHER (Nous finirons ensemble)

Director: Guillaume Canet                         

 Cast: François Cluzet, Marion Cotillard, Gilles Lellouche, Laurent Lafitte

About to turn 60, nearly broke and estranged from his former friends, restaurateur Max embraces solitude at his soon-to-be-sold beach house.  So when his ex-buddies arrive for a surprise celebration, he turns them away. But this cannot be – something has to be done! The sequel to 2010’s star-studded comedy, LITTLE WHITE LIES.

 

ZOMBI CHILD

Director: Bertrand Bonello                            

Cast: Louise Labèque, Wislanda Louimat, Adilé David, Ninon François

Haiti, 1962…A man is resurrected from the dead and trapped in a nightmare of slavery. Modern-day Paris…Haitian teen Mélissa, the new girl at an elite school, is invited to join a secret ‘literary sorority’.  But the incendiary family secret she harbours becomes a source of fascination to others, who exploit her heritage with shocking results.

 

National dates and venues for the 2020 Alliance Française French Film Festival are:

     

SYDNEY:

 

10 March – 8 April

 

Palace Norton Street, Palace Verona, Chauvel Cinema, Palace Central & Hayden Orpheum Cremorne      

MELBOURNE:

 

11 March – 8 April

 

Palace Balwyn, Palace Brighton Bay, Palace Cinema             Como, Palace Westgarth, Kino Cinemas & The Astor Theatre

PERTH:

 

11 March – 8 April

 

Palace Raine Square, Cinema Paradiso, Luna on SX,

Windsor Cinema & Camelot Outdoor Cinema

CANBERRA:

12 March – 8 April

Palace Electric Cinema

ADELAIDE:

17 March -14 April

Palace Nova Eastend Cinemas, Palace Nova Prospect Cinema

BRISBANE:

18 March -14 April

Palace Barracks & Palace James Street

HOBART:

19 – 28 March

State Cinema

AVOCA BEACH:

19 March – 1 April

Avoca Beach Picture Theatre

PARRAMATTA:

26 – 29 March

Riverside Theatres Parramatta

BYRON BAY:

31 March – 12 April

Palace Byron Bay

BENDIGO:

17 – 19 April

Star Cinema

BALLARAT:

17 -19 April

Regent Cinemas

 

Summary: The Austrian Franz Jägerstätter, a conscientious objector, refuses to fight for the Nazis in World War II.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th January 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Germany, USA

Director: Terrence Malick

Screenwriter: Terrence Malick

Cast: Dimo Alexiev (Nikolai), Leo Baumgartner (Toni Strohhofer), Ulrich Brandhoff (Captain Jurgen), August Diehl (Franz Jagerstatter), Alexander Fehling (Lawyer Feldman), Johannes Gabl (Hessler), Bruno Ganz (Judge Lueban), Adolf Hitler (himself (archival footage)), Bernd Holscher (Judge Ranft), Moritz Katzmair (Martin), Waldemar Kobus (Warden Stein), Jonannes Krisch (Trakl – The Miller), Levan Khurtsia (Levan), Dieter Kosslick (Judge Musshoff), Aennie Lade (Loisi Jagerstatter), Katja Lechthaler (Frau Pate), Monika Lennartz (Frau Schuster), Johan Leyson (Ohlendorf – The Painter), Jasmine Barbara Mairhofer (Frau Pate), Max Malatesta (Max), Karl Marcovics (Mayor Kraus), Ulrich Matthes (Lorenz Schwaninger), Max Mauff (Sterz), Wolfgang Michael (Eckinger), Tobias Moretti (Fr. Furthauer), Thomas Mraz (Prosecuter Kleint), Ida Mutschlechner (Rosi Jagerstatter), Karin Neuhasuer (Rosalia Jagerstatter), Johannes Nussbaum (Josef), Michael Nyqvist (Bishop Fliesser), Valerie Pachner (Fani Jagerstatter), Oliver Pezzi (Fitz), Jurgen Prochnow (Major Schlegel), Nicholas Reinke (Father Moericke), Franz Rogowski (Waldland), Sophie Rois (Aunt Walburga), Andro Sarishvilli (Andro), Matthias Schoenaerts (Captain Herder), Christian Sengeweld (Fr. Kreutzberg), Amber Shave (Rosi Jagerstatter (young)), Ermin Sijamija (Ermin), Maria Simon (Resie Schwaninger), Maria Stadler (Maria), Barbara Stampfl (Maridi Jagerstatter (young)), Benno Steinegger (Corporal Grimm), Michael Steinocher (Officer Kersting), Mark Wasschke (Spitz, the blacksmith), Maria Weger (Maridl Jagerstatter), Martin Wuttke (Major Kiel)

Running Time: 174 mins

Classification: PG (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR A HIDDEN LIFE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

 

 

Kyle McGrath’s Review

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  

 

Other Subculture Entertainment A Hidden Life Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

 

Summary: A musical fantasy about the fantastical human story of Elton John’s breakthrough years.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th May 2019

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 20th June 2019

Australian DVD Release Date: 28th August 2019

Country: UK, USA, Canada

Director: Dexter Fletcher

Screenwriter: Lee Hall

Cast: Charles Armstrong (Mr. Anderson), Guillermo Bedward (Geoff), Jamie Bell (Bernie Taupin), Tom Bennett (Fred), Lee Bridgman (Steve), Rob Callender (Rory), Kit Connor (Older Reggie), Leon Cooke (Hugh/Dancer), Tate Donovan (Doug Weston), Barbara Drennan (Mrs. Anderson), Taron Egerton (Elton John), Ross Farrelly (Cyril), Leigh Francis (Pete), Demetri Goritsas (Carter), Stephen Graham (Dick James), Sharmina Harrower (Heather), Bryce Dallas Howard (Sheila), Matthew Illesley (Young Reggie), Gemma Jones (Ivy), Alexia Khadime (Diana), Kamil Lemieszewski (Dr. Maverick/Paramedic), Marek Lichtenberg (Mike Potts), Ophelia Lovibond (Arabella), Max Mackintosh (Stephen), Steven Mackintosh (Stanley), Richard Madden (John Reid), Will Masheter (Teddy Boy), Benjamin Mason (Bryan), Aston McAuley (Dave Godin), Solomon Mousley (Sonny), Rachel Muldoon (Kiki Dee), Peter O’Hanlon (Bobby), Tom Ogg (George), Jason Pennycooke (Wilson), Diana Alexandra Pocol (Mary the Receptionist), Charlie Rowe (Ray Williams), Celinde Schoenmaker (Renate), Carl Spencer (Ricahrd), Tanisha Spring (Sylvi), Jimmy Vee (Arthur), Evan Walsh (Elton Dean), Harriet Walter (Helen Piena), Leon Delroy Williams (Clint)

Runtime: 121 mins

Classification: M (Australia) 18 (Thailand)

 

 

OUR ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

Most music fans do not need an introduction to Elton John. He is the man responsible for some of the most iconic songs in rock history. From the catchy Don’t Go Breaking My Heart, the heart-wrenching Candle In The Wind through to the cinematic masterpiece Can You Feel The Love Tonight Elton John has wowed music lovers with hit after hit since he first album was released to the public back in 1969.

Despite his popularity it is very rare though that many people could tell you much about the life of Reginald Kenneth Dwight – the man behind the Elton John persona. Sure there have been the news headlines, the lavish lifestyle and his very public relationship with his husband David Furnish. What the tabloids and John’s fans haven’t always been aware of though is the pain felt by the man who always seemed to smile when on stage. The drug abuse and the fractured relationships were kept behind closed doors. It is for that reason that new film Rocketman becomes one of the most important films released this year.

From the creative mind of director Dexter Fletcher, who also recently directed a large chunk of the away winning Bohemian Rhapsody, comes a warts and all look at John. Nothing is hidden here at all. Screenwriter Lee Hall (who also wrote films such as Billy Elliott and War Horse) takes the audience on a journey through John’s life, showing them the almost non-existent and sometimes cruel relationship he had with his father (played here by Steven Mackintosh), the moment his life changed forever when he met his lifelong song-writing partner Bernie Taupin (Jamie Bell) through to the excessive lifestyle and drug abuse that almost ended with John dying in a swimming pool in front of his family and friends.

To Fletcher’s credit Rocketman does all of this with a very unique twist. While the biggest weakness of Bohemian Rhapsody was the fact that the film seemed to just skirt over some of the issues in the life of the late, great Freddie Mercury here Fletcher manages to delve deep into the emotional side of John’s life while managing to keep the film as flamboyant and loud as the man himself. If you are expecting a dour drama as the more painful elements of John’s life are exposed for the audience to see – forget it! Instead Fletcher uses a little bit of creativity and has John pour out his life to a group of people in rehab while moments of true drama and emotion are intercut with loud, colourful dreamscapes as the singer’s biggest hits are performed with very theatrical sequences that wouldn’t be out of place during a big Broadway production. In many ways it is a stroke of genius from Fletcher, yes some people may criticise the film for taking on so many elements of a stage production but given how entertaining and creative Fletcher is with the style aspect of the film it ends up working remarkably well and mirrors the flamboyant actions of the man at the centre of the film.

What else makes Rocketman work so perfectly is no doubt the casting. While some have been sceptical, before they have seen the film, of the choice of young actor Taron Egerton to play the role of Elton John his performance should easily silence those critics and shows Hollywood that Egerton is certainly a star on the rise. While mainly known for his action performances in films like Robin Hood and of course the Kingsman franchise, here Egerton is asked to go out of his comfort zone and instead dance and sing at times while also delivering truly deep, emotional moments of intense acting when it is called for him to do so.

Egerton is also well supported with some stellar performances from his co-stars. Bryce Dallas Howard is almost unrecognisable as John’s mother while Jamie Bell also delivers some moments of true dramatic tension in his role of Bernie Taupin. Game Of Thrones fans will also not be disappointed by the work of Richard Madden who here plays the unlikable John Reid who was once John’s romantic partner. While watching Madden here it becomes very obvious that just like Egerton he is on the verge of becoming one of Hollywood’s biggest stars.

Rocketman is a truly sensational film. The mere fact that the film can tell the story of an at times tortured artist like Elton John while still managing to have its audience tap their feet and sing-a-long to some of his most recognisable tunes is a feat upon itself. The film showcases why Dexter Fletcher needs to be considered one of the most interesting directors going around at the moment while paying a true tribute to a man whose life for the most part has had its sadder moments kept well and truly in the shadows. Creative in the way it is presented on the big screen and with an amazing portrayal of Elton John by an actor that is likely to earn an Oscar nomination Rocketman is the type of film you just sit back and savour.

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating

 

 

 

IMDB Rating  Rocketman (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Rocketman Reviews: N/A

Trailer

 

 

Universal Pictures have this morning released the trailer for THE WHITE CROW. Directed by Ralph Fiennes, the film tells the incredible true story of legendary Russian ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev and his defection to the West in 1961.

A young man of just 22, dressed in a black beret and a dark narrow suit, is on an aeroplane flying from St Petersburg to Paris. It is 1961 and Rudolf Nureyev, not yet the imperious figure of legend, is a member of the world-renowned Kirov Ballet Company, travelling for the first time outside the Soviet Union.

Parisian life delights Nureyev and the young dancer is eager to consume all the culture, art and music the dazzling city has to offer. But the KGB officers who watch his every move become increasingly suspicious of his behaviour and his friendship with the young Parisienne Clara Saint. When they finally confront Nureyev with a shocking demand, he is forced to make a heart-breaking decision, one that may change the course of his life forever and put his family and friends in terrible danger.

From Nureyev’s poverty-stricken childhood in the Soviet city of Ufa, to his blossoming as a student dancer in Leningrad, to his arrival at the epicentre of western culture in Paris in the early 1960s and a nail-biting stand-off at the Le Bourget airport, “THE WHITE CROW” is the true story of an incredible journey by a unique artist who transformed the world of ballet forever.

Transmission Films has released a new trailer for RIDE LIKE A GIRL, the feature film about Michelle Payne, the first female jockey to win the Melbourne Cup. It is the directorial debut from renowned actor Rachel Griffiths and stars Teresa Palmer, Sam Neill, Sullivan Stapleton, Magda Szubanski and introduces Stevie Payne. RIDE LIKE A GIRL will be released in cinemas on 26th September 2019 and the film will captivate and inspire families across Australia.

As a little girl, Michelle Payne dreams of the impossible: winning the Melbourne Cup — horse-racing’s toughest two-mile race. The youngest of 10 children, Michelle is raised by single father Paddy. She leaves school at 15 to become a jockey and after early failures she finds her feet, but a family tragedy, followed by her own near fatal horse fall all but ends the dream. But with the love of her dad and her brother Stevie, Michelle will not give up. Against all the medical advice, and the protests of her siblings, she rides on, and meets Prince of Penzance. Together they overcome impossible odds for a shot at the dream: a ride in the 2015 Melbourne Cup, at odds of 100 to 1. The rest is history.